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The annual ICT4D Conferences have proven to be an invaluable opportunity for NGOs, private sector organizations, universities, governmental agencies and foundations to share their experience in using ICT to increase the impact of development programs and to learn from each other.  In 2016, 715 individuals from 76 countries and 301 private sector and public sector and civil society explored the ways to harness the full power of digital solutions to achieve the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals.  Our thanks to Accenture, Catholic Relief Services, Esri, Hewlett Packard Enterprise, iMerit Technology Services, Inmarsat, IS Solutions, Making All Voices Count, Mercy Corps, Microsoft, NetHope, Oxfam, Pandexio, Qualcom Wireless Reach, RTI International, SimbaNet and World Vision for making that possible.

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07- Livelihoods and Financial Inclusion [clear filter]
Monday, May 16
 

10:45

Blockchain for Good: Disrupting Extreme Poverty Using Economic Identity
Limited Capacity filling up

Economic Identity is a birth right of every human being. The blockchain innovation enables a universal ID for refugees, IDPs and people living in extreme poverty.

Current interventions like micro-credit, social ventures, food aid, financial inclusion continues to stumble. Places like Bangladesh, DRC, Sudan, Somalia, Guatemala and CAR etc. where aid pours in millions of dollars continue to suffer.

Why? Because 2.5 billion people in the world don't have Economic Identity! We can solve this in the next 10 years or less with blockchain based identity.

http://finovate.com/finovatespring-2016-best-show-winners-announced/

 


Speakers
avatar for Ashish Gadnis

Ashish Gadnis

BanQu (Investor) / UN Women (International Consultant), BanQu / UN Women
http://finovate.com/finovatespring-2016-best-show-winners-announced/ | | Major Accolades - August 2014: Change Maker Award Winner (ARC) - Coding Schools for Refugees - September 2013: Selected by Clinton Global Initiative -- DRC Action Committee - January 2010: Delivered 48 tons... Read More →



Monday May 16, 2016 10:45 - 11:30
Giraffe 260

10:45

Can mCommerce Lead to Economic Sustainability?
Limited Capacity seats available

How do you make it possible for millions of people to become self-sustainable business owners? The new tech startup Sky.Garden intends to do just that.

Sky.Garden introduces an app for internet enabled phones for individuals and small businesses in the spring of 2016, starting in Kenya. It provides a new way for people with neither the initial capital or knowledge of m-commerce to easily and safely trade or barter goods and services.

The Sky.Garden project address three major pain points:
- Trust between buyers and sellers by applying a trust and verification algorithm.
- Safe payments through and across adopted payment platforms guaranteed by Sky.Garden.
- Sky.Garden expands the range of business by tapping into established infrastructure and by offering alternative ways for buyers and sellers to connect.

This presentation will showcase how new and existing technology is used to tie together disconnected services, and how important it is to zoom in on local culture, when rolling out a multinational project.

Speakers
CG

Christian Grubak

CTO, Sky.Garden
As the Chief Technology Officer and Co-Founder of Sky.Garden, Christian Grubak leads the vision and strategic technology. Before founding Sky.Garden, Christian was the CTO of E-Supplies for more than 10 years; one of the leading e-commerce agencies in Denmark working with more than... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 10:45 - 11:30
Giraffe 261

10:45

mFinance: Is It a Case of Collaboration or Disruption?
Limited Capacity seats available

As Mobile Network Operators launch Mobile Money, banks launch Mobile Banking services, regulators on the other hand are playing catch-up, with inclusive/cashless/branchless banking policies. Banking executives and ICT experts, have expressed growing concerns of the pervasiveness of Mobile Network Operators on their traditional terrain. The potential of wiping out traditional banking (brick and mortar) services has never been apparent until now. This presentation examines the case of Ghana's financial inclusive ecosystem to ascertain whether the pro-inclusive policies and guidelines have the potential of strengthening the nascent mobile money sector, while weakening the competitive advantage of the more entrenched traditional banking sector.

Out of the six MNOs , there are four active mobile money service providers with an average mobile subscriber base of approximately 5 million. Mobile telephony as an ICT sub-sector is noted to be one of the most dynamic, yet disruptive and transformative sub-sector of ICT anchored on innovation and development. In essence, this presentation attempts to map out the disruptive potential of inclusive digital financial policy as it excludes traditional banking services in Ghana.


Speakers
avatar for Kweku Koranteng

Kweku Koranteng

PhD Candidate, School of Public Leadership, Stellenbosch University
Kweku Koranteng a PhD Candidate at the School of Public Leadership, Stellenbosch University and a visiting research fellow at the Department of Information Systems at the University of Ghana Business School. He the founder of a Transdisciplinary Research Network and the co-founder... Read More →



Monday May 16, 2016 10:45 - 11:30
Giraffe 252

11:30

Blockchain for Good: Disrupting Extreme Poverty Using Economic Identity
Limited Capacity filling up

Economic Identity is a birth right of every human being. The blockchain techology enables a true economic opportuity for the refugees, IDPs, and people lving in extreme poverty worldwide.

