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The annual ICT4D Conferences have proven to be an invaluable opportunity for NGOs, private sector organizations, universities, governmental agencies and foundations to share their experience in using ICT to increase the impact of development programs and to learn from each other.  In 2016, 715 individuals from 76 countries and 301 private sector and public sector and civil society explored the ways to harness the full power of digital solutions to achieve the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals.  Our thanks to Accenture, Catholic Relief Services, Esri, Hewlett Packard Enterprise, iMerit Technology Services, Inmarsat, IS Solutions, Making All Voices Count, Mercy Corps, Microsoft, NetHope, Oxfam, Pandexio, Qualcom Wireless Reach, RTI International, SimbaNet and World Vision for making that possible.

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08- Governance and Accountability [clear filter]
Monday, May 16
 

10:45

Beyond Connectivity: Building an Inclusive U.N. Agenda for Internet Development
Limited Capacity seats available

In December 2015, the United Nations reached a new WSIS agreement. Notably, the agreement cites the Human Rights Council and its landmark consensus finding that human rights apply online just as they do online. In a win for privacy, the outcome document calls for governments to review surveillance powers and practices, including interception and mass surveillance, in order to better uphold human rights. It also takes note of serious threats to the freedom of expression and access to information. And it calls for greater protections for journalists and civil society.

Access Now works to ensure that users' rights are not undermined in the name of cybersecurity, promoting a user-up approach that incorporates strong encryption and rapid fixes for vulnerabilities that put users at risk, with an emphasis on improving the entire security ecosystem. Bolstering our work, the recent report by the U.N. Special Rapporteur on the freedom of opinion and expression (A/HRC/29/32), David Kaye, found that encryption and anonymity on the internet are necessary for the advancement of human rights. We strongly advocated for the WSIS review to recognize that access to encryption and anonymity tools is essential to the exercise of freedom of expression online, but governments did not respond to our calls.
he internet belongs to all of us. Our aim in WSIS is to ensure that the development and technology agenda respects human rights. That way, WSIS can deliver on its promise as an open, innovative, and transformative vehicle for inclusive, people-centered development and internet governance.

Speakers
EP

Ephraim Percy Kenyanito

Sub-Saharan African Policy Analyst, Access Now
Ephraim is the Sub-Saharan Africa Policy Analyst at Access Now working on the connection between internet policy and human rights in African Union member countries and is also an affiliate at the Internet Policy Observatory (IPO) (at the Center for Global Communication Studies, University... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 10:45 - 11:30
Giraffe 209

10:45

Giving Citizens Actionable Information
Limited Capacity seats available

What keeps people awake at night? Can they influence or participating in how their governments develop and implement policies to meet the SDGs?
For many citizens, the media is still their main source of information and it is through the media that many of them are becoming aware of the SDGs and what their governments have committed to achieving. It is also through the media that citizens have been able to express their concerns over the failures by governments to provide services.

Most governments have in the past adopted policies that have made information sharing an anathema which has meant that decisions about public spending, resource allocations have been shrouded under a cloud of mystery and half-truths. For governments to monitor whether they are on track in achieving the SDGs, they have to collect and analyze data which is used to enhance decision making and improve service delivery.

In its watchdog role, the media has an important role not only of interrogating government policies and spending but also enabling citizens to engage with the data that is being collected about them. The media through innovative use of technology can then present the citizens with the necessary tools or platforms to address the real life challenges that they are facing. These tools also provide strong feedback loops as it gives citizens ways of addressing some of these challenges they face.

For example, incidents of quacks operating clinics and treating patients were quite rampant and led to the development of the Dodgy Doctors tool which allows patients to confirm whether the doctor attending to them is registered. It also enables patients to confirm which hospitals are covered by the National Hospital Insurance Fund and can even be able to locate a medical specialist in their region. This information is easily available on SMS.

Another example of a data driven tool is GoToVote which allows citizens to locate voter registration centers, check registration requirements and track polling results. This is information which previously was difficult to get but is now accessible through a simple SMS.

These tools also need to be action oriented to be meaningful. They should help citizens decipher and navigate the complex forces shaping their worlds. They should support evidence-based public discourse and decision making. An example is WaziMap which provides census and financial allocations broken down into categories allowing comparisons with either the county and or national averages.
In South Africa's Nkomazi region considered the epicentre of the HIV/AIds infection, a Cholera epidemic led to a local newspaper taking the lead in developing a water quality sensor network to track the trend of infections.The sensors made from cheap phones help in detecting the levels of contamination in the rivers and sends SMS alerts to citizens.

While media has never caused revolutions, with innovative application of technology, media can help generate political discourse, enhance citizens' abilities to participate in such discourse and compel governments to action.

Speakers
avatar for Omar Mohammed

Omar Mohammed

Knight International Journalism Fellow, Code for Africa
Omar is spearheading the establishment of the country’s first data journalism initiative, as an International Centre For Journalists (ICFJ) Knight Journalism Fellow and is also helping civic watchdog organisations harness new digital tools and open data to drive social change... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 10:45 - 11:30
Giraffe 207

10:45

Harnessing Tech-Enabled Social Accountability for Peaceful Development in Uganda
Limited Capacity seats available

International Alert's research has shown that well-designed social accountability mechanisms can develop more constructive citizen-state relations and improve community capacities to resolve conflict in fragile situations. Harnessing appropriate technologies can boost the impact of these mechanisms, particularly in fragile contexts where civic space is limited.

Alert is going to pilot a such a mechanism in western Uganda - where the research was conducted - using ZenDesk and voice-recognition technology to log and record community concerns and grievances, share them with local and district government officials, and have them independently monitored and verified by our local partners. The pilot will also use pioneering voting technology using ultra low-cost hardware to allow communities to rate responses to their concerns as well as highlight which grievances they see as most important.

In the session, Jo (who conducted the research) will speak about the governance and technology context in Western Uganda, the accountability challenges currently faced by these communities, and the recommendations made by the research about what a technology-based solution can contribute.

Dan will go on to explain and demonstrate how the solution he has developed seeks to overcome some of these challenges, how and why it fits into existing societal norms around communication and citizen-state relations, and explain the challenges in deploying the technology.

Since the pilot will be in the early stages, we see this as an opportunity for audience members to provide feedback on the approach as well as find out more about how the solution could be deployed in the contexts where they work.

Speakers
DM

Dan Marsh

Head of Technology, International Alert
Dan joined International Alert as Head of Technology in 2013. He is committed to using appropriate technology to support Alert ¹s peacebuilding work internationally as well as providing expertise to the sector through talks, blogs and the peacehack hackathon series. He has... Read More →



Monday May 16, 2016 10:45 - 11:30
Lioness

10:45

Promoting Effective Governance Using Technology
Limited Capacity seats available

The understanding that active citizenship have a direct link between transparency and accountability has led to a considerable amount of debate over the years about the need for governments around the world to deepen their engagement with citizens.The Parliament of Ghana is committed to engage with their constituents since it’s the arm of government that directly represents the people. This is in recognition that responsive governments and empowered citizens are important conditions for inclusive and good governance.However, despite attempts to promote engagement between parliament and citizens, there still remain a large population of Ghanaians that parliament is out of touch with; citizens who are not aware of how parliament works and how it relates to their daily lives. These segment of the citizenry loosely referred to as ‘Democratic Outsiders’ are in fact a majority of the population in Ghana.  Our presentation on ‘Promoting effective governance using technology’ will provide evidence on how we are working to close the feedback loop between citizns and Parliament of  Ghana.  Through“Connecting Citizen to Parliament” http://www.assurances.gov.gh project, the Committee on Government Assurance (CGA), http://www.parliament.gh/committees/31 seeks accountability for the people of Ghana using its oversight mandate to ensure government delivers on its promises and assurances. The project since 2014 has sought to transform the majority of ‘democratic outsiders’ in Ghana into active participants by providing digital platforms (online, SMS, WhatsApp, Mobile App and Social Media) through which citizens can amplify their concerns, complaints, satisfactions, suggestions or displeasure on politics, public policy or general governance issues towards causing improvement in service delivery and holding duty bearers accountable.

Speakers
avatar for Kwami Ahiabenu II

Kwami Ahiabenu II

Executive Director, Penplusbytes
Kwami Ahiabenu, II is founder and Executive Director, www.penplusbytes.org that promotes journalistic innovation and the use of new digital technologies to enable good governance across Africa. He is a Governing Council Member of African University College of Communications. Kwami... Read More →



Monday May 16, 2016 10:45 - 11:30
Giraffe 206

11:30

Beyond Connectivity: Building an Inclusive U.N. Agenda for Internet Development
Limited Capacity seats available

In December 2015, the United Nations reached a new WSIS agreement. Notably, the agreement cites the Human Rights Council and its landmark consensus finding that human rights apply online just as they do online. In a win for privacy, the outcome document calls for governments to review surveillance powers and practices, including interception and mass surveillance, in order to better uphold human rights. It also takes note of serious threats to the freedom of expression and access to information. And it calls for greater protections for journalists and civil society.

Access Now works to ensure that users' rights are not undermined in the name of cybersecurity, promoting a user-up approach that incorporates strong encryption and rapid fixes for vulnerabilities that put users at risk, with an emphasis on improving the entire security ecosystem. Bolstering our work, the recent report by the U.N. Special Rapporteur on the freedom of opinion and expression (A/HRC/29/32), David Kaye, found that encryption and anonymity on the internet are necessary for the advancement of human rights. We strongly advocated for the WSIS review to recognize that access to encryption and anonymity tools is essential to the exercise of freedom of expression online, but governments did not respond to our calls.
he internet belongs to all of us. Our aim in WSIS is to ensure that the development and technology agenda respects human rights. That way, WSIS can deliver on its promise as an open, innovative, and transformative vehicle for inclusive, people-centered development and internet governance.

Speakers
EP

Ephraim Percy Kenyanito

Sub-Saharan African Policy Analyst, Access Now
Ephraim is the Sub-Saharan Africa Policy Analyst at Access Now working on the connection between internet policy and human rights in African Union member countries and is also an affiliate at the Internet Policy Observatory (IPO) (at the Center for Global Communication Studies, University... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 11:30 - 12:15
Giraffe 209

11:30

Giving Citizens Actionable Information
Limited Capacity seats available

What keeps people awake at night? Can they influence or participating in how their governments develop and implement policies to meet the SDGs?
For many citizens, the media is still their main source of information and it is through the media that many of them are becoming aware of the SDGs and what their governments have committed to achieving. It is also through the media that citizens have been able to express their concerns over the failures by governments to provide services.

Most governments have in the past adopted policies that have made information sharing an anathema which has meant that decisions about public spending, resource allocations have been shrouded under a cloud of mystery and half-truths. For governments to monitor whether they are on track in achieving the SDGs, they have to collect and analyze data which is used to enhance decision making and improve service delivery.

In its watchdog role, the media has an important role not only of interrogating government policies and spending but also enabling citizens to engage with the data that is being collected about them. The media through innovative use of technology can then present the citizens with the necessary tools or platforms to address the real life challenges that they are facing. These tools also provide strong feedback loops as it gives citizens ways of addressing some of these challenges they face.

For example, incidents of quacks operating clinics and treating patients were quite rampant and led to the development of the Dodgy Doctors tool which allows patients to confirm whether the doctor attending to them is registered. It also enables patients to confirm which hospitals are covered by the National Hospital Insurance Fund and can even be able to locate a medical specialist in their region. This information is easily available on SMS.

Another example of a data driven tool is GoToVote which allows citizens to locate voter registration centers, check registration requirements and track polling results. This is information which previously was difficult to get but is now accessible through a simple SMS.

These tools also need to be action oriented to be meaningful. They should help citizens decipher and navigate the complex forces shaping their worlds. They should support evidence-based public discourse and decision making. An example is WaziMap which provides census and financial allocations broken down into categories allowing comparisons with either the county and or national averages.
In South Africa's Nkomazi region considered the epicentre of the HIV/AIds infection, a Cholera epidemic led to a local newspaper taking the lead in developing a water quality sensor network to track the trend of infections.The sensors made from cheap phones help in detecting the levels of contamination in the rivers and sends SMS alerts to citizens.

While media has never caused revolutions, with innovative application of technology, media can help generate political discourse, enhance citizens' abilities to participate in such discourse and compel governments to action.

Speakers
avatar for Omar Mohammed

Omar Mohammed

Knight International Journalism Fellow, Code for Africa
Omar is spearheading the establishment of the country’s first data journalism initiative, as an International Centre For Journalists (ICFJ) Knight Journalism Fellow and is also helping civic watchdog organisations harness new digital tools and open data to drive social change... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 11:30 - 12:15
Giraffe 207

11:30

Harnessing Tech-Enabled Social Accountability for Peaceful Development in Uganda
Limited Capacity seats available

International Alert's research has shown that well-designed social accountability mechanisms can develop more constructive citizen-state relations and improve community capacities to resolve conflict in fragile situations. Harnessing appropriate technologies can boost the impact of these mechanisms, particularly in fragile contexts where civic space is limited.

Alert is going to pilot a such a mechanism in western Uganda - where the research was conducted - using ZenDesk and voice-recognition technology to log and record community concerns and grievances, share them with local and district government officials, and have them independently monitored and verified by our local partners. The pilot will also use pioneering voting technology using ultra low-cost hardware to allow communities to rate responses to their concerns as well as highlight which grievances they see as most important.

In the session, Jo (who conducted the research) will speak about the governance and technology context in Western Uganda, the accountability challenges currently faced by these communities, and the recommendations made by the research about what a technology-based solution can contribute.

Dan will go on to explain and demonstrate how the solution he has developed seeks to overcome some of these challenges, how and why it fits into existing societal norms around communication and citizen-state relations, and explain the challenges in deploying the technology.

Since the pilot will be in the early stages, we see this as an opportunity for audience members to provide feedback on the approach as well as find out more about how the solution could be deployed in the contexts where they work.

Speakers
DM

Dan Marsh

Head of Technology, International Alert
Dan joined International Alert as Head of Technology in 2013. He is committed to using appropriate technology to support Alert ¹s peacebuilding work internationally as well as providing expertise to the sector through talks, blogs and the peacehack hackathon series. He has... Read More →



Monday May 16, 2016 11:30 - 12:15
Lioness

11:30

Promoting Effective Governance Using Technology
Limited Capacity seats available

Established on the 18th of July 2001 as a non-profit organisation, Penplusbytes is committed to enhancing governance by deepening citizen's participation through ICT. Penplusbytes' overarching philosophy is that establishing effective working relationships with governments, parliaments, corporate organisations, donors, international organisations, non-profits organisations and citizens is the key to being relevant and delivering value.

The organisation currently organises its work around three thematic areas namely;

Extractives (Mining, Oil and Gas)
New Media and Innovations and
The use of New Digital Technologies to drive Good Governance and Transparency.

Speakers
avatar for Kwami Ahiabenu II

Kwami Ahiabenu II

Executive Director, Penplusbytes
Kwami Ahiabenu, II is founder and Executive Director, www.penplusbytes.org that promotes journalistic innovation and the use of new digital technologies to enable good governance across Africa. He is a Governing Council Member of African University College of Communications. Kwami... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 11:30 - 12:15
Giraffe 206

12:15

Giving Citizens Actionable Information
Limited Capacity seats available

What keeps people awake at night? Can they influence or participating in how their governments develop and implement policies to meet the SDGs?
For many citizens, the media is still their main source of information and it is through the media that many of them are becoming aware of the SDGs and what their governments have committed to achieving. It is also through the media that citizens have been able to express their concerns over the failures by governments to provide services.

Most governments have in the past adopted policies that have made information sharing an anathema which has meant that decisions about public spending, resource allocations have been shrouded under a cloud of mystery and half-truths. For governments to monitor whether they are on track in achieving the SDGs, they have to collect and analyze data which is used to enhance decision making and improve service delivery.

In its watchdog role, the media has an important role not only of interrogating government policies and spending but also enabling citizens to engage with the data that is being collected about them. The media through innovative use of technology can then present the citizens with the necessary tools or platforms to address the real life challenges that they are facing. These tools also provide strong feedback loops as it gives citizens ways of addressing some of these challenges they face.

For example, incidents of quacks operating clinics and treating patients were quite rampant and led to the development of the Dodgy Doctors tool which allows patients to confirm whether the doctor attending to them is registered. It also enables patients to confirm which hospitals are covered by the National Hospital Insurance Fund and can even be able to locate a medical specialist in their region. This information is easily available on SMS.

Another example of a data driven tool is GoToVote which allows citizens to locate voter registration centers, check registration requirements and track polling results. This is information which previously was difficult to get but is now accessible through a simple SMS.

These tools also need to be action oriented to be meaningful. They should help citizens decipher and navigate the complex forces shaping their worlds. They should support evidence-based public discourse and decision making. An example is WaziMap which provides census and financial allocations broken down into categories allowing comparisons with either the county and or national averages.
In South Africa's Nkomazi region considered the epicentre of the HIV/AIds infection, a Cholera epidemic led to a local newspaper taking the lead in developing a water quality sensor network to track the trend of infections.The sensors made from cheap phones help in detecting the levels of contamination in the rivers and sends SMS alerts to citizens.

While media has never caused revolutions, with innovative application of technology, media can help generate political discourse, enhance citizens' abilities to participate in such discourse and compel governments to action.

Speakers
avatar for Omar Mohammed

Omar Mohammed

Knight International Journalism Fellow, Code for Africa
Omar is spearheading the establishment of the country’s first data journalism initiative, as an International Centre For Journalists (ICFJ) Knight Journalism Fellow and is also helping civic watchdog organisations harness new digital tools and open data to drive social change... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 12:15 - 13:00
Giraffe 207

12:15

Harnessing Tech-Enabled Social Accountability for Peaceful Development in Uganda
Limited Capacity seats available

International Alert's research has shown that well-designed social accountability mechanisms can develop more constructive citizen-state relations and improve community capacities to resolve conflict in fragile situations. Harnessing appropriate technologies can boost the impact of these mechanisms, particularly in fragile contexts where civic space is limited.

Alert is going to pilot a such a mechanism in western Uganda - where the research was conducted - using ZenDesk and voice-recognition technology to log and record community concerns and grievances, share them with local and district government officials, and have them independently monitored and verified by our local partners. The pilot will also use pioneering voting technology using ultra low-cost hardware to allow communities to rate responses to their concerns as well as highlight which grievances they see as most important.