Current interventions like micro-credit, social ventures, food aid, financial inclusion continues to stumble. Places like Bangladesh, DRC, Sudan, Somalia, Guatemala and CAR etc. where aid pours in millions of dollars continue to suffer.

Why? Because 2.5 billion people in the world don't have Economic Identity! We can solve this in the next 10 years or less with blockchain based identity.

http://finovate.com/finovatespring-2016-best-show-winners-announced/

 


Speakers
avatar for Ashish Gadnis

Ashish Gadnis

BanQu (Investor) / UN Women (International Consultant), BanQu / UN Women
http://finovate.com/finovatespring-2016-best-show-winners-announced/ | | Major Accolades - August 2014: Change Maker Award Winner (ARC) - Coding Schools for Refugees - September 2013: Selected by Clinton Global Initiative -- DRC Action Committee - January 2010: Delivered 48 tons... Read More →



Monday May 16, 2016 11:30 - 12:15
Giraffe 260

11:30

Can mCommerce Lead to Economic Sustainability?
Limited Capacity seats available

How do you make it possible for millions of people to become self-sustainable business owners? The new tech startup Sky.Garden intends to do just that.

Sky.Garden introduces an app for internet enabled phones for individuals and small businesses in the spring of 2016, starting in Kenya. It provides a new way for people with neither the initial capital or knowledge of m-commerce to easily and safely trade or barter goods and services.

The Sky.Garden project address three major pain points:
- Trust between buyers and sellers by applying a trust and verification algorithm.
- Safe payments through and across adopted payment platforms guaranteed by Sky.Garden.
- Sky.Garden expands the range of business by tapping into established infrastructure and by offering alternative ways for buyers and sellers to connect.

This presentation will showcase how new and existing technology is used to tie together disconnected services, and how important it is to zoom in on local culture, when rolling out a multinational project.

Speakers
CG

Christian Grubak

CTO, Sky.Garden
As the Chief Technology Officer and Co-Founder of Sky.Garden, Christian Grubak leads the vision and strategic technology. Before founding Sky.Garden, Christian was the CTO of E-Supplies for more than 10 years; one of the leading e-commerce agencies in Denmark working with more than... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 11:30 - 12:15
Giraffe 261

11:30

mFinance: Is It a Case of Collaboration or Disruption?
Limited Capacity seats available

As mobile operators launch mobile payment services, banks are launching mobile banking services. The adoption of Mobile telephony in Africa has been feted as one of the most progressive in the world, this has open avenues for new and innovates services to be developed on such a success. Mobile payment has been a flagship services developed on this nascent technology. The essence of this session is (1) to assess degree of adoption by different countries in Africa (2) the regulatory argument and (3) the blur boundaries within the mFinance business landscape.

The literature underpinning the ensuing discussion was drawn from the finding analysis of 41 research studies on mFinance in developing countries conducted by Chib et al. (2015), illuminating not only in what it reveals but in the shadows that permeate the field.

From this review we consider two issues as significant. First, trust is highlighted as a mechanism factor that leads to adoption. As the poor relies more on physical money and face-to-face relationships and mediations to exchange money, issues of trust may be important for future research, to understand more of its functions and how to manage it. It is important to note how the literature reports that trust can be transferred, being this a remarkable feature to be applied by mFinance practitioners. Second, are issues of affordability. Even though it is considered a main barrier for adoption, the literature shows that cost is relevant only for some groups. The poor must be thought of as a heterogeneous group.


Speakers
avatar for Kweku Koranteng

Kweku Koranteng

PhD Candidate, School of Public Leadership, Stellenbosch University
Kweku Koranteng a PhD Candidate at the School of Public Leadership, Stellenbosch University and a visiting research fellow at the Department of Information Systems at the University of Ghana Business School. He the founder of a Transdisciplinary Research Network and the co-founder... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 11:30 - 12:15
Giraffe 252

12:15

Constructing Spatiotemporal Poverty Indices from Big Data
Limited Capacity seats available

Big data offers the potential of calculating timely estimates of the socioeconomic development of a region. Mobile telephone activity provides an enormous wealth of information that can be utilized along with traditional household surveys. Estimates of poverty and wealth rely on the calculation of features from call detail records (CDRs). However, mobile network operators are reluctant to provide access to CDRs due to commercial sensitivity and privacy concerns. As a compromise, we show that a relatively sparse CDR dataset combined with other publicly available datasets based on satellite imagery can yield competitive results. In particular, we build a model using two features from the CDRs, mobile ownership per capita and call volume per phone, combined with normalized satellite nightlight data and population density, to estimate the multi-dimensional poverty index (MPI) at the sector level in Rwanda. Our model accurately predicts the MPI for sectors in Rwanda that contain mobile phone cell towers (cross-validated correlation of 0.88).