In the session, Jo (who conducted the research) will speak about the governance and technology context in Western Uganda, the accountability challenges currently faced by these communities, and the recommendations made by the research about what a technology-based solution can contribute.

Dan will go on to explain and demonstrate how the solution he has developed seeks to overcome some of these challenges, how and why it fits into existing societal norms around communication and citizen-state relations, and explain the challenges in deploying the technology.

Since the pilot will be in the early stages, we see this as an opportunity for audience members to provide feedback on the approach as well as find out more about how the solution could be deployed in the contexts where they work.

Speakers
DM

Dan Marsh

Head of Technology, International Alert
Dan joined International Alert as Head of Technology in 2013. He is committed to using appropriate technology to support Alert ¹s peacebuilding work internationally as well as providing expertise to the sector through talks, blogs and the peacehack hackathon series. He has... Read More →



Monday May 16, 2016 12:15 - 13:00
Lioness

12:15

Implementing ICT4D in Complex Multiple Emergencies
Limited Capacity full

The Jonglei Food Security Program (JFSP) is a Title II program funded by United States Agency for International Development (USAID) Food for Peace (FFP) and implemented by a consortium led by Catholic Relief Services (CRS) with Save the Children International (SCI) and government stakeholders. The program is implemented in Jonglei State, South Sudan. After decades of war with The Sudan, South Sudan finally seceded and got its independence in 2011. Jonglei State, and pretty much of the whole country is characterized by poor roads, dilapidated infrastructure, lack of electricity in the grid and limited amenities. In December 2013, a political violent conflict broke out, which took an ethnic dimension in the state, diving the state where the program is run, into government and opposition controlled areas adding further challenges for implementation in an already difficult terrain. JFSP employed the use of information communication technologies (ICT) to ease on the logistics challenges associated with implementing a food security project in a conflict situation with very limited infrastructure. The program trained over 50 MEAL and program staff on using ipads for data collection on the i-formbuilder platform and has been using the technology to collect registration, monitoring and survey data on food for asset, agriculture, livestock, water and sanitation and nutrition programs. Field teams sync their data to the server as soon as they came from the field and the data would be immediately available for downloading, analysis and reporting. Use of ipads in the South Sudan context allowed JFSP to collect real time data, produce timely reports and improve efficiency in serving the conflict affected communities. It has revolutionized data collection and significantly improved data quality. The program managed to draw lessons and best practices on the use of mobile technologies in a conflict situation with limited infrastructure, which go beyond the ICT gadgets but incorporate the human element.

Speakers
avatar for Rodwell Masocha Sibanda

Rodwell Masocha Sibanda

MEAL Manager, Catholic Relief Services South Sudan
Rodwell Masocha Sibanda is a CRS Monitoring, Evaluation, Accountability and Learning (MEAL) manager and leads the USAID-funded Jonglei Food Security Program consortium MEAL department. He has been in South Sudan since 2010, and has been with the JFSP since inception in 2011. He was... Read More →



Monday May 16, 2016 12:15 - 13:00
Giraffe 206

12:15

Using Mobile to Gather Citizen Views on the SDGs in Tanzania
Limited Capacity seats available

Citizen Engagement and education is an important element in many development projects. With feedback from citizens, organizations or governments can learn how to better target public awareness campaigns, find out what messages are getting through, and obtain vital information on the public's reaction to a local or international initiative. With the launch of the Sustainable Development Goals in 2015, many local agencies are looking for guidance on what goals to prioritize, and direct feedback from citizens is extremely valuable. In the past it has been difficult to quickly reach a large group of citizens across a country, but the prevalence of ICTs and particularly mobile phones is changing that. In December 2015, the UN Tanzania and mobile surveying platform GeoPoll worked together to educate Tanzanians on the SDGs and gather feedback from a select group. This two-staged project first used SMS messages to raise awareness of the SDGs. In just 3 days, GeoPoll and UN Tanzania reached a group of 88,000 Tanzanians in specific states, texting them a list of all the SDGs in order to educate the public on the goals. From this original group, 2,000 received a follow-up survey on which SDG was most important to them. This allowed UN Tanzania to further understand what activities to prioritize in Tanzania. Results showed that ending poverty was the most important SDG to 30% of respondents, followed by implementing the global partnership for sustainable development (13%), promoting peace (11%) and ensuring inclusive education (9%). Without the use of ICTs and the prevalence of mobiles this important feedback would have been nearly impossible to gather, and the 88,000 Tanzanians would not have been educated on the SDGs and their importance.

Speakers
JM

John Muthee

Vice President, Business Development in Africa, GeoPoll
John Muthee is the Vice President of Business Development, Africa, at GeoPoll, where he oversees GeoPoll’s Africa-based sales team and engages with clients to identify needs for mobile surveying research in the international development and commercial sectors. A leader in market... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 12:15 - 13:00
Giraffe 209

14:00

Can Information + Accountability Transform Health?
Limited Capacity seats available

GOAL Uganda is implementing a randomized control trial (RCT) evaluation of an intervention designed to strengthen health service provision and citizen ownership. Central to the Accountability Can Transform Health (ACT Health) program is the development of Citizen's Report Cards (CRC) to provide information on the status of service delivery based on responses from households and health workers (confirmed with secondary source data). The CRCs are shared in interface meetings, where community members and health workers develop action plans identifying priority actions to improve health and health services. These elements are the foundation of a factorial design RCT. We distinguish the first and second processes (information and mobilization) from the third (interface meetings) to test their independent and combined impacts. The complete intervention combines all components ("information and mobilization plus interface"). This evaluation is taking place across 96 control and 282 intervention health facilities in Uganda from 2014 to 2016.

Increasingly, development interventions and public service programs are a blend of art and science. The strategic introduction of technology has great potential to creatively bridge the world of development art and implementation science. We have theories about the importance of information and communication. We also have theories about the role that technology can play. By May 2016, GOAL Uganda will have very preliminary findings from the midline evaluation of the ACT Health program. If information proves a critical component of the success of the methodology, technological innovations that reduce the cost of collecting, analyzing and storing information will be critical to scalability.

Speakers
AB

Angela Bailey

Programme Director, GOAL International Humanitarian Organisation
Angela Bailey is director of the GOAL Accountability Can Transform Health (ACT Health) program. She holds an MIA from Columbia University School of International and Public Affairs (SIPA), but has learned infinitely more about the realities and implications of accountability for service... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 14:00 - 14:45
Giraffe 207

14:00

Implementing ICT4D in Complex Multiple Emergencies
Limited Capacity seats available

The Jonglei Food Security Program (JFSP) is a Title II program funded by United States Agency for International Development (USAID) Food for Peace (FFP) and implemented by a consortium led by Catholic Relief Services (CRS) with Save the Children International (SCI) and government stakeholders. The program is implemented in Jonglei State, South Sudan. After decades of war with The Sudan, South Sudan finally seceded and got its independence in 2011. Jonglei State, and pretty much of the whole country is characterized by poor roads, dilapidated infrastructure, lack of electricity in the grid and limited amenities. In December 2013, a political violent conflict broke out, which took an ethnic dimension in the state, diving the state where the program is run, into government and opposition controlled areas adding further challenges for implementation in an already difficult terrain. JFSP employed the use of information communication technologies (ICT) to ease on the logistics challenges associated with implementing a food security project in a conflict situation with very limited infrastructure. The program trained over 50 MEAL and program staff on using ipads for data collection on the i-formbuilder platform and has been using the technology to collect registration, monitoring and survey data on food for asset, agriculture, livestock, water and sanitation and nutrition programs. Field teams sync their data to the server as soon as they came from the field and the data would be immediately available for downloading, analysis and reporting. Use of ipads in the South Sudan context allowed JFSP to collect real time data, produce timely reports and improve efficiency in serving the conflict affected communities. It has revolutionized data collection and significantly improved data quality. The program managed to draw lessons and best practices on the use of mobile technologies in a conflict situation with limited infrastructure, which go beyond the ICT gadgets but incorporate the human element.

Speakers
avatar for Rodwell Masocha Sibanda

Rodwell Masocha Sibanda

MEAL Manager, Catholic Relief Services South Sudan
Rodwell Masocha Sibanda is a CRS Monitoring, Evaluation, Accountability and Learning (MEAL) manager and leads the USAID-funded Jonglei Food Security Program consortium MEAL department. He has been in South Sudan since 2010, and has been with the JFSP since inception in 2011. He was... Read More →



Monday May 16, 2016 14:00 - 14:45
Lioness

14:00

Inclusive ICT4Peacebuilding: Capturing the Narrative of Former Combatants in Tech-Supported Peacebuilding Programs
Limited Capacity filling up

Peacebuilding, or the process by which a community engages in institution-building and other activities that increase the likelihood of lasting peace, requires the buy-in and engagement of many actors from various corners of a post-conflict society.  

Security sector reform (SSR) and disarmament, demobilization, and reintegration (DDR) are two conflict-to-peace transition  institutions  that seek to 1) decrease the number of combatants in a given country and 2) increase the likelihood that these individuals will become contributing members of  government security forces and/or  civilian communities.  

The role of ICT4D in the peacebuilding realm has evolved over the past several years to include awareness of specific vulnerabilities and needs of communities emerging from conflict. Yet,  the dialogue regarding the future of ICT for peacebuilding remains remarkably void of conversation regarding the role that former combatants and security sector actors have to  play  in peacebuilding programming.  


We present several cases that  specifically engage these often marginalized populations and demonstrate promise for future ICT for peacebuilding programs.  We ground these case studies in theoretical constructs from the peacebuilding, security, and public health literatures in order to present a practical framework for developing such inclusive and innovative programming.  

Speakers
JP

Jennifer Parkin

Methodologist and Consultant, Independent Researcher
I possess a Masters in Public Health from Indiana University, a Masters in Political Science from the University of New Mexico, and am currently a PhD Candidate in Political Science. I have completed research-intensive symposiums and institutes globally, and have experience collecting... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 14:00 - 14:45
Giraffe 206

14:00

Open Data for Efficient Governance in Developing Countries
Limited Capacity filling up

This presentation is related to a pilot initiative that is currently being implemented in Nepal. The action research explores the rationale of adopting open data practices in budgetary process to bridge the information gap between government executive agencies, parliamentarians and citizens This action research seeks to identify the data need of each of these three stakeholders, implement open data solution based on the need and document impact stories of enhanced government accountability and civic engagement.

While the research is focused on demand side, adequate effort have been put into engagement with the supply side as well to see how open data model, developed as part of the research can have sustainable impact in the long run. This research aims to explore how two distinct groups of data users - parliamentarians and local citizen intermediary organizations can use disaggregated data on budget allocation, expenditure and progress for enhanced government accountability and civic participation. At the local level, the research proposes to test innovative models of meeting data need of disconnected communities in an off-line environment.

This research represents an inquiry about open data solutions and its relation to enhanced policy making discourse at the central level and practical civic engagement strategies at the local level.

Speakers
avatar for Bibhusan Bista (YoungInnovations)

Bibhusan Bista (YoungInnovations)

CEO, Young Innovations Pvt. Ltd.
I am the CEO and co-founder of YoungInnovations, a leading software development firm based in Nepal providing solutions to different parts of the globe. I have my background in technology, research and international development. I have led successful projects around open data, transparency... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 14:00 - 14:45
Giraffe 209

14:45

Can Information + Accountability Transform Health?
Limited Capacity seats available

GOAL Uganda is implementing a randomized control trial (RCT) evaluation of an intervention designed to strengthen health service provision and citizen ownership. Central to the Accountability Can Transform Health (ACT Health) program is the development of Citizen's Report Cards (CRC) to provide information on the status of service delivery based on responses from households and health workers (confirmed with secondary source data). The CRCs are shared in interface meetings, where community members and health workers develop action plans identifying priority actions to improve health and health services. These elements are the foundation of a factorial design RCT. We distinguish the first and second processes (information and mobilization) from the third (interface meetings) to test their independent and combined impacts. The complete intervention combines all components ("information and mobilization plus interface"). This evaluation is taking place across 96 control and 282 intervention health facilities in Uganda from 2014 to 2016.

Increasingly, development interventions and public service programs are a blend of art and science. The strategic introduction of technology has great potential to creatively bridge the world of development art and implementation science. We have theories about the importance of information and communication. We also have theories about the role that technology can play. By May 2016, GOAL Uganda will have very preliminary findings from the midline evaluation of the ACT Health program. If information proves a critical component of the success of the methodology, technological innovations that reduce the cost of collecting, analyzing and storing information will be critical to scalability.

Speakers
AB

Angela Bailey

Programme Director, GOAL International Humanitarian Organisation
Angela Bailey is director of the GOAL Accountability Can Transform Health (ACT Health) program. She holds an MIA from Columbia University School of International and Public Affairs (SIPA), but has learned infinitely more about the realities and implications of accountability for service... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 14:45 - 15:30
Giraffe 207

14:45

Implementing ICT4D in Complex Multiple Emergencies
Limited Capacity seats available

The Jonglei Food Security Program (JFSP) is a Title II program funded by United States Agency for International Development (USAID) Food for Peace (FFP) and implemented by a consortium led by Catholic Relief Services (CRS) with Save the Children International (SCI) and government stakeholders. The program is implemented in Jonglei State, South Sudan. After decades of war with The Sudan, South Sudan finally seceded and got its independence in 2011. Jonglei State, and pretty much of the whole country is characterized by poor roads, dilapidated infrastructure, lack of electricity in the grid and limited amenities. In December 2013, a political violent conflict broke out, which took an ethnic dimension in the state, diving the state where the program is run, into government and opposition controlled areas adding further challenges for implementation in an already difficult terrain. JFSP employed the use of information communication technologies (ICT) to ease on the logistics challenges associated with implementing a food security project in a conflict situation with very limited infrastructure. The program trained over 50 MEAL and program staff on using ipads for data collection on the i-formbuilder platform and has been using the technology to collect registration, monitoring and survey data on food for asset, agriculture, livestock, water and sanitation and nutrition programs. Field teams sync their data to the server as soon as they came from the field and the data would be immediately available for downloading, analysis and reporting. Use of ipads in the South Sudan context allowed JFSP to collect real time data, produce timely reports and improve efficiency in serving the conflict affected communities. It has revolutionized data collection and significantly improved data quality. The program managed to draw lessons and best practices on the use of mobile technologies in a conflict situation with limited infrastructure, which go beyond the ICT gadgets but incorporate the human element.

Speakers
avatar for Rodwell Masocha Sibanda

Rodwell Masocha Sibanda

MEAL Manager, Catholic Relief Services South Sudan
Rodwell Masocha Sibanda is a CRS Monitoring, Evaluation, Accountability and Learning (MEAL) manager and leads the USAID-funded Jonglei Food Security Program consortium MEAL department. He has been in South Sudan since 2010, and has been with the JFSP since inception in 2011. He was... Read More →



Monday May 16, 2016 14:45 - 15:30
Lioness

14:45

Inclusive ICT4Peacebuilding: Capturing the Narrative of Former Combatants in Tech-Supported Peacebuilding Programs
Limited Capacity seats available

Peacebuilding, or the process by which a community engages in institution-building and other activities that increase the likelihood of lasting peace, requires the buy-in and engagement of many actors from various corners of a post-conflict society.  

Security sector reform (SSR) and disarmament, demobilization, and reintegration (DDR) are two conflict-to-peace transition  institutions  that seek to 1) decrease the number of combatants in a given country and 2) increase the likelihood that these individuals will become contributing members of  government security forces and/or  civilian communities.  

The role of ICT4D in the peacebuilding realm has evolved over the past several years to include awareness of specific vulnerabilities and needs of communities emerging from conflict. Yet,  the dialogue regarding the future of ICT for peacebuilding remains remarkably void of conversation regarding the role that former combatants and security sector actors have to  play  in peacebuilding programming.  


We present several cases that  specifically engage these often marginalized populations and demonstrate promise for future ICT for peacebuilding programs.  We ground these case studies in theoretical constructs from the peacebuilding, security, and public health literatures in order to present a practical framework for developing such inclusive and innovative programming.  

Speakers
JP

Jennifer Parkin

Methodologist and Consultant, Independent Researcher
I possess a Masters in Public Health from Indiana University, a Masters in Political Science from the University of New Mexico, and am currently a PhD Candidate in Political Science. I have completed research-intensive symposiums and institutes globally, and have experience collecting... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 14:45 - 15:30
Giraffe 206

14:45

Open Data for Efficient Governance in Developing Countries
Limited Capacity full

This presentation is related to a pilot initiative that is currently being implemented in Nepal. The action research explores the rationale of adopting open data practices in budgetary process to bridge the information gap between government executive agencies, parliamentarians and citizens This action research seeks to identify the data need of each of these three stakeholders, implement open data solution based on the need and document impact stories of enhanced government accountability and civic engagement.

While the research is focused on demand side, adequate effort have been put into engagement with the supply side as well to see how open data model, developed as part of the research can have sustainable impact in the long run. This research aims to explore how two distinct groups of data users - parliamentarians and local citizen intermediary organizations can use disaggregated data on budget allocation, expenditure and progress for enhanced government accountability and civic participation. At the local level, the research proposes to test innovative models of meeting data need of disconnected communities in an off-line environment.

This research represents an inquiry about open data solutions and its relation to enhanced policy making discourse at the central level and practical civic engagement strategies at the local level.

Speakers
avatar for Bibhusan Bista (YoungInnovations)

Bibhusan Bista (YoungInnovations)

CEO, Young Innovations Pvt. Ltd.
I am the CEO and co-founder of YoungInnovations, a leading software development firm based in Nepal providing solutions to different parts of the globe. I have my background in technology, research and international development. I have led successful projects around open data, transparency... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 14:45 - 15:30
Giraffe 209

16:00

Evaluating Digital Citizen Engagement - a Practical Workshop
Limited Capacity filling up

With growing demand for transparency, accountability and citizen participation in policy making and service
provision, citizen engagement is becoming increasingly important. Citizen engagement means engagement
between citizens and governments, donors and the private sector bodies that deliver government services.
Increased use of technology brings both opportunities and challenges to citizen engagement processes,
including opportunities for collecting, analyzing and evaluating data about those processes.
This participatory and practical workshop will look at the effective evaluation of such Digital Citizen
Engagement (DCE) initiatives.