Speakers
avatar for Christopher Wambugu Njuguna

Christopher Wambugu Njuguna

Research Assistant, Carnegie Mellon University, Rwanda
Christopher Wambugu Njuguna is an aspiring data scientist and researcher. He received a B.S. degree in Computer Science from Africa Nazarene University and an M.S. in Information Technology from Carnegie Mellon University in Rwanda. He has worked for over ten years in the information... Read More →



Monday May 16, 2016 12:15 - 13:00
Giraffe 261

12:15

Low Cost Technologies in the Scale up of Health Insurance
Limited Capacity seats available

Health systems in low-income countries face challenges of limited resources, poor access, inequity and poor quality of care. An increasing number of these countries are looking to health insurance schemes as a modality for to addressing such challenges and moving forward in the drive to Universal Health Coverage. However, the lack of professional insurance systems renders many schemes inefficient, in some cases unsustainable and in a lot of cases non scalable. The Insurance Management Information System (IMIS) developed under a Swiss - Tanzanian cooperation project in Tanzania is an example of a technology, which provides cost-effective operability in a rural and informal sector context. The application uses mobile phones to support enrolment, renewals, claims submission and feedback collection processes of insurance schemes.

Experience of implementing IMIS in three countries (Tanzania, Nepal and Cameroon) demonstrates how outreach of health insurance schemes can be increased at low cost and common obstacles like identification mechanisms, accountability towards clients, reaching out to remote areas, accessibility to all network facilities, flexibility of insurance model regarding benefit packages, provider payment mechanisms, pooling of funds, and operational monitoring can be professionally dealt with.


Speakers
SS

Siddharth Srivastava

Health Financing Specialist, Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute
Siddharth is a Health Financing Specialist at the Swiss Centre for International Health of the Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH). He works on health insurance projects for Swiss TPH and is currently engaged on their behalf in Nepal, Tanzania and Cameroon. For... Read More →



Monday May 16, 2016 12:15 - 13:00
Giraffe 260

12:15

mFinance: Is It a Case of Collaboration or Disruption?
Limited Capacity seats available

As mobile operators launch mobile payment services, banks are launching mobile banking services. The adoption of Mobile telephony in Africa has been feted as one of the most progressive in the world, this has open avenues for new and innovates services to be developed on such a success. Mobile payment has been a flagship services developed on this nascent technology. The essence of this session is (1) to assess degree of adoption by different countries in Africa (2) the regulatory argument and (3) the blur boundaries within the mFinance business landscape.

The literature underpinning the ensuing discussion was drawn from the finding analysis of 41 research studies on mFinance in developing countries conducted by Chib et al. (2015), illuminating not only in what it reveals but in the shadows that permeate the field.

From this review we consider two issues as significant. First, trust is highlighted as a mechanism factor that leads to adoption. As the poor relies more on physical money and face-to-face relationships and mediations to exchange money, issues of trust may be important for future research, to understand more of its functions and how to manage it. It is important to note how the literature reports that trust can be transferred, being this a remarkable feature to be applied by mFinance practitioners. Second, are issues of affordability. Even though it is considered a main barrier for adoption, the literature shows that cost is relevant only for some groups. The poor must be thought of as a heterogeneous group.


Speakers
avatar for Kweku Koranteng

Kweku Koranteng

PhD Candidate, School of Public Leadership, Stellenbosch University
Kweku Koranteng a PhD Candidate at the School of Public Leadership, Stellenbosch University and a visiting research fellow at the Department of Information Systems at the University of Ghana Business School. He the founder of a Transdisciplinary Research Network and the co-founder... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 12:15 - 13:00
Giraffe 252

14:00

Digital Inclusion of Young Aspirants
Limited Capacity seats available

A hundred million educated young men and women in rural India remain unemployed due to absence of marketable skills even though the country has increased its GDP significantly. In nine years Anudip has empowered over 50,000 youth for IT-enable jobs and business startups through training in IT and market-aligned job skills. This paper will present technologies that Anudip has deployed to offer blended multimedia learning in an environment of intermittent electrical power and internet in hard-to-access regions, while gearing up to increase its annual training capacity by a factor of ten.