Speakers
avatar for Dr. Claudia Lopes

Dr. Claudia Lopes

Head of Research and Innovation, Africa's Voices Foundation
Claudia is Head of Research at Africa's Voices Foundation, a spin-out from the University of Cambridge, UK. Claudia has several years of experience working in Africa on research projects related to new technologies and radio audiences interactivity. She is trained as social psychologist... Read More →



Monday May 16, 2016 16:00 - 16:45
Giraffe 207

16:00

Open Schools Kenya
Limited Capacity seats available

Map Kibera made the invisible visible. Now Open Schools Kenya (www.openschoolskenya.org) is a project supported by Gates Foundation and implemented by Map Kibera Trust to try and make education information easily available, accessible and useful to everyone, focusing on Kibera as a pilot site. The project has seen around 350 schools mapped in Kibera including informal, private and public schools. The project aims to help parents make informed choices on which schools to take their children to depending on their capabilities and also preferences. Schools can also learn what other schools are doing hence healthy competition towards achieving the SDG number 4. And government now have the data for all the schools in Kibera and can use it for proper planning around education.  NGOs and donors can also use the website to fund or implement other educational programs in the area. The website gives each and every school  a profile page with details ranging from the population, programs offered, fees, contact info etc. 


Speakers
avatar for Joshua Ogure

Joshua Ogure

Project Coordinator, Map Kibera Trust
Joshua Ogure is the project coordinator for Map Kibera Trust, he coordinates the whole mapping team as well as the video team that is Kibera News Network. Ogure lead the Open Schools Kenya Project and resides in Kibera. He strives to make the invisible visible through the use of his... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 16:00 - 16:45
Giraffe 206

16:00

Systems Change: Real-Time Data for Agile, Responsible and Participatory Development
Limited Capacity seats available

There is an increasing call by the global development community for Aid to be more agile, contextual and inclusive as we recognize how complex the environments are that we operate within. Movements like Doing Development Differently, Thinking and Working Politically, Feedback Labs, #adaptdev and others are trying to push donors and implementors to be more adaptive and problem-driven. These efforts have contributed to major donor reforms such as DFID's Smart Rules, the World Bank's Science of Delivery and USAID's upcoming revisions to its Operations Policy and Program Cycle, as well as larger investments in Adaptive Management. These efforts will create a large demand for services and tools that that allow for a more participatory and agile approach to development -- a demand that the ICT4D community can be well positioned to meet.   

This session will present the larger landscape in development that is pushing for these systemic changes, and present a new initiative that USAID's Global Development Lab is launching to conceive, design, and test how real-time data systems can enable a more adaptive and participatory approach to development in complex settings. This initiative is not focused on adaptation or feedbacks for their own sake, but how decisions can be made in a more responsive, contextual and participatory fashion with access to relevant and usable data at the appropriate times. The initiative is also concerned with how to most appropriately integrate flow data to and from multiple agents and decision makers across the 'information supply chain' - including community members, frontline workers, mid-level managers, and government decision makers - to facilitate rapid operational assessments, adaptive and iterative learning through tight feedback loops throughout the implementation of program delivery, and M&E. The understanding of the power, agency and behavior of the various decision makers, as well as the governance applications that allow for more sustainable and adaptive programming models, will be integral to the success of this work for the ICT4D and broader development community.


Speakers
ZB

Zack Brisson

Principal, Reboot
Zack Brisson is a founder & principal at Reboot, a social enterprise dedicated to inclusive development and accountable governance. A practicing theorist, Zack has extensive experience bringing community-driven approaches to policymaking, program design, and implementation. At Reboot... Read More →
avatar for Samir Doshi

Samir Doshi

Senior Scientist, US Agency for International Development (USAID)
Dr. Samir K. Doshi is a Senior Scientist at USAID. Samir leads the Real-Time Data for Adaptive Management initiative at USAID's Global Development Lab, with a focus on how local communities can use digital technologies in complex environments to better monitor, evaluate, learn and... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 16:00 - 16:45
Cub

16:00

Digital Privacy, Security and Safety: What Are They and How Can We Get Them Right? (1.5 Hours)
Limited Capacity full

Participants at this workshop will learn why digital privacy, safety and security are critical in development work today. Session facilitators will provide an overview of important terms and concepts in the field of data privacy and security and how certain practices can create greater risk for vulnerable groups and increase liability for organizations. Workshop attendees will learn about the importance of responsible data policies that protect and empower program participants, ways to reduce data-related risk for especially vulnerable populations such as girls and women, how responsible data policies affect program implementation at various levels, and why open data policies need to strike a balance with privacy policies. Workshop participants will leave with a better understanding of digital privacy, security, and safety and practical tools for developing ethical data policies and practices.

Moderators
avatar for Linda Raftree

Linda Raftree

Organizer, MERL Tech
Linda Raftree supports strategy, program design, research, and technology in international development initiatives. She co-founded MERLTech in 2014 and also works as an independent consultant. Linda advises Girl Effect on digital safety, security and privacy and supports the organization... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Amy O'Donnell

Amy O'Donnell

ICT in Programme Lead, Oxfam
Amy is an adviser on applications of information communications technologies (ICTs) to support programming at Oxfam GB. Her role involves supporting staff working in humanitarian response, campaigning and long term development to explore effective design and best practice in the use... Read More →
avatar for Paul Perrin

Paul Perrin

Director for Monitoring, Evaluation, Accountability and Learning, Catholic Relief Services
Paul Perrin is the Director for Monitoring, Evaluation, Accountability, and Learning at Catholic Relief Services (CRS) and serves as Adjunct Faculty at the University of Notre Dame. His work at CRS has largely focused on supporting country programs in conceptualizing, designing, implementing... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 16:00 - 17:30
Giraffe 209

16:45

Evaluating Digital Citizen Engagement - a Practical Workshop
Limited Capacity seats available

With growing demand for transparency, accountability and citizen participation in policy making and service
provision, citizen engagement is becoming increasingly important. Citizen engagement means engagement
between citizens and governments, donors and the private sector bodies that deliver government services.
Increased use of technology brings both opportunities and challenges to citizen engagement processes,
including opportunities for collecting, analyzing and evaluating data about those processes.
This participatory and practical one-day workshop will look at the effective evaluation of such Digital Citizen
Engagement (DCE) initiatives.

Speakers
avatar for Dr. Claudia Lopes

Dr. Claudia Lopes

Head of Research and Innovation, Africa's Voices Foundation
Claudia is Head of Research at Africa's Voices Foundation, a spin-out from the University of Cambridge, UK. Claudia has several years of experience working in Africa on research projects related to new technologies and radio audiences interactivity. She is trained as social psychologist... Read More →



Monday May 16, 2016 16:45 - 17:30
Giraffe 207

16:45

Inclusive ICT4Peacebuilding: Capturing the Narrative of Former Combatants in Tech-Supported Peacebuilding Programs
Limited Capacity seats available

Peacebuilding, or the process by which a community engages in institution-building and other activities that increase the likelihood of lasting peace, requires the buy-in and engagement of many actors from various corners of a post-conflict society.  

Security sector reform (SSR) and disarmament, demobilization, and reintegration (DDR) are two conflict-to-peace transition  institutions  that seek to 1) decrease the number of combatants in a given country and 2) increase the likelihood that these individuals will become contributing members of  government security forces and/or  civilian communities.  

The role of ICT4D in the peacebuilding realm has evolved over the past several years to include awareness of specific vulnerabilities and needs of communities emerging from conflict. Yet,  the dialogue regarding the future of ICT for peacebuilding remains remarkably void of conversation regarding the role that former combatants and security sector actors have to  play  in peacebuilding programming.  


We present several cases that  specifically engage these often marginalized populations and demonstrate promise for future ICT for peacebuilding programs.  We ground these case studies in theoretical constructs from the peacebuilding, security, and public health literatures in order to present a practical framework for developing such inclusive and innovative programming.  

Speakers

Monday May 16, 2016 16:45 - 17:30
Lioness

16:45

Open Schools Kenya
Limited Capacity seats available

Map Kibera made the invisible visible. Now Open Schools Kenya (www.openschoolskenya.org) is a project supported by Gates Foundation and implemented by Map Kibera Trust to try and make education information easily available, accessible and useful to everyone, focusing on Kibera as a pilot site. The project has seen around 350 schools mapped in Kibera including informal, private and public schools. The project aims to help parents make informed choices on which schools to take their children to depending on their capabilities and also preferences. Schools can also learn what other schools are doing hence healthy competition towards achieving the SDG number 4. And government now have the data for all the schools in Kibera and can use it for proper planning around education.  NGOs and donors can also use the website to fund or implement other educational programs in the area. The website gives each and every school  a profile page with details ranging from the population, programs offered, fees, contact info etc. 


Speakers
avatar for Joshua Ogure

Joshua Ogure

Project Coordinator, Map Kibera Trust
Joshua Ogure is the project coordinator for Map Kibera Trust, he coordinates the whole mapping team as well as the video team that is Kibera News Network. Ogure lead the Open Schools Kenya Project and resides in Kibera. He strives to make the invisible visible through the use of his... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 16:45 - 17:30
Giraffe 206

16:45

Systems Change: Real-Time Data for Agile, Responsible and Participatory Development
Limited Capacity seats available

There is an increasing call by the global development community for Aid to be more agile, contextual and inclusive as we recognize how complex the environments are that we operate within. Movements like Doing Development Differently, Thinking and Working Politically, Feedback Labs, #adaptdev and others are trying to push donors and implementors to be more adaptive and problem-driven. These efforts have contributed to major donor reforms such as DFID's Smart Rules, the World Bank's Science of Delivery and USAID's upcoming revisions to its Operations Policy and Program Cycle, as well as larger investments in Adaptive Management. These efforts will create a large demand for services and tools that that allow for a more participatory and agile approach to development -- a demand that the ICT4D community can be well positioned to meet.   

This session will present the larger landscape in development that is pushing for these systemic changes, and present a new initiative that USAID's Global Development Lab is launching to conceive, design, and test how real-time data systems can enable a more adaptive and participatory approach to development in complex settings. This initiative is not focused on adaptation or feedbacks for their own sake, but how decisions can be made in a more responsive, contextual and participatory fashion with access to relevant and usable data at the appropriate times. The initiative is also concerned with how to most appropriately integrate flow data to and from multiple agents and decision makers across the 'information supply chain' - including community members, frontline workers, mid-level managers, and government decision makers - to facilitate rapid operational assessments, adaptive and iterative learning through tight feedback loops throughout the implementation of program delivery, and M&E. The understanding of the power, agency and behavior of the various decision makers, as well as the governance applications that allow for more sustainable and adaptive programming models, will be integral to the success of this work for the ICT4D and broader development community.


Speakers
ZB

Zack Brisson

Principal, Reboot
Zack Brisson is a founder & principal at Reboot, a social enterprise dedicated to inclusive development and accountable governance. A practicing theorist, Zack has extensive experience bringing community-driven approaches to policymaking, program design, and implementation. At Reboot... Read More →
avatar for Samir Doshi

Samir Doshi

Senior Scientist, US Agency for International Development (USAID)
Dr. Samir K. Doshi is a Senior Scientist at USAID. Samir leads the Real-Time Data for Adaptive Management initiative at USAID's Global Development Lab, with a focus on how local communities can use digital technologies in complex environments to better monitor, evaluate, learn and... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 16:45 - 17:30
Cub
 
Tuesday, May 17
 

10:45

Budeshi: Linking Budget and Procurement Data to Public Services Using the OCDS
Limited Capacity seats available

Budeshi in Hausa means "open it" and it is a dedicated platform used to demonstrate the utility of the OCDS across the public procurement value chain. The platform seeks to structure budget and procurement data to the OCDS format; and this structure would enable the automated linking of budget and procurement data. In essence, the platform would make sense of the data by connecting them to the public infrastructure and services they represent.
The Budeshi project is premised on the fact that we can prevent some of the expensive corruption investigations and prosecutions as well as inefficiencies across the procurement value chain by deploying data standards that enable us link various data from the budget, to procurement and ultimately to public services in a timely and open way.
The Budeshi platform recognizes that no matter how structured data is, it is only brought to life when it is used to foster public engagement around a social issue that is of value to the people in question. Budeshi therefore has within it a visualization platform that enables individual user-interaction and engagement with the data. The platform therefore includes a blog where the visuals from the data (or the lack of it) are used to tell data driven stories within the context of pressing social and development issues. Additionally, budeshi has a radio program by the same name. All of these plugins are aimed at stimulating interest in the data and visualizations being developed; and use OCDS data to build a system of public accountability. The platform is located at http://www.budeshi.org.
The initiators of this platform are seeking its adoption by the Nigerian Government and seek to demonstrate its importance to achieving sustained development.
At the ICT4D conference, budeshi project initiators seek to demonstrate initial thoughts around the project, progress made and lessons learned. The initiators also would like to show that such a platform can be replicated across Africa to enable data-driven public accountability.
This presentation would be made by Seember Nyager of PPDC, and Patrick Enaholo of the Pan Atlantic University, school of media and communication, Lagos.

Speakers
avatar for Patrick Enaholo

Patrick Enaholo

Open Data Research Centre Director, Pan-Atlantic University
Patrick works at the Pan-Atlantic University in Lagos, Nigeria where he teaches and conducts research around the utilisation of digital media as tools for productivity across various segments of society. He is currently conducting research and leading the development of a number of... Read More →
SN

Seember Nyager

Chief Executive Officer, Public and Private Development Centre (Procurement Monitor)
Public and Private Development Centre (Procurement Monitor), Nigeria


Tuesday May 17, 2016 10:45 - 11:30
Giraffe 256

10:45

Global Goals for Local Impact - Lanet Umoja and Citizen Engagement to Implement the SDGs
Limited Capacity seats available

In this session we will be excited to talk about how the Global Goals can best become real and have tangible impact in the lives of every citizen. At the Open Institute we took the view that the Global Goals can best be achieved, if they are implemented at the most local level possible. We shall tell you about how we set about testing this together with Chief Francis Kariuki, the tweeting chief and how we worked with his community to own the SDGs at their level, how we had community leaders collect data for 7500 households and how this is impacting their lives. 

We shall share the lessons that we have learnt and the questions that have emerged in the course of our learning. 
  • Is there a different way of doing the census?
  • To what extent could government national planning decentralise?
  • What is the emerging role of the citizen as data producers?


Speakers
avatar for Al Kags

Al Kags

Founder / Trsutee, Open Institute
Al Kags is Founder and Trustee of Open Institute, and leads program direction. He is a Mandela Washington Fellow (2014) and was recognized as a New Generation African Leader (2013). In Kenya, Al has worked with the government to develop and implement ICT policy. He was responsible... Read More →


Tuesday May 17, 2016 10:45 - 11:30
Giraffe 253

10:45

Software Isn't Enough: Lessons Learned on Managing Change in Development Organizations
Limited Capacity full

Wired for Project Management

It's easy to get excited about new apps, systems, and technologies, including ones for project management. After all, international development is just a big collection of projects.
But, wait, what is project management, and what do we need to know about it to build better technology? It is a question we need to answer, because building the "right tool for the job" doesn't only involve technology but also, of course, people and incentives.

Speakers
avatar for Christian Smith

Christian Smith

Director, Customer Engagement, DevResults
Mr. Smith serves as DevResults' specialist on customer engagement, overseeing customer relations, tool adoption and usage, and product feedback. He was a Program Officer for USAID from 2005 to 2016, serving in Bolivia, Uganda, Mozambique, and Pakistan. His role was to bring coherence... Read More →


Tuesday May 17, 2016 10:45 - 11:30
Giraffe 255

10:45

Using Fair Tax as a Monitoring Tool
Limited Capacity seats available

Tax issues and poor governance issues hurting Ugandan economy
By Patrick Jaramogi
Uganda is a country with a very young population with the vast majority (65%) below the age of 18, and with an overwhelming percentage of people living below the poverty line of USD1.9 (UGX6, 175). It is therefore extremely urgent to rethink the fiscal system, the people who contribute to the revenue basket and who benefits from the collected revenues. The fact that the burden of taxation is carried mainly by the poor, while the rich enjoy the incentives cannot be ignored.

As a journalist who has been reported on Tax Justice and Governance, the issue of Fair Tax Monitor (FTM) is paramount in pursuit of revealing how fair or "regressive") Uganda's taxation system is. As I join others attending the ICTAD conference I need to underscore more study I have got as u report on these related issues. Basing on my winning of the inaugural Capacity for Research and Advocacy for Fair Taxation (CRAFT) OXFAM Journalism Award (2013), and attending the Tax Justice training organsied by Oxfam Novib and Tax Justice Network - Africa (TJN-A) in Naivasha Kenya, it is just imperative that I join and share my experience at this conference so we can get to the bottom of the Tax issues in Uganda.

Within the agreed common research framework mentioned above, the subsequent indicators were proposed to uncover the degree of fairness of the tax system: structure of tax system, distribution of tax burden and progressivity, revenue sufficiency, tax exemptions, effectiveness of the tax administration, government spending priorities and transparency and accountability. I anticipate that my experience and findings emanating from Uganda's contextual analysis will yield tangible impact in three areas: the citizens will be equipped to demand accountability from their duty bearers; the civil society will be provided a threshold against which to appreciate the country's taxation matters in the lens of "pro-poor-ness" to further advocacy campaigns; and finally that stakeholders, including government agencies, will have full grip on the taxation and expenditure gaps in order to influence policy decision processes.

Uganda's legal framework taxation system is well knitted in the supreme law of the Uganda - the constitution and support regulations that include Income Tax Act, VAT Act, Public Finance Management Act-2015, EAC customs tariff among others. The implementation of these regulations is mainstreamed through the central government with the lower governments providing a level of support on collection of some avenues such as ground rent, trading licenses etc.

Uganda's comprehensive and all around fiscal legal framework is properly documented as such being of great advantage, emphasis should therefore be put on the active implementation of the tax laws. Harmonization of institutional roles and responsibilities on some tax-heads is a necessity in the short and long run.
Let us take a look at the tax-head such as ground-tax by Local Governments, rental-tax by Central Government (URA) and property-tax by ethnic dynasty authorities (Kingdoms) has created elements of "double-taxation" in the eyes of taxpayers but also increased the burden on individuals.

In order to estimate the extent of the tax burden, taxes are isolated into two taxes (direct and direct taxes) in terms of taxes paid directly by the registered taxpayers or those transferred to the final consumer. Part of taking this direction of demarcation of taxes is so because of prevailing argument that direct taxes are more progressive in comparison to indirect taxes (consumption taxes) which tend to be regressive. In accordance to this argument, it is believed that direct taxes are a strong tool to test the progressivity and fairness of a tax system.

From this the descriptive analysis undertaken of Uganda's direct and indirect taxes, it was evident that the share of direct taxes (paid by companies and individuals directly) to total revenue in Uganda had increased by over 7 percentage points since FY 2005/06 and currently stood at 32 percent (with CIT contributing 17percent to overall revenue and PAYE 14percent). Indirect taxes on their side contributed 21percent and import taxes contributed 42.8percent in FY2014/15 alone. The glaring statistics depict Uganda's high dependency on international trade and the revenues arising therein making the country vulnerable to the shocks - this will curtail the domestic revenue mobilization sustainability in the long-run.

While the taxpayer register has grown from 17,083 in FY2009/10 to 762,809 representing a staff-to-taxpayer ratio of 1:357 (for only operational staff), the load on each staff is seemingly hefty. It is important therefore that the Uganda Revenue Authority lobbies for its institutional capacity building through increasing the numbers. The quality of the personnel should be bridged through intentional financing of in-depth specialised training in international taxation, transfer pricing, audit function to enable them deter and detect tax evasion and avoidance schemes

As earlier mentioned, there are critical improvement in Uganda's fiscal regulation and frameworks. What remains is for the government to see to it that the implementation of the papers is followed through from end-to-end. Instances where corruption has been perceived present in the tax-responsible offices, the institutions with the powers of execution against such abuse of office should take immediate action. The office of the Prime Minister, the Anti-Corruption Court, and Office of the Auditor General, Tax-tribunals, Commercial courts and many others should be approached by the whistle blowing agencies and individuals to minimize tendencies of bribery and corruption in the revenue collection.

The analysis conducted shows observable pronounced interest and commitment by the government to her social contract of prioritizing social and commitment service delivery however in the recent years the expenditure priorities have changed. The government of Uganda has shifted towards infrastructural development, especially in areas of mineral development, security, energy, roads, railway and other modes of transport. Whether or not this poses a risk to widening service delivery gaps (in Health, Education, Agriculture and Social protection), time will tell but likely so.

Based on the resource envelope and respective allocations, the country has been lagging behind on the actualization on a set of international commitments and ratifications. These include: the Maputo 2000 declaration (10 percent to Agriculture- yet only 2.9 percent of the budget was appropriated in FY 2013/14), Abuja declaration (15 percent to health, yet only 8.9 percent was allocated in FY 2013/14), Dakar framework (Education for All), etc. It is important that country falls back to the commitments made in the ratifications since the government and her people are held accountable

The first layer of accountability and transparency is availing accessible information and based on this indication , there are tangible improvements. Tax-matter appointed bodies have endeavored to share information although the gaps are widening on the authenticity of the data in terms of quality, integrity and updated-ness of such information or data. Although the channel may be accessible by the minority and on the premise that most information is untranslated into understandable basic language local or otherwise, the information may not be as useful. Uganda Revenue Authority has shown presence in the media and has been engaged through ta-hubs/clinics within communities to ensure that enough information is shared.

By law, the revenue authority is required to be audited by the office of the Auditor general in as much as it has built its internal audit capacity. The extent to which the results of the audits are published remains wanting and further follow-ups on emanating issues by Parliament and cabinet also continue

Speakers
avatar for Patrick Jaramogi Okech

Patrick Jaramogi Okech

Editor/Senior Reporter, The Investigator
Patrick Jaramogi has a degree in Mass Communication and Public Relations, a Masters in International Relations and holds a Diploma in Education Management and various certificates in Investigative Reporting, among others. He has worked as a reporter in Uganda's Leading Independent... Read More →


Tuesday May 17, 2016 10:45 - 11:30
Giraffe 257

11:30

Budeshi: Linking Budget and Procurement Data to Public Services Using the OCDS
Limited Capacity seats available

Budeshi in Hausa means "open it" and it is a dedicated platform used to demonstrate the utility of the OCDS across the public procurement value chain. The platform seeks to structure budget and procurement data to the OCDS format; and this structure would enable the automated linking of budget and procurement data. In essence, the platform would make sense of the data by connecting them to the public infrastructure and services they represent.
The Budeshi project is premised on the fact that we can prevent some of the expensive corruption investigations and prosecutions as well as inefficiencies across the procurement value chain by deploying data standards that enable us link various data from the budget, to procurement and ultimately to public services in a timely and open way.
The Budeshi platform recognizes that no matter how structured data is, it is only brought to life when it is used to foster public engagement around a social issue that is of value to the people in question. Budeshi therefore has within it a visualization platform that enables individual user-interaction and engagement with the data. The platform therefore includes a blog where the visuals from the data (or the lack of it) are used to tell data driven stories within the context of pressing social and development issues. Additionally, budeshi has a radio program by the same name. All of these plugins are aimed at stimulating interest in the data and visualizations being developed; and use OCDS data to build a system of public accountability. The platform is located at http://www.budeshi.org.
The initiators of this platform are seeking its adoption by the Nigerian Government and seek to demonstrate its importance to achieving sustained development.
At the ICT4D conference, budeshi project initiators seek to demonstrate initial thoughts around the project, progress made and lessons learned. The initiators also would like to show that such a platform can be replicated across Africa to enable data-driven public accountability.
This presentation would be made by Seember Nyager of PPDC, and Patrick Enaholo of the Pan Atlantic University, school of media and communication, Lagos.

Speakers
avatar for Patrick Enaholo

Patrick Enaholo

Open Data Research Centre Director, Pan-Atlantic University
Patrick works at the Pan-Atlantic University in Lagos, Nigeria where he teaches and conducts research around the utilisation of digital media as tools for productivity across various segments of society. He is currently conducting research and leading the development of a number of... Read More →
SN

Seember Nyager

Chief Executive Officer, Public and Private Development Centre (Procurement Monitor)
Public and Private Development Centre (Procurement Monitor), Nigeria


Tuesday May 17, 2016 11:30 - 12:15
Giraffe 256

11:30

Global Goals for Local Impact - Lanet Umoja and Citizen Engagement to Implement the SDGs
Limited Capacity seats available

If ordinary citizens are to be involved in the delivery of the SDGs, the conversation must be located around their circumstances. Though technology has become ubiquitous in sub-saharan Africa, it has not been widely used for improved governance and citizen participation. Citizens have a voice and will use it if given the opportunity, and if they think it can do some good, when they believe the right authorities are listening and could act on their ideas. Just making data available will not result in demand and use of the data. Data must be relevant, and locally relevant strategies are necessary to make the data available and spark stakeholder interaction. This presentation will look at local actors in Lanet Umoja to use data and ICTs to make the SDGs relevant and achievable at the local level.

Speakers
avatar for Al Kags

Al Kags

Founder / Trsutee, Open Institute
Al Kags is Founder and Trustee of Open Institute, and leads program direction. He is a Mandela Washington Fellow (2014) and was recognized as a New Generation African Leader (2013). In Kenya, Al has worked with the government to develop and implement ICT policy. He was responsible... Read More →


Tuesday May 17, 2016 11:30 - 12:15
Giraffe 253

11:30

Implementing ICT4D in Complex Multiple Emergencies
Limited Capacity seats available

The Jonglei Food Security Program (JFSP) is a Title II program funded by United States Agency for International Development (USAID) Food for Peace (FFP) and implemented by a consortium led by Catholic Relief Services (CRS) with Save the Children International (SCI) and government stakeholders. The program is implemented in Jonglei State, South Sudan. After decades of war with The Sudan, South Sudan finally seceded and got its independence in 2011. Jonglei State, and pretty much of the whole country is characterized by poor roads, dilapidated infrastructure, lack of electricity in the grid and limited amenities. In December 2013, a political violent conflict broke out, which took an ethnic dimension in the state, diving the state where the program is run, into government and opposition controlled areas adding further challenges for implementation in an already difficult terrain. JFSP employed the use of information communication technologies (ICT) to ease on the logistics challenges associated with implementing a food security project in a conflict situation with very limited infrastructure. The program trained over 50 MEAL and program staff on using ipads for data collection on the i-formbuilder platform and has been using the technology to collect registration, monitoring and survey data on food for asset, agriculture, livestock, water and sanitation and nutrition programs. Field teams sync their data to the server as soon as they came from the field and the data would be immediately available for downloading, analysis and reporting. Use of ipads in the South Sudan context allowed JFSP to collect real time data, produce timely reports and improve efficiency in serving the conflict affected communities. It has revolutionized data collection and significantly improved data quality. The program managed to draw lessons and best practices on the use of mobile technologies in a conflict situation with limited infrastructure, which go beyond the ICT gadgets but incorporate the human element.

Speakers
avatar for Rodwell Masocha Sibanda

Rodwell Masocha Sibanda

MEAL Manager, Catholic Relief Services South Sudan
Rodwell Masocha Sibanda is a CRS Monitoring, Evaluation, Accountability and Learning (MEAL) manager and leads the USAID-funded Jonglei Food Security Program consortium MEAL department. He has been in South Sudan since 2010, and has been with the JFSP since inception in 2011. He was... Read More →



Tuesday May 17, 2016 11:30 - 12:15
Giraffe 258

11:30

Software Isn't Enough: Lessons Learned on Managing Change in Development Organizations
Limited Capacity full

Wired for Project Management

It's easy to get excited about new apps, systems, and technologies, including ones for project management. After all, international development is just a big collection of projects.
But, wait, what is project management, and what do we need to know about it to build better technology? It is a question we need to answer, because building the "right tool for the job" doesn't only involve technology but also, of course, people and incentives.

Speakers
avatar for Christian Smith

Christian Smith

Director, Customer Engagement, DevResults
Mr. Smith serves as DevResults' specialist on customer engagement, overseeing customer relations, tool adoption and usage, and product feedback. He was a Program Officer for USAID from 2005 to 2016, serving in Bolivia, Uganda, Mozambique, and Pakistan. His role was to bring coherence... Read More →


Tuesday May 17, 2016 11:30 - 12:15
Giraffe 255

11:30

Using Fair Tax as a Monitoring Tool
Limited Capacity seats available

Tax issues and poor governance issues hurting Ugandan economy
By Patrick Jaramogi
Uganda is a country with a very young population with the vast majority (65%) below the age of 18, and with an overwhelming percentage of people living below the poverty line of USD1.9 (UGX6, 175). It is therefore extremely urgent to rethink the fiscal system, the people who contribute to the revenue basket and who benefits from the collected revenues. The fact that the burden of taxation is carried mainly by the poor, while the rich enjoy the incentives cannot be ignored.

As a journalist who has been reported on Tax Justice and Governance, the issue of Fair Tax Monitor (FTM) is paramount in pursuit of revealing how fair or "regressive") Uganda's taxation system is. As I join others attending the ICTAD conference I need to underscore more study I have got as u report on these related issues. Basing on my winning of the inaugural Capacity for Research and Advocacy for Fair Taxation (CRAFT) OXFAM Journalism Award (2013), and attending the Tax Justice training organsied by Oxfam Novib and Tax Justice Network - Africa (TJN-A) in Naivasha Kenya, it is just imperative that I join and share my experience at this conference so we can get to the bottom of the Tax issues in Uganda.

Within the agreed common research framework mentioned above, the subsequent indicators were proposed to uncover the degree of fairness of the tax system: structure of tax system, distribution of tax burden and progressivity, revenue sufficiency, tax exemptions, effectiveness of the tax administration, government spending priorities and transparency and accountability. I anticipate that my experience and findings emanating from Uganda's contextual analysis will yield tangible impact in three areas: the citizens will be equipped to demand accountability from their duty bearers; the civil society will be provided a threshold against which to appreciate the country's taxation matters in the lens of "pro-poor-ness" to further advocacy campaigns; and finally that stakeholders, including government agencies, will have full grip on the taxation and expenditure gaps in order to influence policy decision processes.

Uganda's legal framework taxation system is well knitted in the supreme law of the Uganda - the constitution and support regulations that include Income Tax Act, VAT Act, Public Finance Management Act-2015, EAC customs tariff among others. The implementation of these regulations is mainstreamed through the central government with the lower governments providing a level of support on collection of some avenues such as ground rent, trading licenses etc.

Uganda's comprehensive and all around fiscal legal framework is properly documented as such being of great advantage, emphasis should therefore be put on the active implementation of the tax laws. Harmonization of institutional roles and responsibilities on some tax-heads is a necessity in the short and long run.
Let us take a look at the tax-head such as ground-tax by Local Governments, rental-tax by Central Government (URA) and property-tax by ethnic dynasty authorities (Kingdoms) has created elements of "double-taxation" in the eyes of taxpayers but also increased the burden on individuals.

In order to estimate the extent of the tax burden, taxes are isolated into two taxes (direct and direct taxes) in terms of taxes paid directly by the registered taxpayers or those transferred to the final consumer. Part of taking this direction of demarcation of taxes is so because of prevailing argument that direct taxes are more progressive in comparison to indirect taxes (consumption taxes) which tend to be regressive. In accordance to this argument, it is believed that direct taxes are a strong tool to test the progressivity and fairness of a tax system.

From this the descriptive analysis undertaken of Uganda's direct and indirect taxes, it was evident that the share of direct taxes (paid by companies and individuals directly) to total revenue in Uganda had increased by over 7 percentage points since FY 2005/06 and currently stood at 32 percent (with CIT contributing 17percent to overall revenue and PAYE 14percent). Indirect taxes on their side contributed 21percent and import taxes contributed 42.8percent in FY2014/15 alone. The glaring statistics depict Uganda's high dependency on international trade and the revenues arising therein making the country vulnerable to the shocks - this will curtail the domestic revenue mobilization sustainability in the long-run.

While the taxpayer register has grown from 17,083 in FY2009/10 to 762,809 representing a staff-to-taxpayer ratio of 1:357 (for only operational staff), the load on each staff is seemingly hefty. It is important therefore that the Uganda Revenue Authority lobbies for its institutional capacity building through increasing the numbers. The quality of the personnel should be bridged through intentional financing of in-depth specialised training in international taxation, transfer pricing, audit function to enable them deter and detect tax evasion and avoidance schemes

As earlier mentioned, there are critical improvement in Uganda's fiscal regulation and frameworks. What remains is for the government to see to it that the implementation of the papers is followed through from end-to-end. Instances where corruption has been perceived present in the tax-responsible offices, the institutions with the powers of execution against such abuse of office should take immediate action. The office of the Prime Minister, the Anti-Corruption Court, and Office of the Auditor General, Tax-tribunals, Commercial courts and many others should be approached by the whistle blowing agencies and individuals to minimize tendencies of bribery and corruption in the revenue collection.

The analysis conducted shows observable pronounced interest and commitment by the government to her social contract of prioritizing social and commitment service delivery however in the recent years the expenditure priorities have changed. The government of Uganda has shifted towards infrastructural development, especially in areas of mineral development, security, energy, roads, railway and other modes of transport. Whether or not this poses a risk to widening service delivery gaps (in Health, Education, Agriculture and Social protection), time will tell but likely so.

Based on the resource envelope and respective allocations, the country has been lagging behind on the actualization on a set of international commitments and ratifications. These include: the Maputo 2000 declaration (10 percent to Agriculture- yet only 2.9 percent of the budget was appropriated in FY 2013/14), Abuja declaration (15 percent to health, yet only 8.9 percent was allocated in FY 2013/14), Dakar framework (Education for All), etc. It is important that country falls back to the commitments made in the ratifications since the government and her people are held accountable

The first layer of accountability and transparency is availing accessible information and based on this indication , there are tangible improvements. Tax-matter appointed bodies have endeavored to share information although the gaps are widening on the authenticity of the data in terms of quality, integrity and updated-ness of such information or data. Although the channel may be accessible by the minority and on the premise that most information is untranslated into understandable basic language local or otherwise, the information may not be as useful. Uganda Revenue Authority has shown presence in the media and has been engaged through ta-hubs/clinics within communities to ensure that enough information is shared.

By law, the revenue authority is required to be audited by the office of the Auditor general in as much as it has built its internal audit capacity. The extent to which the results of the audits are published remains wanting and further follow-ups on emanating issues by Parliament and cabinet also continue

Speakers
avatar for Patrick Jaramogi Okech

Patrick Jaramogi Okech

Editor/Senior Reporter, The Investigator
Patrick Jaramogi has a degree in Mass Communication and Public Relations, a Masters in International Relations and holds a Diploma in Education Management and various certificates in Investigative Reporting, among others. He has worked as a reporter in Uganda's Leading Independent... Read More →


Tuesday May 17, 2016 11:30 - 12:15
Giraffe 257

12:15

Budeshi: Linking Budget and Procurement Data to Public Services Using the OCDS
Limited Capacity seats available

Budeshi in Hausa means "open it" and it is a dedicated platform used to demonstrate the utility of the OCDS across the public procurement value chain. The platform seeks to structure budget and procurement data to the OCDS format; and this structure would enable the automated linking of budget and procurement data. In essence, the platform would make sense of the data by connecting them to the public infrastructure and services they represent.
The Budeshi project is premised on the fact that we can prevent some of the expensive corruption investigations and prosecutions as well as inefficiencies across the procurement value chain by deploying data standards that enable us link various data from the budget, to procurement and ultimately to public services in a timely and open way.
The Budeshi platform recognizes that no matter how structured data is, it is only brought to life when it is used to foster public engagement around a social issue that is of value to the people in question. Budeshi therefore has within it a visualization platform that enables individual user-interaction and engagement with the data. The platform therefore includes a blog where the visuals from the data (or the lack of it) are used to tell data driven stories within the context of pressing social and development issues. Additionally, budeshi has a radio program by the same name. All of these plugins are aimed at stimulating interest in the data and visualizations being developed; and use OCDS data to build a system of public accountability. The platform is located at http://www.budeshi.org.
The initiators of this platform are seeking its adoption by the Nigerian Government and seek to demonstrate its importance to achieving sustained development.
At the ICT4D conference, budeshi project initiators seek to demonstrate initial thoughts around the project, progress made and lessons learned. The initiators also would like to show that such a platform can be replicated across Africa to enable data-driven public accountability.
This presentation would be made by Seember Nyager of PPDC, and Patrick Enaholo of the Pan Atlantic University, school of media and communication, Lagos.