Speakers
avatar for Dipak Basu

Dipak Basu

Chief Executive Officer, Anudip Foundation
Dipak Basu is the Founder of the Anudip Foundation, a non-profit company dedicated to improving livelihoods of poor and marginalized people through skill development in information technology and entrepreneurship. He currently serves as Anudip’s Chairman and CEO. Previously, Dipak... Read More →



Monday May 16, 2016 14:00 - 14:45
Giraffe 260

14:00

SmartMatatu: Sensor Technology in Public Transport
Limited Capacity seats available

In cities across the developing world, semi-formal bus networks are critical to the local infrastructure and economy. Kenya's matatu industry is used by over 30% of the population and is valued at over $2 billion. Yet it is also a major cause of injury and death.

I will present on Echo Mobile's development and testing of SmartMatatu, a sensor-based system designed to align industry incentives, improving safety and profitability. The challenge in Kenya is that matatus are privately owned. Owners lease to drivers, but have no daily visibility into their behavior on the road. They then collect a daily fee, and drivers keep any daily earnings leftover, thereby incentivizing reckless driving to collect more fares. This threatens public safety and creates costs to owners and drivers in the form of fines, repairs, settlements, and reputational damage.

SmartMatatu provides transparency to this arrangement through a GSM-enabled sensor and a phone app that gives owners a real-time look at location, productivity, and safety; provides instant notifications when unsafe events occur; and allows mobile payments to drivers when safety improves. Working with a UC Berkeley team, Echo is conducting a RCT measuring the system's impact, collecting research data through SmartMatatu itself. In line with Echo's Day 2 talk on integrating interventions with evaluations, this project leverages new sensor tech to address a development problem, while seamlessly using that same technology to measure impact.

Speakers
avatar for Boris Maguire

Boris Maguire

Head of Deployment, Echo Mobile



Monday May 16, 2016 14:00 - 14:45
Giraffe 261

14:00

The Role of Mobile Market Information Systems in Agricultural Development
Limited Capacity seats available

A study of the Lima Links platform in Zambia (providing price information) applying mixed methods research involving farmers and other actors related to facilitating the roll out of the tool was conducted. The research provided insight on the realistic role of ICT solutions in agricultural development considering their interaction with farmers and their environment and also explored issues of the platforms sustainability. Further the research provided insight on ICT4D interventions in Southern Africa for the academic and development community considering that information on these interventions is skew to the East African context.

Results show that the provision of efficient market information (or at least price information) can have positive effects on agricultural supply chains benefitting both farmers and traders. Up-to-date or current market information enables farmers to negotiate with traders from a position of greater strength and facilitates spatial distribution of products from rural areas to towns and between markets. In addition, quality historical market information enables farmers to make planting decisions, including those related to new crops.



Speakers
avatar for Nyamwaya Munthali

Nyamwaya Munthali

PhD Candidate/Former Project Manager ICT4D iDE Zambia, Wageningen University and Research Centre
Nyamwaya Munthali is a PhD Candidate at Wageningen University on an ICT4D project, the Environmental Virtual Observatories for Connective Action (EVOCA) Project, running for 4 years from 2016. Formerly she was a Project Manager at iDE Zambia, overseeing the roll out of Lima Links... Read More →



Monday May 16, 2016 14:00 - 14:45
Giraffe 252

14:45

Digital Inclusion of Young Aspirants
Limited Capacity seats available

A hundred million educated young men and women in rural India remain unemployed due to absence of marketable skills even though the country has increased its GDP significantly. In nine years Anudip has empowered over 50,000 youth for IT-enable jobs and business startups through training in IT and market-aligned job skills. This paper will present technologies that Anudip has deployed to offer blended multimedia learning in an environment of intermittent electrical power and internet in hard-to-access regions, while gearing up to increase its annual training capacity by a factor of ten.

Speakers
avatar for Dipak Basu

Dipak Basu

Chief Executive Officer, Anudip Foundation
Dipak Basu is the Founder of the Anudip Foundation, a non-profit company dedicated to improving livelihoods of poor and marginalized people through skill development in information technology and entrepreneurship. He currently serves as Anudip’s Chairman and CEO. Previously, Dipak... Read More →



Monday May 16, 2016 14:45 - 15:30
Giraffe 260

14:45

SmartMatatu: Sensor Technology in Public Transport
Limited Capacity seats available

In cities across the developing world, semi-formal bus networks are critical to the local infrastructure and economy. Kenya's matatu industry is used by over 30% of the population and is valued at over $2 billion. Yet it is also a major cause of injury and death.

I will present on Echo Mobile's development and testing of SmartMatatu, a sensor-based system designed to align industry incentives, improving safety and profitability. The challenge in Kenya is that matatus are privately owned. Owners lease to drivers, but have no daily visibility into their behavior on the road. They then collect a daily fee, and drivers keep any daily earnings leftover, thereby incentivizing reckless driving to collect more fares. This threatens public safety and creates costs to owners and drivers in the form of fines, repairs, settlements, and reputational damage.