Speakers
SN

Seember Nyager

Chief Executive Officer, Public and Private Development Centre (Procurement Monitor)
Public and Private Development Centre (Procurement Monitor), Nigeria


Tuesday May 17, 2016 12:15 - 13:00
Giraffe 256

12:15

Systems Change: Real-Time Data for Agile, Responsible and Participatory Development
Limited Capacity full

There is an increasing call by the global development community for Aid to be more agile, contextual and inclusive as we recognize how complex the environments are that we operate within. Movements like Doing Development Differently, Thinking and Working Politically, Feedback Labs, #adaptdev and others are trying to push donors and implementors to be more adaptive and problem-driven. These efforts have contributed to major donor reforms such as DFID's Smart Rules, the World Bank's Science of Delivery and USAID's upcoming revisions to its Operations Policy and Program Cycle, as well as larger investments in Adaptive Management. These efforts will create a large demand for services and tools that that allow for a more participatory and agile approach to development -- a demand that the ICT4D community can be well positioned to meet.   

This session will present the larger landscape in development that is pushing for these systemic changes, and present a new initiative that USAID's Global Development Lab is launching to conceive, design, and test how real-time data systems can enable a more adaptive and participatory approach to development in complex settings. This initiative is not focused on adaptation or feedbacks for their own sake, but how decisions can be made in a more responsive, contextual and participatory fashion with access to relevant and usable data at the appropriate times. The initiative is also concerned with how to most appropriately integrate flow data to and from multiple agents and decision makers across the 'information supply chain' - including community members, frontline workers, mid-level managers, and government decision makers - to facilitate rapid operational assessments, adaptive and iterative learning through tight feedback loops throughout the implementation of program delivery, and M&E. The understanding of the power, agency and behavior of the various decision makers, as well as the governance applications that allow for more sustainable and adaptive programming models, will be integral to the success of this work for the ICT4D and broader development community.


Speakers
ZB

Zack Brisson

Principal, Reboot
Zack Brisson is a founder & principal at Reboot, a social enterprise dedicated to inclusive development and accountable governance. A practicing theorist, Zack has extensive experience bringing community-driven approaches to policymaking, program design, and implementation. At Reboot... Read More →
avatar for Samir Doshi

Samir Doshi

Senior Scientist, US Agency for International Development (USAID)
Dr. Samir K. Doshi is a Senior Scientist at USAID. Samir leads the Real-Time Data for Adaptive Management initiative at USAID's Global Development Lab, with a focus on how local communities can use digital technologies in complex environments to better monitor, evaluate, learn and... Read More →


Tuesday May 17, 2016 12:15 - 13:00
Giraffe 255

12:15

Tracking Implementation to Ensure Inclusion in the SDGs: How Can ICTs Help?
Limited Capacity full

ICTs enhance our capabilities to measure progress towards the SDGs; evaluate approaches and methods used to achieve them; learn what is/is not working, where, and for whom; and improve our capacity for improved and more timely decision making. At this participatory roundtable discussion, we will explore the importance of conducting high quality and appropriate M&E on ICT4D programs to identify promising and inclusive practices and approaches and how they contribute to the achievement of the SDGs. We'll also explore the role of ICTs in supporting improved M&E processes.

Panelists will share their experiences, examples and tools for a) enhancing inclusion and voice of marginalized individuals and groups in the M&E process; b) adapting traditional M&E approaches (such as the OECD-DAC criteria) to ICT4D programming; c) using ICT tools and digital data to prepare for program evaluation with a focus on inclusion; d) developing ICT-enabled dashboards to improve local decision-making and program impact. We'll encourage participants to share their own experiences, challenges and good practice in a lively session that will stimulate dialogue and debate.

Moderators
avatar for Linda Raftree

Linda Raftree

Organizer, MERL Tech
Linda Raftree supports strategy, program design, research, and technology in international development initiatives. She co-founded MERLTech in 2014 and also works as an independent consultant. Linda advises Girl Effect on digital safety, security and privacy and supports the organization... Read More →

Speakers
KB

Kecia Bertermann

Director, Digital Research and Learning, Girl Effect
Kecia Bertermann oversees research and learning for Girl Effect's digital portfolio. Kecia is a mixed-methods researcher with a thematic focus on adolescent girls and the intersection of digital technologies and behaviour change. Her career has spanned analogue and digital research... Read More →
VO

Valerie Oliphant

Projects Manager, Social Impact Lab (SIMLab)
Valerie is a Project Director at SIMLab, where she helps organizations and individuals use inclusive technologies to improve systems and services. She's passionate about advancing social equality with a commitment to reflective practice and continuous learning. Prior to joining SIMLab... Read More →
avatar for Paul Perrin

Paul Perrin

Director for Monitoring, Evaluation, Accountability and Learning, Catholic Relief Services
Paul Perrin is the Director for Monitoring, Evaluation, Accountability, and Learning at Catholic Relief Services (CRS) and serves as Adjunct Faculty at the University of Notre Dame. His work at CRS has largely focused on supporting country programs in conceptualizing, designing, implementing... Read More →


Tuesday May 17, 2016 12:15 - 13:00
Giraffe 253

12:15

Using Fair Tax as a Monitoring Tool
Limited Capacity seats available

Tax issues and poor governance issues hurting Ugandan economy
By Patrick Jaramogi
Uganda is a country with a very young population with the vast majority (65%) below the age of 18, and with an overwhelming percentage of people living below the poverty line of USD1.9 (UGX6, 175). It is therefore extremely urgent to rethink the fiscal system, the people who contribute to the revenue basket and who benefits from the collected revenues. The fact that the burden of taxation is carried mainly by the poor, while the rich enjoy the incentives cannot be ignored.

As a journalist who has been reported on Tax Justice and Governance, the issue of Fair Tax Monitor (FTM) is paramount in pursuit of revealing how fair or "regressive") Uganda's taxation system is. As I join others attending the ICTAD conference I need to underscore more study I have got as u report on these related issues. Basing on my winning of the inaugural Capacity for Research and Advocacy for Fair Taxation (CRAFT) OXFAM Journalism Award (2013), and attending the Tax Justice training organsied by Oxfam Novib and Tax Justice Network - Africa (TJN-A) in Naivasha Kenya, it is just imperative that I join and share my experience at this conference so we can get to the bottom of the Tax issues in Uganda.

Within the agreed common research framework mentioned above, the subsequent indicators were proposed to uncover the degree of fairness of the tax system: structure of tax system, distribution of tax burden and progressivity, revenue sufficiency, tax exemptions, effectiveness of the tax administration, government spending priorities and transparency and accountability. I anticipate that my experience and findings emanating from Uganda's contextual analysis will yield tangible impact in three areas: the citizens will be equipped to demand accountability from their duty bearers; the civil society will be provided a threshold against which to appreciate the country's taxation matters in the lens of "pro-poor-ness" to further advocacy campaigns; and finally that stakeholders, including government agencies, will have full grip on the taxation and expenditure gaps in order to influence policy decision processes.

Uganda's legal framework taxation system is well knitted in the supreme law of the Uganda - the constitution and support regulations that include Income Tax Act, VAT Act, Public Finance Management Act-2015, EAC customs tariff among others. The implementation of these regulations is mainstreamed through the central government with the lower governments providing a level of support on collection of some avenues such as ground rent, trading licenses etc.

Uganda's comprehensive and all around fiscal legal framework is properly documented as such being of great advantage, emphasis should therefore be put on the active implementation of the tax laws. Harmonization of institutional roles and responsibilities on some tax-heads is a necessity in the short and long run.
Let us take a look at the tax-head such as ground-tax by Local Governments, rental-tax by Central Government (URA) and property-tax by ethnic dynasty authorities (Kingdoms) has created elements of "double-taxation" in the eyes of taxpayers but also increased the burden on individuals.

In order to estimate the extent of the tax burden, taxes are isolated into two taxes (direct and direct taxes) in terms of taxes paid directly by the registered taxpayers or those transferred to the final consumer. Part of taking this direction of demarcation of taxes is so because of prevailing argument that direct taxes are more progressive in comparison to indirect taxes (consumption taxes) which tend to be regressive. In accordance to this argument, it is believed that direct taxes are a strong tool to test the progressivity and fairness of a tax system.

From this the descriptive analysis undertaken of Uganda's direct and indirect taxes, it was evident that the share of direct taxes (paid by companies and individuals directly) to total revenue in Uganda had increased by over 7 percentage points since FY 2005/06 and currently stood at 32 percent (with CIT contributing 17percent to overall revenue and PAYE 14percent). Indirect taxes on their side contributed 21percent and import taxes contributed 42.8percent in FY2014/15 alone. The glaring statistics depict Uganda's high dependency on international trade and the revenues arising therein making the country vulnerable to the shocks - this will curtail the domestic revenue mobilization sustainability in the long-run.

While the taxpayer register has grown from 17,083 in FY2009/10 to 762,809 representing a staff-to-taxpayer ratio of 1:357 (for only operational staff), the load on each staff is seemingly hefty. It is important therefore that the Uganda Revenue Authority lobbies for its institutional capacity building through increasing the numbers. The quality of the personnel should be bridged through intentional financing of in-depth specialised training in international taxation, transfer pricing, audit function to enable them deter and detect tax evasion and avoidance schemes

As earlier mentioned, there are critical improvement in Uganda's fiscal regulation and frameworks. What remains is for the government to see to it that the implementation of the papers is followed through from end-to-end. Instances where corruption has been perceived present in the tax-responsible offices, the institutions with the powers of execution against such abuse of office should take immediate action. The office of the Prime Minister, the Anti-Corruption Court, and Office of the Auditor General, Tax-tribunals, Commercial courts and many others should be approached by the whistle blowing agencies and individuals to minimize tendencies of bribery and corruption in the revenue collection.

The analysis conducted shows observable pronounced interest and commitment by the government to her social contract of prioritizing social and commitment service delivery however in the recent years the expenditure priorities have changed. The government of Uganda has shifted towards infrastructural development, especially in areas of mineral development, security, energy, roads, railway and other modes of transport. Whether or not this poses a risk to widening service delivery gaps (in Health, Education, Agriculture and Social protection), time will tell but likely so.

Based on the resource envelope and respective allocations, the country has been lagging behind on the actualization on a set of international commitments and ratifications. These include: the Maputo 2000 declaration (10 percent to Agriculture- yet only 2.9 percent of the budget was appropriated in FY 2013/14), Abuja declaration (15 percent to health, yet only 8.9 percent was allocated in FY 2013/14), Dakar framework (Education for All), etc. It is important that country falls back to the commitments made in the ratifications since the government and her people are held accountable

The first layer of accountability and transparency is availing accessible information and based on this indication , there are tangible improvements. Tax-matter appointed bodies have endeavored to share information although the gaps are widening on the authenticity of the data in terms of quality, integrity and updated-ness of such information or data. Although the channel may be accessible by the minority and on the premise that most information is untranslated into understandable basic language local or otherwise, the information may not be as useful. Uganda Revenue Authority has shown presence in the media and has been engaged through ta-hubs/clinics within communities to ensure that enough information is shared.

By law, the revenue authority is required to be audited by the office of the Auditor general in as much as it has built its internal audit capacity. The extent to which the results of the audits are published remains wanting and further follow-ups on emanating issues by Parliament and cabinet also continue

Speakers
avatar for Patrick Jaramogi Okech

Patrick Jaramogi Okech

Editor/Senior Reporter, The Investigator
Patrick Jaramogi has a degree in Mass Communication and Public Relations, a Masters in International Relations and holds a Diploma in Education Management and various certificates in Investigative Reporting, among others. He has worked as a reporter in Uganda's Leading Independent... Read More →


Tuesday May 17, 2016 12:15 - 13:00
Giraffe 257

12:15

Using Mobile to Gather Citizen Views on the SDGs in Tanzania
Limited Capacity seats available

Citizen Engagement and education is an important element in many development projects. With feedback from citizens, organizations or governments can learn how to better target public awareness campaigns, find out what messages are getting through, and obtain vital information on the public's reaction to a local or international initiative. With the launch of the Sustainable Development Goals in 2015, many local agencies are looking for guidance on what goals to prioritize, and direct feedback from citizens is extremely valuable. In the past it has been difficult to quickly reach a large group of citizens across a country, but the prevalence of ICTs and particularly mobile phones is changing that. In December 2015, the UN Tanzania and mobile surveying platform GeoPoll worked together to educate Tanzanians on the SDGs and gather feedback from a select group. This two-staged project first used SMS messages to raise awareness of the SDGs. In just 3 days, GeoPoll and UN Tanzania reached a group of 88,000 Tanzanians in specific states, texting them a list of all the SDGs in order to educate the public on the goals. From this original group, 2,000 received a follow-up survey on which SDG was most important to them. This allowed UN Tanzania to further understand what activities to prioritize in Tanzania. Results showed that ending poverty was the most important SDG to 30% of respondents, followed by implementing the global partnership for sustainable development (13%), promoting peace (11%) and ensuring inclusive education (9%). Without the use of ICTs and the prevalence of mobiles this important feedback would have been nearly impossible to gather, and the 88,000 Tanzanians would not have been educated on the SDGs and their importance.

Speakers
JM

John Muthee

Vice President, Business Development in Africa, GeoPoll
John Muthee is the Vice President of Business Development, Africa, at GeoPoll, where he oversees GeoPoll’s Africa-based sales team and engages with clients to identify needs for mobile surveying research in the international development and commercial sectors. A leader in market... Read More →


Tuesday May 17, 2016 12:15 - 13:00
Giraffe 258

14:00

Accountability Using IATI: A Local Perspective
Limited Capacity seats available

Transparency in the development aid sector has seen a significant rise in the last years, mainly due to global commitment to the open data IATI XML standard. Last year alone, a staggering amount of USD78B was reported to IATI by approx. 380 donors, NGO's, philanthropist and private entities.

The global development aid community is aware of the potential impact IATI has on accountability, transparency, monitoring and evaluation. While efforts have risen to move IATI from a donor perspective to a local level, true local access to this pool of open data is virtually non-existent.

Donors themselves have been investing heavily in ICT tools that enable IATI data to be transformed, exported and re-used, but no significant use cases have arisen that provide local communities with easy to use tools to review, monitor and evaluate development aid activities in their context. This must change.

IATI Studio will make it easy to publish, visualize and use data. A simple web-based interface allows users granular selection, filtering and analysis of development projects related to their community. It aims to provide a simple Responder Tool, enabling local communities to comment and respond if traced projects have not started or promised results are not being met. The local communities will be able to tell their story, re-use the data and hold duty bearers accountable in the IATI chain.

IATI Studio is an imitative by Zimmerman & Zimmerman, Oxfam Novib and Leiden University.

Speakers
avatar for Siem Vaessen (Zimmerman & Zimmerman)

Siem Vaessen (Zimmerman & Zimmerman)

Managing Director, Zimmerman & Zimmerman
Mr. Vaessen is CEO at Zimmerman & Zimmerman, an open-source data and visualization company based in Amsterdam, The Netherlands. He serves as technical liaison to the efforts made by Zimmerman & Zimmerman to maintain a sustainable data-engine, enabling organisations like DfiD, UNESCO... Read More →



Tuesday May 17, 2016 14:00 - 14:45
Giraffe 257

14:00

Complications during Pregnancy in Uganda: Researching Socio-Cultural Drivers Using ICTs
Limited Capacity seats available

Every day, nearly 830 women die from preventable causes related to pregnancy and childbirth across the globe, with more than half of these deaths occurring in Sub-Saharan Africa (WHO, 2015). Socio-cultural factors such as traditional beliefs about pregnancy, play an important role alongside biological/genetic factors and provision of healthcare, in maternal mortality rates. Beliefs, attitudes and norms influence local practices, and whether problematic symptoms are detected and appropriate timely healthcare is sought.
This presentation discusses the method and main findings of a pilot undertaken in 2015 by researchers from the Africa's Voices Foundation, University of Cambridge and Makarere University in Uganda, aimed at understanding the collective beliefs of women in the Central region of Uganda related to complications during and just after pregnancy.
Collaborating with local and national radio stations, we set up a series of interactive radio discussions featuring testimonials of women who had experienced pre-eclampsia. The discussions sparked the interest of diverse audiences who were invited to send their opinions via SMS to a toll-free number. The merits and limitations of combining mobile phones and old media (radio) to reach less accessible populations in the context of health research in Africa will also be discussed. Understanding the norms and beliefs held by different groups and communities is crucial to shape context-specific health interventions focused on improving the quality of medical and social support for Ugandan women during pregnancy.

Speakers
avatar for Dr. Claudia Lopes

Dr. Claudia Lopes

Head of Research and Innovation, Africa's Voices Foundation
Claudia is Head of Research at Africa's Voices Foundation, a spin-out from the University of Cambridge, UK. Claudia has several years of experience working in Africa on research projects related to new technologies and radio audiences interactivity. She is trained as social psychologist... Read More →



Tuesday May 17, 2016 14:00 - 14:45
Giraffe 255

14:00

e-Parliament, Legislative Tracking System and Increase Transparency with ICT
Limited Capacity seats available

System Objective - e-Parliament
Nowadays there is an increased tendency of using the Information and communication technologies (ICT) as essential tools in supporting the work of legislative bodies throughout the world. ICT has become sophisticated and flexible enough to assist the parliaments in their most important responsibilities: making laws and communicating with the citizens. The potential for the IT to significantly enhance the way that the Parliaments conduct their processes and operations is now more evident than ever before.
The Parliaments, as the legislative body in a young democratic country must be able to harness ICT in order to be more representative, transparent, accessible, accountable and effective.
The e-Parliament is considered as a continually evolving concept that is embedded in the institutional approach to modern technologies in the complex parliamentary environment. In order to empower the legislature in the Parliaments through ICT, this project makes not only assessment of the IT infrastructure, but also of the legislative and administrative rules and procedures in the Assembly. The objective is not just to employ new technologies, but also to integrate those technologies in the existing rules and procedures.