SmartMatatu provides transparency to this arrangement through a GSM-enabled sensor and a phone app that gives owners a real-time look at location, productivity, and safety; provides instant notifications when unsafe events occur; and allows mobile payments to drivers when safety improves. Working with a UC Berkeley team, Echo is conducting a RCT measuring the system's impact, collecting research data through SmartMatatu itself. In line with Echo's Day 2 talk on integrating interventions with evaluations, this project leverages new sensor tech to address a development problem, while seamlessly using that same technology to measure impact.

Speakers
avatar for Boris Maguire

Boris Maguire

Head of Deployment, Echo Mobile


Monday May 16, 2016 14:45 - 15:30
Giraffe 261

14:45

The Role of Mobile Market Information Systems in Agricultural Development
Limited Capacity seats available

A case study of the Lima Links platform in Zambia (providing price information) applying ethnographic and in- depth interviews with farmers and other actors related to facilitating the roll out of the tool was conducted. The research provided insight on the realistic role of ICT solutions in agricultural development considering their interaction with farmers and their environment and also explored issues of the platforms sustainability. Further the research provided insight on ICT4D interventions in Southern Africa for the academic and development community considering that information on these interventions is skew to the East African context.

Results show that the provision of efficient market information (or at least price information) can have positive effects on agricultural supply chains benefitting both farmers and traders. Up-to-date or current market information enables farmers to negotiate with traders from a position of greater strength and facilitates spatial distribution of products from rural areas to towns and between markets. In addition, quality historical market information enables farmers to make planting decisions, including those related to new crops. It also permits traders to make better decisions regarding the viability of intra- and, perhaps, inter-seasonal storage.


Speakers
avatar for Nyamwaya Munthali

Nyamwaya Munthali

PhD Candidate/Former Project Manager ICT4D iDE Zambia, Wageningen University and Research Centre
Nyamwaya Munthali is a PhD Candidate at Wageningen University on an ICT4D project, the Environmental Virtual Observatories for Connective Action (EVOCA) Project, running for 4 years from 2016. Formerly she was a Project Manager at iDE Zambia, overseeing the roll out of Lima Links... Read More →



Monday May 16, 2016 14:45 - 15:30
Giraffe 252

16:00

BTC4D
Limited Capacity seats available

An overview of digital currency technologies and where they might fit into the Dev world. Included in the discussion will be an explanation of how the blockchain works, as well as a comparative exploration of the mechanisms powering Bitcoin, Ripple, Ethereum, and Dash. In addition to looking at ledger issues, we’ll also discuss security, privacy, and the emergence of platform-oriented systems like NXT. The discussion will be illustrated with examples of proven uses.


Speakers
avatar for Ric Shreves

Ric Shreves

Manager, Internal Communications & Knowledge Management, Mercy Corps
Come talk to me about blockchain, DLT, or digital currencies in the humanitarian aid and development sector. We're attempting to lead the charge for adoption of these technologies for the benefit of social good. We published a white paper on DLT in relief and development in May of... Read More →



Monday May 16, 2016 16:00 - 16:45
Giraffe 260

16:00

Leveraging ICTs Towards Destination 2030: A Case Study of CITARD
Limited Capacity seats available

In Uganda and most developing countries today, the majority of the population lives in rural areas. Faced with a lot of problems resulting from of lack of empowerment and information, these people cannot industriously perform their roles in society unless rightly informed. Citizens irrespective of location need information on health, food and nutrition, family planning, education, business and agriculture. For the people of Butaleja, the fluctuations between hope and disappointment, expectation and infuriation, has defined their lives for many years. It has for long been an intimidating task for them to get information they need for farming, market prices, pesticides, seeds health and education among other basic needs. The priority for them is to have the right information to enable them face today's challenges but how will they handle such challenges if they can't even get the simple information they need? However, there has been much cause for optimism for the people of Butaleja in the quest for destination 2030. The Communication and Information Technology for Agriculture and Rural Development (CITARD) is at the forefront of addressing their fundamental informational challenges. In this paper, a descriptive case study on how CITARD is meeting the needs of rural people to attain SDGs 1, 2, 4, 6, 7 & 13 will be presented. Benefits, challenges and way forward will also be presented. It is hoped that the paper will benefit a number of stakeholders including rural farmers, rural schools, governments of developing countries, public and community libraries and all community based organizations in the developing world.



Speakers
avatar for Eric Nelson Haumba

Eric Nelson Haumba

Founding Co-Director/ Head of Department Library and Information Services., CITARD/ YMCA Comprehensive Institute Kampala
Eric is the Head of Department Library and Information Services of YMCA Comprehensive Institute Kampala. He is attached to the Agshare project, a methodology that creates a scalable and sustainable collaboration of existing organizations for publishing, localizing, and sharing of... Read More →



Monday May 16, 2016 16:00 - 16:45
Giraffe 252

16:00

Technology for Empowering Street Traders in Least Developed Countries
Limited Capacity seats available

The informal sector employs the major part of poor in developing countries. Street trading is a common form of informal employment among the youth in LDCs. Despite its huge economic in LDCs, not enough is being done to improve their empowerment and entrepreneurship. Also, development informatics is over-focused on social development and under-focused on economic development. This paper presents our design science initiatives to empower street traders through mobile technology in Tanzania. It falls under goal 8 (Decent work and economic growth).
Specifically the paper shows
- Findings from design science research (DSR) in order to identify barriers of street traders in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania,
- Ongoing Project for developing mobile phone applications for street traders business
- Technology based street traders business school
- The proposed technology for street traders business

.


Speakers
avatar for Nasibu Rajabu Mramba

Nasibu Rajabu Mramba

PhD Candidate and Lecturer, College of Business Education (CBE)
Nasibu Mramba is a Business Lecturer at the College of Business Education-Tanzania. He is teaching Small Business Management, Marketing and Youth Entrepreneurship. He is a holder of a Bachelor Degree in Marketing & Msc. International Trade. Currently he is perusing PhD in Business... Read More →



Monday May 16, 2016 16:00 - 16:45
Giraffe 261

16:45

BTC4D
Limited Capacity full

An overview of digital currency technologies and where they might fit into the Dev world. Included in the discussion will be an explanation of how the blockchain works, as well as a comparative exploration of the mechanisms powering Bitcoin, Ripple, Ethereum, and Dash. In addition to looking at ledger issues, we’ll also discuss security, privacy, and the emergence of platform-oriented systems like NXT. The discussion will be illustrated with examples of proven uses.


Speakers
avatar for Ric Shreves

Ric Shreves

Manager, Internal Communications & Knowledge Management, Mercy Corps
Come talk to me about blockchain, DLT, or digital currencies in the humanitarian aid and development sector. We're attempting to lead the charge for adoption of these technologies for the benefit of social good. We published a white paper on DLT in relief and development in May of... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 16:45 - 17:30
Giraffe 260

16:45

Leveraging ICTs towards Destination 2030: A case study of CITARD
Limited Capacity seats available

A nation that neglects the development and empowerment of the rural communities should not expect significant socio-economic transformation. Consequently, social problems in Uganda are growing. Poverty, disease and illiteracy are by-far the major barriers to Uganda's rural populace. All these problems are being cultivated by the lack of information. It's clearly evident that information hunger is prevalent and biting hard on our rural communities, which has resulted in illiteracy, poverty and in some areas of the country miserable hunger.
In Uganda and most developing countries today, the majority of the population lives in rural areas. Faced with a lot of problems resulting from of lack of empowerment and information, these people cannot industriously perform their roles in society unless rightly informed. Citizens irrespective of location, need information on health, food and nutrition, family planning, education, business and agriculture. For the people of Butaleja, the fluctuations between hope and disappointment, expectation and infuriation, has defined their lives for many years. It has for long been an intimidating task for them to get information they need for farming, market prices, pesticides, seeds health and education among other basic needs. The priority for them is to have the right information to enable them face today's challenges but how will they handle such challenges if they can't even get the simple information they need? However, there has been much cause for optimism for the people of Butaleja in the quest for destination 2030. The Communication and Information Technology for Agriculture and Rural Development (CITARD) is at the forefront of addressing their fundamental informational challenges. In this paper, a descriptive case study on how CITARD is meeting the needs of rural people to attain SDGs 1, 2, 4, 6, 7 & 13 will be presented. Benefits, challenges and way forward will also be presented. It is hoped that the paper will benefit a number of stakeholders including rural farmers, rural schools, governments of developing countries, public and community libraries and all community based organizations in the developing world.

Speakers
avatar for Eric Nelson Haumba

Eric Nelson Haumba

Founding Co-Director/ Head of Department Library and Information Services., CITARD/ YMCA Comprehensive Institute Kampala
Eric is the Head of Department Library and Information Services of YMCA Comprehensive Institute Kampala. He is attached to the Agshare project, a methodology that creates a scalable and sustainable collaboration of existing organizations for publishing, localizing, and sharing of... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 16:45 - 17:30
Giraffe 252

16:45

Technology for Empowering Street Traders in Least Developed Countries
Limited Capacity seats available

The informal sector employs the major part of poor in developing countries. Street trading is a common form of informal employment among the youth in LDCs. Despite its huge economic in LDCs, not enough is being done to improve their empowerment and entrepreneurship. Also, development informatics is over-focused on social development and under-focused on economic development. This paper presents our design science initiatives to empower street traders through mobile technology in Tanzania. It falls under goal 8 (Decent work and economic growth).
Specifically the paper shows
- Findings from design science research (DSR) in order to identify barriers of street traders in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania,
- Ongoing Project for developing mobile phone applications for street traders business
- Technology based street traders business school
- The proposed technology for street traders business

.