Goals and objectives
At the moment there is an increased tendency of using the Information and communication technologies (ICT) as essential tools in supporting the work of legislative bodies throughout the world. ICT has become sophisticated and flexible enough to assist the parliaments in their most important responsibilities making laws and communicating with the citizens.
The challenge for Parliaments are to continually embrace the opportunities that the information technology provides and ensure that citizen's expectations are met, while at the same time ensuring program and cost effectiveness.
There are many reasons why parliaments should consider harnessing ICT in their everyday operations:
- to be more representative,
- to be more transparent,
- to be more accessible,
- to be more accountable
- to be more effective in their many functions.

Speakers
avatar for Vullnet Kabashi

Vullnet Kabashi

Head of IT, Assembly of the Republic of Kosovo
In 1999, Vullnet Kabashi joined Catholic Relief Services's CRS emergency team in Kukes Albania, he continued to work as MIS/IT officer in CRS Kosovo until 2008. He worked as associate professor of Computer Science in University of Prishtina. Currently, Vullnet is Head of IT in the... Read More →



Tuesday May 17, 2016 14:00 - 14:45
Giraffe 256

14:00

Have we Moved the Needle at all? Thoughts from ICTD and Gender experts with a Kenya Lens (1.5 Hours)
Limited Capacity seats available

4 organizations and efforts focused on women's and girls' empowerment through ICTD in Kenya (and beyond) will talk a little about their unique efforts, but focus more on the gaps that participants face after the program. What really happens when women and girls "graduate?" Can we check off Sustainable Development Goal 5.b -- Enhance the use of enabling technology, in particular information and communications technology, to promote the empowerment of women? Have we done "development?" And why are there so many separate efforts? Should we be working like a pipeline? We will discuss how realistic is that given funding agendas, biases of implementers, national policy, and local culture... as well as the role of technology to encompass and bridge some of these stressors.

Moderators
avatar for Revi Sterling

Revi Sterling

Deputy Chief of Party, NetHope
Dr. Revi Sterling is Deputy Chief of Party for the USAID-GBI alliance at NetHope. She manages the Women and the Web Alliance - a multi-partner effort in Kenya and Nigeria - as part of her portfolio of ICTD applications for GBI. Prior to NetHope, Revi started and directed the first... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Phillip Chikwiramakomo

Phillip Chikwiramakomo

East Africa Program Manager, Samaschool
Phillip oversees the implementation of Samaschool in East Africa, including partner recruitment, on-boarding and management. Previously, Phillip served as the Global Platform Manager for Action Aid Denmark, in Nairobi. He has over 15 years of experience working in the UK, East Africa... Read More →
GG

Grace Githaiga

Field Coordinator, NetHope
Grace Githaiga currently consulting for Nethope's as Kenya's Coordinator for Women and the Web Project, is an Associate of the Kenya ICT Action Network (KICTANet) where she manages the activities of the Network, and coordinates various debates that touch on policy and regulation in... Read More →
avatar for Njideka Harry

Njideka Harry

President and CEO, Youth for Technology Foundation
Njideka is the President of Youth for Technology Foundation (YTF), an innovative non-profit organization focused on using the power of technology to transform the lives of youth and women living in developing countries. YTF’s strength lies in its ability to access market demands... Read More →
avatar for Lars Christian Smith

Lars Christian Smith

Managing Director, Camara Education
Lars Smith joined Camara in May 2014 as Managing Director, Africa, mainly working in Ethiopia, Kenya, Tanzania and Zambia. He is past Professor and Director of MBA programs, Skema Business School, France; Director of Academic Affairs of the Laureate Online Education - University of... Read More →


Tuesday May 17, 2016 14:00 - 15:30
Giraffe 253

14:45

Accountability Using IATI: A Local Perspective
Limited Capacity seats available

Transparency in the development aid sector has seen a significant rise in the last years, mainly due to global commitment to the open data IATI XML standard. Last year alone, a staggering amount of USD78B was reported to IATI by approx. 380 donors, NGO's, philanthropist and private entities.

The global development aid community is aware of the potential impact IATI has on accountability, transparency, monitoring and evaluation. While efforts have risen to move IATI from a donor perspective to a local level, true local access to this pool of open data is virtually non-existent.

Donors themselves have been investing heavily in ICT tools that enable IATI data to be transformed, exported and re-used, but no significant use cases have arisen that provide local communities with easy to use tools to review, monitor and evaluate development aid activities in their context. This must change.

IATI Studio will make it easy to publish, visualize and use data. A simple web-based interface allows users granular selection, filtering and analysis of development projects related to their community. It aims to provide a simple Responder Tool, enabling local communities to comment and respond if traced projects have not started or promised results are not being met. The local communities will be able to tell their story, re-use the data and hold duty bearers accountable in the IATI chain.

IATI Studio is an imitative by Zimmerman & Zimmerman, Oxfam Novib and Leiden University.

Speakers
avatar for Siem Vaessen (Zimmerman & Zimmerman)

Siem Vaessen (Zimmerman & Zimmerman)

Managing Director, Zimmerman & Zimmerman
Mr. Vaessen is CEO at Zimmerman & Zimmerman, an open-source data and visualization company based in Amsterdam, The Netherlands. He serves as technical liaison to the efforts made by Zimmerman & Zimmerman to maintain a sustainable data-engine, enabling organisations like DfiD, UNESCO... Read More →


Tuesday May 17, 2016 14:45 - 15:30
Giraffe 257

14:45

Complications during Pregnancy in Uganda: Researching Socio-Cultural Drivers Using ICTs
Limited Capacity seats available

Every day, nearly 830 women die from preventable causes related to pregnancy and childbirth across the globe, with more than half of these deaths occurring in Sub-Saharan Africa (WHO, 2015). Socio-cultural factors such as traditional beliefs about pregnancy, play an important role alongside biological/genetic factors and provision of healthcare, in maternal mortality rates. Beliefs, attitudes and norms influence local practices, and whether problematic symptoms are detected and appropriate timely healthcare is sought.
This presentation discusses the method and main findings of a pilot undertaken in 2015 by researchers from the Africa's Voices Foundation, University of Cambridge and Makarere University in Uganda, aimed at understanding the collective beliefs of women in the Central region of Uganda related to complications during and just after pregnancy.
Collaborating with local and national radio stations, we set up a series of interactive radio discussions featuring testimonials of women who had experienced pre-eclampsia. The discussions sparked the interest of diverse audiences who were invited to send their opinions via SMS to a toll-free number. The merits and limitations of combining mobile phones and old media (radio) to reach less accessible populations in the context of health research in Africa will also be discussed. Understanding the norms and beliefs held by different groups and communities is crucial to shape context-specific health interventions focused on improving the quality of medical and social support for Ugandan women during pregnancy.

Speakers
avatar for Dr. Claudia Lopes

Dr. Claudia Lopes

Head of Research and Innovation, Africa's Voices Foundation
Claudia is Head of Research at Africa's Voices Foundation, a spin-out from the University of Cambridge, UK. Claudia has several years of experience working in Africa on research projects related to new technologies and radio audiences interactivity. She is trained as social psychologist... Read More →



Tuesday May 17, 2016 14:45 - 15:30
Giraffe 255

14:45

e-Parliament, Legislative Tracking System and Increase Transparency with ICT
Limited Capacity seats available

System Objective - e-Parliament
Nowadays there is an increased tendency of using the Information and communication technologies (ICT) as essential tools in supporting the work of legislative bodies throughout the world. ICT has become sophisticated and flexible enough to assist the parliaments in their most important responsibilities: making laws and communicating with the citizens. The potential for the IT to significantly enhance the way that the Parliaments conduct their processes and operations is now more evident than ever before.
The Parliaments, as the legislative body in a young democratic country must be able to harness ICT in order to be more representative, transparent, accessible, accountable and effective.
The e-Parliament is considered as a continually evolving concept that is embedded in the institutional approach to modern technologies in the complex parliamentary environment. In order to empower the legislature in the Parliaments through ICT, this project makes not only assessment of the IT infrastructure, but also of the legislative and administrative rules and procedures in the Assembly. The objective is not just to employ new technologies, but also to integrate those technologies in the existing rules and procedures.

Goals and objectives
At the moment there is an increased tendency of using the Information and communication technologies (ICT) as essential tools in supporting the work of legislative bodies throughout the world. ICT has become sophisticated and flexible enough to assist the parliaments in their most important responsibilities making laws and communicating with the citizens.
The challenge for Parliaments are to continually embrace the opportunities that the information technology provides and ensure that citizen's expectations are met, while at the same time ensuring program and cost effectiveness.
There are many reasons why parliaments should consider harnessing ICT in their everyday operations:
- to be more representative,
- to be more transparent,
- to be more accessible,
- to be more accountable
- to be more effective in their many functions.

Speakers
avatar for Vullnet Kabashi

Vullnet Kabashi

Head of IT, Assembly of the Republic of Kosovo
In 1999, Vullnet Kabashi joined Catholic Relief Services's CRS emergency team in Kukes Albania, he continued to work as MIS/IT officer in CRS Kosovo until 2008. He worked as associate professor of Computer Science in University of Prishtina. Currently, Vullnet is Head of IT in the... Read More →



Tuesday May 17, 2016 14:45 - 15:30
Giraffe 256

16:00

African Women and Technology
Limited Capacity seats available

It is widely agreed that ICTs have the potential to improve women's lives globally. However, the discussion often revolves around interventions that increase access to and use of ICTs. This session digs deeper and places emphasis on making human development the starting point of interventions. Through practical examples of their work, ICT4D practitioners on the frontline of African women in technology initiatives will share
i) Context specific, regional and global challenges for women and technology
ii) Failures and successes in realising progressive social change through their initiatives
iii) How ICTs can contribute to transformational and structural changes in gender equality for and by women
iv) Next collaborative steps - linking local, regional and global efforts

Speakers
avatar for Chisenga Muyoya

Chisenga Muyoya

Co-Founder, Asikana Network
Chisenga is a proactive leader with a deep passion for social change and has over 5 years of experience in the ICT sector. Chisenga co-founded Asikana Network, a social enterprise that increases the participation of women and girls in technology. Asikana Network holds free... Read More →


Tuesday May 17, 2016 16:00 - 16:45
Giraffe 253

16:00

Digital Tools for Analog Rights: My Voice Platform
Limited Capacity seats available

Even when citizens have a right to basic services such as healthcare or education, they often receive substandard services or none at all. The spread of digital tools and widespread (and increasing) access to mobile and internet connectivity present exciting new opportunities to improve the delivery of public services by amplifying citizen voice.

In this session, Reboot will discuss an open source tool that we built and piloted, along with an accompanying programmatic intervention, in rural Nigeria. We will share stories of how our user-centered design approach to developing and implementing the tool led to real-life impact, and we will offer a vision for how we hope to collaborate with others in adapting and scaling to improve public service delivery worldwide.

Reboot designed and first implemented My Voice first in rural Nigeria, but this flexible tool is ripe for adaptation and scaling to many different sectors and geographic contexts. We hope that the discussion inspires attendees to think about how they might use their own technology skills, networks, and own experiences to further the use of communications technology to improve analog service delivery experiences. In short, how might we convert the expansion of digital rights and digital access into improvements in the "analog" delivery of basic human services?

Speakers
ZB

Zack Brisson

Principal, Reboot
Zack Brisson is a founder & principal at Reboot, a social enterprise dedicated to inclusive development and accountable governance. A practicing theorist, Zack has extensive experience bringing community-driven approaches to policymaking, program design, and implementation. At Reboot... Read More →


Tuesday May 17, 2016 16:00 - 16:45
Giraffe 257

16:00

The Role of Access to Information in achieving SDG's
Limited Capacity seats available

This Presentation will rotate around the availability of Access to Information (ATI) and Freedom of Information (FoI) laws in different countries in the world, and how these laws can be put to use to meet the Sustainable Development Goals. Case studies will be picked from Uganda, and how the SDG_implementing agencies in Uganda can use the ATI Act of 2005, which among other things promotes civic participation in government programmes, which in many cases has been the missing link in ensuring successful implementation of government progrmmes.
On the other hand, the ATI Act in Uganda obliges government to disclose information to the public, both mandatory and upon request. However, this law has not been put to use basically because of ignorance on the demand side (the general public) and the supply side (government agencies). Promoting awareness of the ATI law and its provisions both in the demand and supply sides will go a long way in contributing to the achievement of the SDG's.

Speakers
ER

Edward Ronald Sekyewa

Executive Director, Hub for Investigative Media (HIM)
Edward Ronald Sekyewa is the Executive Director of Hub for Investigative Media based in Kampala, Uganda.



Tuesday May 17, 2016 16:00 - 16:45
Giraffe 255

16:00

Who's Your Client? Participant Voice ICT for SDGs
Limited Capacity seats available

This session will focus on applying principles of human centered design for the user experience in international development programs. One significant change within international development needed to achieve SDGs is a revitalized focus on the experience of the program participant as a user. Picture Impact believes that each recipient of a development program is the main actor in that exchange and the expert in their own life. International Development programming that is first and foremost designed with the participant's experience in mind can radically change the buy-in, engagement, and ultimately success of a program.

Picture Impact has created a unique suite of services that combines research, formative evaluation, program delivery and support of social/behavioral change through a hybrid of low and high-tech tools. The session will discuss Picture Impact processes and tools as applied in practice to provide a concrete example of how designing for user (program participant) experience can have an impact on the industry moving towards achieving SDGs. The session will be designed with the attendee as the focus, engaging them in discussion and activities exploring user experiences. Attendees are sure to walk away with new insight and practical tools to start integrating a user-focused perspective into their work.

Speakers
avatar for Sara Thompson

Sara Thompson

Co-Founder, Picture Impact
Sara Thompson, MPP is a strategic planner and systems thinker. She has a background in program development, proposal writing, and monitoring and evaluation of federal and multilateral programs. She is a co-founder of Picture Impact, a consultancy based on a core methodology that integrates... Read More →



Tuesday May 17, 2016 16:00 - 16:45
Giraffe 256

16:45

African Women and Technology
Limited Capacity seats available

It is widely agreed that ICTs have the potential to improve women's lives globally. However, the discussion often revolves around interventions that increase access to and use of ICTs. This session digs deeper and places emphasis on making human development the starting point of interventions. Through practical examples of their work, ICT4D practitioners on the frontline of African women in technology initiatives will share
i) Context specific, regional and global challenges for women and technology
ii) Failures and successes in realising progressive social change through their initiatives
iii) How ICTs can contribute to transformational and structural changes in gender equality for and by women
iv) Next collaborative steps - linking local, regional and global efforts

Speakers
avatar for Chisenga Muyoya

Chisenga Muyoya

Co-Founder, Asikana Network
Chisenga is a proactive leader with a deep passion for social change and has over 5 years of experience in the ICT sector. Chisenga co-founded Asikana Network, a social enterprise that increases the participation of women and girls in technology. Asikana Network holds free... Read More →


Tuesday May 17, 2016 16:45 - 17:30
Giraffe 253

16:45

Digital Tools for Analog Rights: My Voice Platform
Limited Capacity seats available

Even when citizens have a right to basic services such as healthcare or education, they often receive substandard services or none at all. The spread of digital tools and widespread (and increasing) access to mobile and internet connectivity present exciting new opportunities to improve the delivery of public services by amplifying citizen voice.

In this session, Reboot will discuss an open source tool that we built and piloted, along with an accompanying programmatic intervention, in rural Nigeria. We will share stories of how our user-centered design approach to developing and implementing the tool led to real-life impact, and we will offer a vision for how we hope to collaborate with others in adapting and scaling to improve public service delivery worldwide.

Reboot designed and first implemented My Voice first in rural Nigeria, but this flexible tool is ripe for adaptation and scaling to many different sectors and geographic contexts. We hope that the discussion inspires attendees to think about how they might use their own technology skills, networks, and own experiences to further the use of communications technology to improve analog service delivery experiences. In short, how might we convert the expansion of digital rights and digital access into improvements in the "analog" delivery of basic human services?

Speakers
ZB

Zack Brisson

Principal, Reboot
Zack Brisson is a founder & principal at Reboot, a social enterprise dedicated to inclusive development and accountable governance. A practicing theorist, Zack has extensive experience bringing community-driven approaches to policymaking, program design, and implementation. At Reboot... Read More →


Tuesday May 17, 2016 16:45 - 17:30
Giraffe 257

16:45

The Role of Access to Information in achieving SDG's
Limited Capacity seats available

This Presentation will rotate around the availability of Access to Information (ATI) and Freedom of Information (FoI) laws in different countries in the world, and how these laws can be put to use to meet the Sustainable Development Goals. Case studies will be picked from Uganda, and how the SDG_implementing agencies in Uganda can use the ATI Act of 2005, which among other things promotes civic participation in government programmes, which in many cases has been the missing link in ensuring successful implementation of government progrmmes.
On the other hand, the ATI Act in Uganda obliges government to disclose information to the public, both mandatory and upon request. However, this law has not been put to use basically because of ignorance on the demand side (the general public) and the supply side (government agencies). Promoting awareness of the ATI law and its provisions both in the demand and supply sides will go a long way in contributing to the achievement of the SDG's.

Speakers
ER

Edward Ronald Sekyewa

Executive Director, Hub for Investigative Media (HIM)
Edward Ronald Sekyewa is the Executive Director of Hub for Investigative Media based in Kampala, Uganda.



Tuesday May 17, 2016 16:45 - 17:30
Giraffe 255

16:45

Who's Your Client? Participant Voice ICT for SDGs
Limited Capacity seats available

This session will focus on applying principles of human centered design for the user experience in international development programs. One significant change within international development needed to achieve SDGs is a revitalized focus on the experience of the program participant as a user. Picture Impact believes that each recipient of a development program is the main actor in that exchange and the expert in their own life. International Development programming that is first and foremost designed with the participant's experience in mind can radically change the buy-in, engagement, and ultimately success of a program.

Picture Impact has created a unique suite of services that combines research, formative evaluation, program delivery and support of social/behavioral change through a hybrid of low and high-tech tools. The session will discuss Picture Impact processes and tools as applied in practice to provide a concrete example of how designing for user (program participant) experience can have an impact on the industry moving towards achieving SDGs. The session will be designed with the attendee as the focus, engaging them in discussion and activities exploring user experiences. Attendees are sure to walk away with new insight and practical tools to start integrating a user-focused perspective into their work.