Speakers
avatar for Nasibu Rajabu Mramba

Nasibu Rajabu Mramba

PhD Candidate and Lecturer, College of Business Education (CBE)
Nasibu Mramba is a Business Lecturer at the College of Business Education-Tanzania. He is teaching Small Business Management, Marketing and Youth Entrepreneurship. He is a holder of a Bachelor Degree in Marketing & Msc. International Trade. Currently he is perusing PhD in Business... Read More →



Monday May 16, 2016 16:45 - 17:30
Giraffe 261
 
Tuesday, May 17
 

10:45

From Cash to M-Money for Enhanced Access to Family Planning in Selected Rural Ghana
Limited Capacity seats available

Family planning is the key to attaining the sustainable development goals (SDGs). Access to family planning and other health protection products and services is often hindered by a number of factors. These factors include financial barriers. Their situation is compounded by the high cost of travels to resupply products to such locations and the challenges associated with collection of payments for those products supplied. Majority of them are unbanked. These factors lead to stock out of commodities, which affects uptake of family planning and the general, health and wellbeing of the community members.

Mobile money (MM) service was introduced in Ghana in 2009.

HealthKeepers Network (HKN) uses a micro franchise system to distribute family planning (FP) and other health protection products to the rural and underserved communities through Community Based Distributors (CBDs). The CBDs are given training on Family Planning and Diarrhea Management to promote a healthy lifestyle and provide their peers with reliable access to comprehensive information on family planning and short-term FP products as well as other quality health protection products.

HKN's Mobile Money payment initiative (with funding support from USAID/NetHope Solutions) is to increase access to family planning and other health protection products to ensure healthy lives. The CBDs are trained on the benefits of Mobile Money system and how it can be used to make payments or receive payments for remittances, products and services.



Speakers
avatar for Grace Morton-Bruce

Grace Morton-Bruce

Field Officer, HealthKeepers Network
I am a field officer working with HealthKeepers Network community-based family planning program. I have a four (4) year working experience with the program in community entry and advocacy, recruitment and selection of community-based distributors and in their training. | I meet... Read More →



Tuesday May 17, 2016 10:45 - 11:30
Giraffe 205

10:45

Human Empowered Computing - How to tackle Big Data?
Limited Capacity filling up

It has been established throughout the world that the digital economy is characterized by unmet demand for trained staff and a large number of aspirants without job skills, and with no opportunities to prosper from that economy. Despite advances in big data analytics, machine learning, search and categorization algorithms; human intelligence is still the best tool for data cleansing, categorization, enrichment, and curation. We know that unrefined, incomplete or insufficient data sets can sometimes be more of a challenge than a benefit where doing data enrichment with our teams acting as the workforce had enabled a global news outlet to enrich over 1.2 million pieces of data from news articles over the course of two years. This has provided a different way for users to navigate through the content and for the creation of reference content to prolong the duration of news content. From customer service tickets, to the agricultural and health impact, to user-generated content, the rural youth and women had been the teams who had not only categorized most data types where they feed this data to your algorithms, or return it to your teams in whatever form needed, ensuring that your search and categorization functions deliver exactly what your users seek. iMerit is here to deliver all these digital services to its clients by training these young men and women on market-aligned skills to effect positive social and economic change.

Speakers
avatar for Radha Basu

Radha Basu

Chief Executive Officer, iMerit Technology Services Pvt. Ltd.
Radha Ramaswami Basu has over 30 years’ experience in executive management and is widely recognized as a leading woman technology entrepreneur. Radha grew Hewlett Packard’s electronic business software division into a $1.5 billion business. She then held the position of Chairman... Read More →



Tuesday May 17, 2016 10:45 - 11:30
Giraffe 208

10:45

Low-Cost Digital Data Collection in Semi-Arid Lands
Limited Capacity seats available