Speakers
avatar for Sara Thompson

Sara Thompson

Co-Founder, Picture Impact
Sara Thompson, MPP is a strategic planner and systems thinker. She has a background in program development, proposal writing, and monitoring and evaluation of federal and multilateral programs. She is a co-founder of Picture Impact, a consultancy based on a core methodology that integrates... Read More →



Tuesday May 17, 2016 16:45 - 17:30
Giraffe 256
 
Wednesday, May 18
 

10:45

Co-Creation Lab 1/Session 1: Co-Creating a Strategy to Strengthen Access to Information through ICT-Supported Public Participation with the International Commission of Jurists of Kenya (2 Hours)
Limited Capacity seats available

1. Too often ICT conferences involve marketplaces of tools providers - and yet we know to avoid the mistake of being driven by technology itself. ICT conferences often involve case studies of projects putting the tech solution at the forefront, rather than contextual civic dynamics leading to potential tech-entailing solutions.

At the Co-Creation Lab within the Governance and Human Rights track we wish to reverse this trend by providing a space to start with a current socio-political challenge.

The International Commission of Jurists Kenya, a Making All Voices Count grantee on their Access to Justice program is partnering with Oxfam on a Freedom of Information project where we are exploring how we can use ICTs to increase public participation in those Kenyan counties that have passed an Access to Information bill.
ICJ will share the work they have been doing since 2000 in their strive to advocate for a national access to information legislation and increasing public participation in Kenya.
ICJ Kenya has been championing the cause of action to information and the right to know in Kenya for the past decade. Under the Constitution of Kenya, 2010, Access to Information is enshrined as a right for each Kenyan citizen - ICJ Kenya is working to realize this right by advocating for Freedom of Information legislation, to ensure a transparent and responsible government.
The passing of Access to Information bills in some counties opened up new opportunities for direct civic engagement and national level advocacy, and ICTs could play a crucial role in breaking open this space. This is what we will work on during the co-creation session.

Together with strategy experts, transparency and accountability professionals, as well as toolmakers and storytellers we will craft strategies involving ICT components. Whether you've experienced similar challenge or you're a strategist, toolmaker or digital activist - we need you to join us!

In this first session we will be introducing and exploring the issue at stake and the actors involved

We hope the Co-Creation Lab will be like a beehive. You can drop in for a while or stay with us for the day as we'll move into exploring the context and tactics before identifying suitable communication channels and tools, which would be appropriate in serving each context.

ICJ will be present with
Samwel Mohochi - Executive Director
Anita Nyanjong - Programme Manager, Access to Justice
Miriam Bomett - Programme Officer, Democratisation

Moderators
avatar for Linda Raftree

Linda Raftree

Organizer, MERL Tech
Linda Raftree supports strategy, program design, research, and technology in international development initiatives. She co-founded MERLTech in 2014 and also works as an independent consultant. Linda advises Girl Effect on digital safety, security and privacy and supports the organization... Read More →

Speakers
AN

Anne Nderi

ICJ Kenya
International Commission of Jurists-Kenya
avatar for Anita Nyanjong

Anita Nyanjong

Co - Founder, Let Girls Learn Kenya Initiative
I am a lawyer, gender rights expert, and women's rights enthusiast. I recently founded an organisation, Let Girls Learn Kenya Initiative, that seeks to empower girls from marginalized communities in Kenya. We mentor, educate, and provide life skills to women and girls.
avatar for Varyanne Sika

Varyanne Sika

Country Engagement Developer, Making All Voices Count
Varyanne is the Country Engagement Developer in Kenya for the Making All Voices Count (MAVC) program. She works with the MAVC partners in Kenya who include Transparency International-Kenya, The International Commission of Jurists, International Rescue Committee, CAFOD, among others... Read More →


Wednesday May 18, 2016 10:45 - 12:50
Mt Kenya A

10:45

Co-Creation Lab 2/Session 1: Co-Creating an ICT-Supported Strategy to Increase Women's Participation in Governance Process with SITE Enterprises of Kenya (2 Hours)
Limited Capacity seats available

Too often ICT conferences involve marketplaces of tools providers - and yet we know to avoid the mistake of being driven by technology itself. ICT conferences often involve case studies of projects putting the tech solution at the forefront, rather than contextual civic dynamics leading to potential tech-entailing solutions.

At the Co-Creation Lab within the Governance and Human Rights track we wish to reverse this trend by providing a space to start with a current socio-political challenge.

SITE enterprises Kenya are partnering with Oxfam on an EU urban project where we are exploring how we can use ICT to increase women's participation in governance process in Nairobi, with a focus on the informal settlements. SITE are interested in sharing their work in Garissa and Kisii where they are using radio to share information and build capacity of camel traders. There is scope to extend the applications of ICT which we can work in the co-creation session to establish.

Together with strategy experts, transparency and accountability professionals, as well as toolmakers and storytellers we will craft strategies involving ICT components. Whether you've experienced similar challenge or you're a strategist, toolmaker or digital activist - we need you to join us!

In this first (2 hour) session we will be introducing and exploring the issue at stake and the actors involved

We hope the Co-Creation Lab will be like a beehive. You can drop in for a while or stay with us for the day as we'll move into exploring the context and tactics before identifying suitable communication channels and tools which would be appropriate in serving each context.

Moderators
avatar for Merel van der Woude

Merel van der Woude

Creative Director, Butterfly Works
As Creative Director at Butterfly Works, Merel van der Woude leads co-creation processes all over the world, to design interactive communication solutions for social impact. Using a human centered design approach to create meaningful and innovative mobile service systems, interactive... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Joyce Kabue

Joyce Kabue

Communication and Information Advisor, Oxfam
Joyce is the Communication and information Advisor for Oxfam Kenya, with over 8 years experience in the communication field. She also supports the Kenya programme in the use of different ICTs in programming to achieve change at scale.
avatar for Fredrick Mbugua

Fredrick Mbugua

MEL Officer, SITE Enterprise Promotion
Monitoring, Evaluation and Learning Office - SITE Enterprise Promotion. experienced in Projects Monitoring and Evaluation, Research, data management, data analysis & report writing and ICT & Database administration. Holds MSc. in Biometry and BSc. Mathematics and Statistics
JN

Jane Ndungu

Project Manager, SITE EP
I am a project manager working with communities to improve their livelihoods through a markets based approach.. | We use a skills based approach both business and vocational as well as facilitating linkages to business and financial services providers.


Wednesday May 18, 2016 10:45 - 12:50
Mt Kenya B

13:50

Co-Creation Lab 2/Session 2: Co-Creating an ICT-Supported Strategy to Increase Women's Participation in Governance Process with SITE Enterprises of Kenya (2 Hours)
Limited Capacity seats available

After a morning session introducing the issue at stake and the actors involved with our co-creation challenge from SITE enterprises Kenya, this session will explore the context and relevant tactics to tackle the challenge.

Don't be put off if you didn't join us before, we hope the Co-Creation Lab will be like a beehive. You can drop in for a while or stay with us for the day.

To recap: at the Co-Creation Lab within the Accountability, Governance and Human Rights track, we are providing a space to start with a current socio-political challenge. This one is coming from SITE enterprises Kenya who are partnering with Oxfam on an EU urban project where we are exploring how we can use ICT to increase women's participation in governance process in Nairobi, with a focus on the informal settlements. SITE are interested in sharing their work in Garissa and Kisii where they are using radio to share information and build capacity of camel traders. There is scope to extend the applications of ICT which we can work in the co-creation session to establish.

Together with strategy experts, transparency and accountability professionals, as well as toolmakers and storytellers we will craft strategies involving ICT components. Whether you've experienced similar challenge or you're a strategist, toolmaker or digital activist - we need you to join us!

Moderators
avatar for Merel van der Woude

Merel van der Woude

Creative Director, Butterfly Works
As Creative Director at Butterfly Works, Merel van der Woude leads co-creation processes all over the world, to design interactive communication solutions for social impact. Using a human centered design approach to create meaningful and innovative mobile service systems, interactive... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Joyce Kabue

Joyce Kabue

Communication and Information Advisor, Oxfam
Joyce is the Communication and information Advisor for Oxfam Kenya, with over 8 years experience in the communication field. She also supports the Kenya programme in the use of different ICTs in programming to achieve change at scale.
avatar for Fredrick Mbugua

Fredrick Mbugua

MEL Officer, SITE Enterprise Promotion
Monitoring, Evaluation and Learning Office - SITE Enterprise Promotion. experienced in Projects Monitoring and Evaluation, Research, data management, data analysis & report writing and ICT & Database administration. Holds MSc. in Biometry and BSc. Mathematics and Statistics
JN

Jane Ndungu

Project Manager, SITE EP
I am a project manager working with communities to improve their livelihoods through a markets based approach.. | We use a skills based approach both business and vocational as well as facilitating linkages to business and financial services providers.


Wednesday May 18, 2016 13:50 - 16:00
Mt Kenya B

13:50

Co-Creation Lab 1/Session 2: Co-Creating a Strategy to Strengthen Access to Information through ICT-Supported Public Participation with the International Commission of Jurists of Kenya (2 Hours)
Limited Capacity seats available

2. After a morning introducing the issue at stake and the actors involved with our co-creation challenge from the International Commission of Jurists Kenya, this session will explore the context and relevant tactics to tackle the challenge.

Don't be put off if you didn't join us before, we hope the Co-Creation Lab will be like a beehive. You can drop in for a while or stay with us for the day. Everything is possible!

To recap: at the Co-Creation Lab within the Governance and Human Rights track, we are providing a space to start with a current socio-political challenge. This one is coming from International Commission of Jurists Kenya who is partnering with Oxfam on a Freedom of Information project where we are exploring how we can use ICTs to increase public participation in those Kenyan counties that have passed an Access to Information bill.
ICJ will share the work they have been doing since 2000 in their strive to advocate for a national access to information legislation and increasing public participation in Kenya.
The passing of the bill in some counties opened up new opportunities for direct civic engagement and national level advocacy, and ICTs could play a crucial role in breaking open this space. This is what we will work on during the co-creation session.

Together with strategy experts, transparency and accountability professionals, as well as toolmakers and storytellers we will craft strategies involving ICT components. Whether you've experienced similar challenge or you're a strategist, toolmaker or digital activist - we need you to join us!
"

Moderators
avatar for Linda Raftree

Linda Raftree

Organizer, MERL Tech
Linda Raftree supports strategy, program design, research, and technology in international development initiatives. She co-founded MERLTech in 2014 and also works as an independent consultant. Linda advises Girl Effect on digital safety, security and privacy and supports the organization... Read More →

Speakers
AN

Anne Nderi

ICJ Kenya
International Commission of Jurists-Kenya
avatar for Anita Nyanjong

Anita Nyanjong

Co - Founder, Let Girls Learn Kenya Initiative
I am a lawyer, gender rights expert, and women's rights enthusiast. I recently founded an organisation, Let Girls Learn Kenya Initiative, that seeks to empower girls from marginalized communities in Kenya. We mentor, educate, and provide life skills to women and girls.
avatar for Varyanne Sika

Varyanne Sika

Country Engagement Developer, Making All Voices Count
Varyanne is the Country Engagement Developer in Kenya for the Making All Voices Count (MAVC) program. She works with the MAVC partners in Kenya who include Transparency International-Kenya, The International Commission of Jurists, International Rescue Committee, CAFOD, among others... Read More →


Wednesday May 18, 2016 13:50 - 16:00
Mt Kenya A

16:30

Co-Creation Lab 1/Session 3: Co-Creating a Strategy to Strengthen Access to Information through ICT-Supported Public Participation with the International Commission of Jurists of Kenya
Limited Capacity seats available

3. By now we'll have had some sessions introducing ICJ and the actors involved with their co-creation challenge and we have got to grips with the context and relevant tactics to tackle the challenge. Now it's the nitty gritty of Identifying suitable communication channels and tools which would be appropriate in serving this problem in this context.

Don't be put off if you didn't join us before, we hope the Co-Creation Lab will be like a beehive. You can drop in for a while or stay with us for the day. Everything is possible!

To recap: at the Co-Creation Lab within the Governance and Human Rights track, we are providing a space to start with a current socio-political challenge. This one is coming from International Commission of Jurists Kenya who is partnering with Oxfam on a Freedom of Information project where we are exploring how we can use ICTs to increase public participation in those Kenyan counties that have passed an Access to Information bill.
ICJ will share the work they have been doing since 2000 in their strive to advocate for a national access to information legislation and increasing public participation in Kenya.
The passing of the bill in some counties opened up new opportunities for direct civic engagement and national level advocacy, and ICTs could play a crucial role in breaking open this space. This is what we will work on during the co-creation session.

Together with strategy experts, transparency and accountability professionals, as well as toolmakers and storytellers we will craft strategies involving ICT components. Whether you've experienced similar challenge or you're a strategist, toolmaker or digital activist - we need you to join us!

Moderators
avatar for Linda Raftree

Linda Raftree

Organizer, MERL Tech
Linda Raftree supports strategy, program design, research, and technology in international development initiatives. She co-founded MERLTech in 2014 and also works as an independent consultant. Linda advises Girl Effect on digital safety, security and privacy and supports the organization... Read More →

Speakers
AN

Anne Nderi

ICJ Kenya
International Commission of Jurists-Kenya
avatar for Anita Nyanjong

Anita Nyanjong

Co - Founder, Let Girls Learn Kenya Initiative
I am a lawyer, gender rights expert, and women's rights enthusiast. I recently founded an organisation, Let Girls Learn Kenya Initiative, that seeks to empower girls from marginalized communities in Kenya. We mentor, educate, and provide life skills to women and girls.
avatar for Varyanne Sika

Varyanne Sika

Country Engagement Developer, Making All Voices Count
Varyanne is the Country Engagement Developer in Kenya for the Making All Voices Count (MAVC) program. She works with the MAVC partners in Kenya who include Transparency International-Kenya, The International Commission of Jurists, International Rescue Committee, CAFOD, among others... Read More →


Wednesday May 18, 2016 16:30 - 17:30
Mt Kenya A

16:30

Co-Creation Lab 2/Session 3: Co-Creating an ICT-Supported Strategy to Increase Women's Participation in Governance Process with SITE Enterprises of Kenya
Limited Capacity seats available

By now we'll have had some sessions introducing SITE enterprises and the actors involved with their co-creation challenge and we're have got to grips with the context and relevant tactics to tackle the challenge. Now it's the nitty gritty of identifying suitable communication channels and tools which would be appropriate in serving this problem in this context.

Don't be put off if you didn't join us before, we hope the Co-Creation Lab will be like a beehive. You can drop in for a while or stay with us for the day.

To recap: at the Co-Creation Lab within the Accountability, Governance and Human Rights track, we are providing a space to start with a current socio-political challenge. This one is coming from SITE enterprises Kenya who are partnering with Oxfam on an EU urban project where we are exploring how we can use ICT to increase women's participation in governance process in Nairobi, with a focus on the informal settlements. SITE are interested in sharing their work in Garissa and Kisii where they are using radio to share information and build capacity of camel traders. There is scope to extend the applications of ICT which we can work in the co-creation session to establish.

Together with strategy experts, transparency and accountability professionals, as well as toolmakers and storytellers we will craft strategies involving ICT components. Whether you've experienced similar challenge or you're a strategist, toolmaker or digital activist - we need you to join us!

Moderators
avatar for Merel van der Woude

Merel van der Woude

Creative Director, Butterfly Works
As Creative Director at Butterfly Works, Merel van der Woude leads co-creation processes all over the world, to design interactive communication solutions for social impact. Using a human centered design approach to create meaningful and innovative mobile service systems, interactive... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Joyce Kabue

Joyce Kabue

Communication and Information Advisor, Oxfam
Joyce is the Communication and information Advisor for Oxfam Kenya, with over 8 years experience in the communication field. She also supports the Kenya programme in the use of different ICTs in programming to achieve change at scale.
avatar for Fredrick Mbugua

Fredrick Mbugua

MEL Officer, SITE Enterprise Promotion
Monitoring, Evaluation and Learning Office - SITE Enterprise Promotion. experienced in Projects Monitoring and Evaluation, Research, data management, data analysis & report writing and ICT & Database administration. Holds MSc. in Biometry and BSc. Mathematics and Statistics
JN

Jane Ndungu

Project Manager, SITE EP
I am a project manager working with communities to improve their livelihoods through a markets based approach.. | We use a skills based approach both business and vocational as well as facilitating linkages to business and financial services providers.


Wednesday May 18, 2016 16:30 - 17:30
Mt Kenya B
 
Thursday, May 19
 

10:45

Reporting Back from the Co-Creation Labs
Limited Capacity seats available

Day 3 sees a Cocreation Lab within the Governance and Human Rights where we will provide a space to start with two current socio-political challenges and two local case-owners will share their problem statements with us. Together with strategy experts, transparency and accountability professionals, as well as toolmakers and storytellers we will craft strategies involving ICT components. Join this session to hear a report back on how we got on: both in terms of solutions we came up with together but importantly how we found this process of troubleshooting!

Speakers
avatar for Amy O'Donnell

Amy O'Donnell

ICT in Programme Lead, Oxfam
Amy is an adviser on applications of information communications technologies (ICTs) to support programming at Oxfam GB. Her role involves supporting staff working in humanitarian response, campaigning and long term development to explore effective design and best practice in the use... Read More →


Thursday May 19, 2016 10:45 - 11:30
Giraffe 258

10:45

Understanding Needs: Getting from Inspiration to Specification
Limited Capacity filling up

Many organizations come to a procurement process with a favorite platform in mind, either from prior experience or because they've heard compelling marketing or stories. Starting from the tool first means that you aren't being true to what really matters - your needs and those of your users.

SIMLab uses an agile methodology which prioritizes strong knowledge of the users and context plus a desired outcome, and uses that to get to a working prototype (whether you're building or modifying an existing tool) which can be tested by real users as early as possible. Getting feedback on the features and capabilities of the system while you're still developing the solution allows you to respond to needs as your idea meets reality.

This interactive session will go over best practices for getting your team from the inspiration and idea stage to a technical specification. We'll cover how to develop user personas, use them to map your systems, generate user stories, and then match these with technical specifications. These tools will help you truly understand what you need from a tech platform, allowing you to prioritize and build for your intended users from the very beginning. We'll share examples from our past work leading organizations through this process, such as developing a system for Mine Risk Education with the Danish Demining Group or for supporting the college application process with KIPP Delta Public Schools. Participants will leave the session with practical steps and activities to get themselves from an idea to a request for proposals or technical specification.

Speakers
VO

Valerie Oliphant

Projects Manager, Social Impact Lab (SIMLab)
Valerie is a Project Director at SIMLab, where she helps organizations and individuals use inclusive technologies to improve systems and services. She's passionate about advancing social equality with a commitment to reflective practice and continuous learning. Prior to joining SIMLab... Read More →


Thursday May 19, 2016 10:45 - 11:30
Giraffe 259

11:30

ICT for Peaceful and Inclusive Societies - How to Use Technological Innovations for Good Governance and Human Rights?
Limited Capacity seats available

eGovernance approaches in German Development cooperation
Chances and risks of ICT for strengthening good governance are highly debated in government, civil society and business both in our developed and developing countries. eGovernance is one key area when thinking about innovations in supporting good governance, with eGovernment as one tool to improve the administrative performance and eParticipation as a method to transform political participation and increase the constructive dialogue between state and citizens. With the adoption of the SDGs finally the importance of good governance as an enabler of change has been internationally recognized. With the inclusion of goal 16 for peaceful and inclusive societies the focus on good governance and human rights has increased. This chance to boost the engagement in this sector needs to be taken, but it will also be more observed than ever and needs to deliver more visible results. Understanding the risks and chances of ICT and using the latter to foster the engagement of the international community and our partner countries is absolutely necessary.
Germany has presented a systematic whole-of government approach with a Digital Agenda. One main area of the Agenda is supporting an innovative state and increasing digitalization in the administration. The Federal Ministry of Economic Cooperation and Development BMZ is taking this topic serious and will specify in an own agenda what digitalization means for the approaches and activities of the German development cooperation. Governance and human rights aspects are foreseen to take a prominent position in this framework and shall give clear indications on how to integrate the chances and opportunities of digitalization.

Moderators
KH

Katharina Hild

Policy Advisor on Good Governance, GIZ/BMZ Advisory Programme
GIZ/ BMZ Advisory Programme on Good Governance

Speakers
avatar for Ibraheem Sanusi

Ibraheem Sanusi

Deputy Head, African Governance Architecture Secretariat, African Union Commission, GIZ
Through the citizen engagement work which he leads, the AU launched the ‘DGTrends’ – Democratic Governance Trends which aims to broaden African citizen’s engagement with the Africa Union Organs and Institutions with democratic governance mandates. Since 2013 till date, the... Read More →


Thursday May 19, 2016 11:30 - 12:15
Giraffe 259

11:30

Technopoly - ICTs and the Wider Development Divide
Limited Capacity full

In a world that is fast becoming digitalized, having access to technology is not a luxury, instead it is progressively becoming a basic necessity. As well-intentioned organizations push for digital service delivery for improved and efficient governance, accountability and transparency - it is crucial to understand 'digital economies and politics' in various different contexts. It is a fact that despite the progress in making technology more available, accessible and affordable, the inequalities and inequities across and within various intersections of populations, countries and communities are still looming large. As the recent World Development Report 2016 highlighting the inequalities of digital dividends states that the 'traditional development challenges are preventing the digital revolution from fulfilling its transformative potential'. 

As an innovative consortium, MAVC's work model brings together a diverse group of organizations, communities and people in all ideas implementation chain. We have one of the most innovative technology companies (Ushahidi) collaborating closely with an international development organization (Hivos) and an academic research institute (Institute of Development Studies UK), supporting community-based organizations in the Global South to improve local governance structures through community-driven ideas. Through three years of implementation of this model, MAVC is well aware of the digital divide even across the developing countries of the Global South. One of our major learning for ICT4D is that more than making the reach of ICTs universal, we should be improving depth of ICTs and how they engage with traditional development challenges of inequality to be able to facilitate achievement of SDGs. 

For example, a 45 year old woman working in a garment factory in Bangladesh may have access to a mobile phone but for her to effectively engage in local workers' union, which are often dominated and led by male workers, to demand her rights and hold the authorities accountable, a mobile app organizing the union is not enough. The app developers must dive deep into the social and cultural dynamics of her engagement as a middle-aged woman in the specific context of Bangladesh i.e. keeping her language, literacy, education, family and social set-ups as active factors of how the ICTs are developed, distributed and used. Furthermore, this app might be open-source but the same code might not apply to a similar case of female garment workers in Ghana. In this classic development context, how might we maximize value of ICTs in achieving global SDGs? 

Some of the questions we would like to address through this forum include: 

1. Problems around governance are usually long term, entrenched and cultural how can we use technology to kick start engagement between citizens and governments? 

2. When technology in governance/accountability projects are scaled/replicated across regions/countries and contexts, how much is replicable and how much is to be contextualized? How realistic are we about such contextualization that might be a laboring process? 

3. How can we create dynamic civil society groups that are inclusive, intersectional and can bring depth to the application of technology to traditional development challenges?

Speakers (TBC):

This is My Backyard by Platypus Productions, Liberia

Open content in Kalimantan by Perkumpulan Wikimedia, Indonesia 

Digital mapping for social accountability by Kwale Youth Governance Coalition, Kenya

Engaging Citizens in Service Delivery Performance Data by Bahawalpur Service Delivery Unit, Pakistan

Format of Panel + Discussion

Participants will be assigned roles once they enter the discussion room. These roles will include: technologist, policy maker, an illiterate daily-wage citizen, a female teacher from rural area, a young private school-going male teen, an NGO worker specializing in social protection issues etc. Each participant will be asked to reflect on the discussion from the standpoint of the assigned roles and ask questions, contribute thoughts of the panel accordingly. The panel will be documented by MAVC through blogs, tweets and as a learning report.


Moderators
avatar for Declan Ottaro

Declan Ottaro

Innovation Coordinator, Making All Voices Count
Information Technology Professional with international experience seeking to deploy long-term innovative solutions that work for Africa. Innovation Director Making All Voices Count

Speakers
avatar for Siska Doviana

Siska Doviana

Program Manager, Wikimedia Indonesia
Siska is a grantee from Making All Voices Count, a team effort between Wikimedia Indonesia and Humanitarian Open Street Map to map Kalimantan, Indonesia (2013-2016). Siska experience include manages Cipta Media Grant, a one million dollar open call media grant from Ford Foundation... Read More →
avatar for Ali Inam

Ali Inam

Executive Director, Technology for People Initiative LUMS
Ali is the Executive Director of the Technology for the People Initiative (TPI), which is a research and design center institute enabling academia to explore technology interventions in partnership with the public sector in Pakistan. Since 2012, the center has introduced multiple... Read More →
avatar for Anjali Nayar

Anjali Nayar

Founder, TIMBY
Anjali is an award-winning journalist and filmmaker with over 10 years of experience reporting from the Global South. In addition to founding TIMBY, Anjali has worked for Nature, Reuters, the BBC, CBC and Al Jazeera and is the director of the documentary film Gun Runners (2016) and... Read More →
JM

Jawa Mwachupa Wangoni

Executive Director, Kwale Youth and Governance Consortium,
Jawa has over ten years in researching, creating and implementing ICT based solutions in governance and policy influence. This has been creating links and building bridges between citizens in rural areas and the government. He worked on digital cartography for social accountability... Read More →


Slide pdf

Thursday May 19, 2016 11:30 - 12:15
Giraffe 258

12:15

ICT for Peaceful and Inclusive Societies - How to Use Technological Innovations for Good Governance and Human Rights?
Limited Capacity seats available

eGovernance approaches in German Development cooperation
Chances and risks of ICT for strengthening good governance are highly debated in government, civil society and business both in our developed and developing countries. eGovernance is one key area when thinking about innovations in supporting good governance, with eGovernment as one tool to improve the administrative performance and eParticipation as a method to transform political participation and increase the constructive dialogue between state and citizens. With the adoption of the SDGs finally the importance of good governance as an enabler of change has been internationally recognized. With the inclusion of goal 16 for peaceful and inclusive societies the focus on good governance and human rights has increased. This chance to boost the engagement in this sector needs to be taken, but it will also be more observed than ever and needs to deliver more visible results. Understanding the risks and chances of ICT and using the latter to foster the engagement of the international community and our partner countries is absolutely necessary.
Germany has presented a systematic whole-of government approach with a Digital Agenda. One main area of the Agenda is supporting an innovative state and increasing digitalization in the administration. The Federal Ministry of Economic Cooperation and Development BMZ is taking this topic serious and will specify in an own agenda what digitalization means for the approaches and activities of the German development cooperation. Governance and human rights aspects are foreseen to take a prominent position in this framework and shall give clear indications on how to integrate the chances and opportunities of digitalization.

Moderators
KH

Katharina Hild

Policy Advisor on Good Governance, GIZ/BMZ Advisory Programme
GIZ/ BMZ Advisory Programme on Good Governance

Speakers
avatar for Ibraheem Sanusi

Ibraheem Sanusi

Deputy Head, African Governance Architecture Secretariat, African Union Commission, GIZ
Through the citizen engagement work which he leads, the AU launched the ‘DGTrends’ – Democratic Governance Trends which aims to broaden African citizen’s engagement with the Africa Union Organs and Institutions with democratic governance mandates. Since 2013 till date, the... Read More →


Thursday May 19, 2016 12:15 - 13:00
Giraffe 259

12:15

Technopoly - ICTs and the Wider Development Divide
Limited Capacity filling up

In a world that is fast becoming digitalized, having access to technology is not a luxury, instead it is progressively becoming a basic necessity. As well-intentioned organizations push for digital service delivery for improved and efficient governance, accountability and transparency - it is crucial to understand 'digital economies and politics' in various different contexts. It is a fact that despite the progress in making technology more available, accessible and affordable, the inequalities and inequities across and within various intersections of populations, countries and communities are still looming large. As the recent World Development Report 2016 highlighting the inequalities of digital dividends states that the 'traditional development challenges are preventing the digital revolution from fulfilling its transformative potential'. 

As an innovative consortium, MAVC's work model brings together a diverse group of organizations, communities and people in all ideas implementation chain. We have one of the most innovative technology companies (Ushahidi) collaborating closely with an international development organization (Hivos) and an academic research institute (Institute of Development Studies UK), supporting community-based organizations in the Global South to improve local governance structures through community-driven ideas. Through three years of implementation of this model, MAVC is well aware of the digital divide even across the developing countries of the Global South. One of our major learning for ICT4D is that more than making the reach of ICTs universal, we should be improving depth of ICTs and how they engage with traditional development challenges of inequality to be able to facilitate achievement of SDGs. 

For example, a 45 year old woman working in a garment factory in Bangladesh may have access to a mobile phone but for her to effectively engage in local workers' union, which are often dominated and led by male workers, to demand her rights and hold the authorities accountable, a mobile app organizing the union is not enough. The app developers must dive deep into the social and cultural dynamics of her engagement as a middle-aged woman in the specific context of Bangladesh i.e. keeping her language, literacy, education, family and social set-ups as active factors of how the ICTs are developed, distributed and used. Furthermore, this app might be open-source but the same code might not apply to a similar case of female garment workers in Ghana. In this classic development context, how might we maximize value of ICTs in achieving global SDGs? 

Some of the questions we would like to address through this forum include: 

1. Problems around governance are usually long term, entrenched and cultural how can we use technology to kick start engagement between citizens and governments? 

2. When technology in governance/accountability projects are scaled/replicated across regions/countries and contexts, how much is replicable and how much is to be contextualized? How realistic are we about such contextualization that might be a laboring process? 

3. How can we create dynamic civil society groups that are inclusive, intersectional and can bring depth to the application of technology to traditional development challenges?

Speakers (TBC):

This is My Backyard by Platypus Productions, Liberia

Open content in Kalimantan by Perkumpulan Wikimedia, Indonesia 

Digital mapping for social accountability by Kwale Youth Governance Coalition, Kenya

Engaging Citizens in Service Delivery Performance Data by Bahawalpur Service Delivery Unit, Pakistan

Format of Panel + Discussion

Participants will be assigned roles once they enter the discussion room. These roles will include: technologist, policy maker, an illiterate daily-wage citizen, a female teacher from rural area, a young private school-going male teen, an NGO worker specializing in social protection issues etc. Each participant will be asked to reflect on the discussion from the standpoint of the assigned roles and ask questions, contribute thoughts of the panel accordingly. The panel will be documented by MAVC through blogs, tweets and as a learning report.


Moderators
avatar for Declan Ottaro

Declan Ottaro

Innovation Coordinator, Making All Voices Count
Information Technology Professional with international experience seeking to deploy long-term innovative solutions that work for Africa. Innovation Director Making All Voices Count

Speakers
avatar for Siska Doviana

Siska Doviana

Program Manager, Wikimedia Indonesia
Siska is a grantee from Making All Voices Count, a team effort between Wikimedia Indonesia and Humanitarian Open Street Map to map Kalimantan, Indonesia (2013-2016). Siska experience include manages Cipta Media Grant, a one million dollar open call media grant from Ford Foundation... Read More →
avatar for Ali Inam

Ali Inam

Executive Director, Technology for People Initiative LUMS
Ali is the Executive Director of the Technology for the People Initiative (TPI), which is a research and design center institute enabling academia to explore technology interventions in partnership with the public sector in Pakistan. Since 2012, the center has introduced multiple... Read More →
avatar for Anjali Nayar

Anjali Nayar

Founder, TIMBY
Anjali is an award-winning journalist and filmmaker with over 10 years of experience reporting from the Global South. In addition to founding TIMBY, Anjali has worked for Nature, Reuters, the BBC, CBC and Al Jazeera and is the director of the documentary film Gun Runners (2016) and... Read More →
JM

Jawa Mwachupa Wangoni

Executive Director, Kwale Youth and Governance Consortium,
Jawa has over ten years in researching, creating and implementing ICT based solutions in governance and policy influence. This has been creating links and building bridges between citizens in rural areas and the government. He worked on digital cartography for social accountability... Read More →


Thursday May 19, 2016 12:15 - 13:00
Giraffe 258

14:00

Tech4 TA/ Open Governance - Where Are We Standing and Where Are We Going?
Limited Capacity seats available

Tech4 TA/ Open Governance - where are we standing and where do we go?
Open government and open data have become the new pre-occupation of research, civic activism and advocacy in development. Whereas they thus have come to the centre stage in development generally, whether they actually are enabling more effective changes in rules of the game in the relationship between citizens and states is still an area that is still filled with a lot anecdotal experiences rather than forming a consistent evidence. The recent MAVC supported research, as well teased out in the recently published IDS bulletin, shows that the opportunities that are emerging with new technologies should not be over romanticized, given the reality that the same technologies are skillfully used by the powerful to suppress the voices, or otherwise through tokenistic responses that are never about changing rules of the game.

Six Conclusions emerge from the IDS Bulletin regarding T&A and technology :

a) Political will is a necessary but insufficient condition for tech-based approaches to open them up. Where there is a will, tech-for T&A may provide a way but where there is no will, it will not.
b) Opening governance relationships and processes is a much more complex and demanding task than opening government-related products, artifacts and services
c) Data once opened might remain in the public domain but the corresponding governance openings tend to close again as dynamics change. Technology has the potential to contribute to maintaining governance openness but only when taken together with sustaining an enabling environment in terms of the associated social-cultural, political and organizational factors among citizens and within government
d) There is need to close the gap between researchers and practitioners in using the emerging evidence of how to design effective Transparency and Accountability projects. Committing to learning and opening to new knowledge is the way to go
e) Practitioners need to stop and rethink the 'tech-hype' before following, committing to the search for robust evidence on which to ground their work.
f) Funding agencies need to adopt funding models that enable explore politically savvy long-term changes rather than the short-term interventions that might be tactically savvy but strategically of less long-term impact.

Meanwhile, recent readings for a governance practitioner also point to the need to commit learning in action because whereas everyone agrees that context is important, very few people acknowledge that their own premeditated frameworks are often the main hindrance to learning; that local actors in a lived reality have a lot to contribute to finding solutions to their challenges; that the contextual dynamics in play need tech-savvy and development practitioners that can think on their feet to address them effectively. They have to think and work politically, which then challenges their traditional idea of 'policy' change and practice as the central focus of their advocacy efforts.

In the end, therefore, all these perspectives seem to point to the fact that if technology has to be meaningful for development policy and practice, understanding the politics of incentives within government and among citizens are key. This means that, as participants at a recently organised MAVC learning event indicated, 'the typical technologist has to commit to as much learning as the typical development practitioner' (my own re-phrase). The Sustainable Development Goals offer a lot of opportunities for the framing the technology for development thinking, but the real contribution will happen at the nexus between ideas and practice.

Speakers
avatar for Dr. Fletcher Tembo

Dr. Fletcher Tembo

Programme Director: Making All Voices Count: the Grand Challenge for Development, Making All Voices Count
Dr. Fletcher Tembo is Director for the Making All Voices Count Programme, an international initiative that contributes towards effective governance and accountability by enabling citizen engagement and open, responsive government in 12 countries in Africa and Asia. The programme is... Read More →



Thursday May 19, 2016 14:00 - 14:45
Jambo Conference Centre

14:45

Looking Ahead: Technology for Accountability, Governance and Human Rights
Limited Capacity seats available

This final synthesis session will attempt an integration of the key themes emerging from the week's sessions in the Governance, Rights and Accountability Track, and propose a provocation for participants: the open movement is surging globally. But are aspirations and rhetoric of open government and open data distracting from hard questions about real accountability, inequality, and citizen power? This panel discussion will examine the critical questions that ICT4D poses at the outset of the SDG era, and challenge participants to move from vision to action in the application of technology in the pursuit of more fair and just societies.t

Speakers
avatar for Paul O'Brien

Paul O'Brien

Vice President for Policy and Campaigns, Oxfam America
Paul O’Brien is the Vice President for Policy and Campaigns at Oxfam America where he oversees research, policy, advocacy, and campaigning work to influence the US government and US corporations. Before joining Oxfam in 2007, he lived in Afghanistan for five years where he worked... Read More →


Thursday May 19, 2016 14:45 - 15:30
Jambo Conference Centre