The BOMA Project implements a high-impact poverty graduation program for ultra-poor women in the arid and semi-arid lands (ASAL) of Northern Kenya. Poverty graduation programs have recently received great attention for their scientific validation of their effectiveness in promoting resilience and improving livelihoods of the extreme poor. Providing such multifaceted sequenced interventions in extremely remote areas in a cost effective way requires technology-driven solutions. To address this challenge, BOMA is leveraging innovative, low-cost, mobile solutions supported by a cloud based backend system (Salesforce) for data collection and program monitoring. This has resulted in greater operational efficiencies, real time data analysis and improved data accuracy. Android tablets installed with TaroWorks are used by Mentors who provide mentoring and support to businesses and savings groups on a monthly basis, while entering data on business and savings group performance and GPS location. Laptops installed with android emulators equipped with TaroWorks are used to collect data on the participants entering BOMA's two-year business training program at baseline and after two years. Field Officers and Monitoring and Evaluation staff monitor performance of mentors, businesses and savings groups on a daily basis using SalesForce. BOMA businesses and savings groups have benefited by rapid follow-up when performance is weak, and from identifying and learning from the top performing businesses and mentors. This low-cost and highly effective solution has enabled BOMA to effectively demonstrate the impact of its programs and ensure that participants graduate from extreme poverty after two years.

Speakers
avatar for Jim Anderson

Jim Anderson

Country Director, The BOMA Project
Jim Anderson is Country Director for The BOMA Project based in Nanyuki, Kenya. His unique background bridges the technology world and sub-Sahara Africa. A former systems engineer, he spent more than 20 years in Silicon Valley financing technology companies, eventually launching and... Read More →



Tuesday May 17, 2016 10:45 - 11:30
Giraffe 207

10:45

Using Tech to Disrupt Formal and Informal Labor Markets
Limited Capacity seats available

Mozambique is a typical African emerging market, but with a growing economy (GDP growth rate of 7%) and high disparities in the living conditions of the majority of the population. In late 2011, my co-founder and I became aware of a discrepancy in the Mozambican labor market: most job positions were being advertised daily on a mere 15,000 copies of the largest local newspaper, while Mozambique's population was nearly 25 million people. As a result, potential candidates were unaware of relevant job opportunities while companies struggled to find local talent. Set to democratize the information in the labor market, we developed emprego.co.mz an online job board that would later become the largest in the country. It currently engages over 80,000 followers on social media, hosts 15,000 daily visits and has more than 70,000 registered candidates.
Despite its success, the focus on Internet users, accounted only for 10% of the population. Additionally, we became aware of the fact that there where only 700,000 formal jobs in Mozambique. Statistics are inconsistent when it comes to employment - official levels state 17% of unemployment even though around 95% of the country's economy is informal. Given this high level of informality and the realization that we've been catering for a fairly privileged niche, we then crafted a solution for informal handymen with access to basic mobile phones.
We developed Biscate, a hybrid technology (Web & USSD) to connect blue-collar workers (e.g. carpenters, painters), with no Internet access, to labor seekers on the web. Biscate aims to increase job opportunities at the BOP, fostering competitiveness and skill building, making a significant contribution to social inclusion by linking 2 social classes through a mutual need.

Speakers
avatar for Frederico Peres da Silva

Frederico Peres da Silva

CEO, UX Information Technologies
Frederico P. Silva, former country manager at LG Electronics, has over six years' experience in sales and marketing. In the past three years, he has become a social entrepreneur in the field of ICT4D and co-founded UX, an award-winning start-up recognized for its work in addressing... Read More →


Tuesday May 17, 2016 10:45 - 11:30
Giraffe 206

11:30

From Cash to M-Money for Enhanced Access to Family Planning in Selected Rural Ghana
Limited Capacity seats available

Family planning is the key to attaining the sustainable development goals (SDGs). Access to family planning and other health protection products and services is often hindered by a number of factors. These factors include financial barriers. Their situation is compounded by the high cost of travels to resupply products to such locations and the challenges associated with collection of payments for those products supplied. Majority of them are unbanked. These factors lead to stock out of commodities, which affects uptake of family planning and the general, health and wellbeing of the community members.

Mobile money (MM) service was introduced in Ghana in 2009.

HealthKeepers Network (HKN) uses a micro franchise system to distribute family planning (FP) and other health protection products to the rural and underserved communities through Community Based Distributors (CBDs). The CBDs are given training on Family Planning and Diarrhea Management to promote a healthy lifestyle and provide their peers with reliable access to comprehensive information on family planning and short-term FP products as well as other quality health protection products.

HKN's Mobile Money payment initiative (with funding support from USAID/NetHope Solutions) is to increase access to family planning and other health protection products to ensure healthy lives. The CBDs are trained on the benefits of Mobile Money system and how it can be used to make payments or receive payments for remittances, products and services.


Speakers
avatar for Grace Morton-Bruce

Grace Morton-Bruce

Field Officer, HealthKeepers Network
I am a field officer working with HealthKeepers Network community-based family planning program. I have a four (4) year working experience with the program in community entry and advocacy, recruitment and selection of community-based distributors and in their training. | I meet... Read More →



Tuesday May 17, 2016 11:30 - 12:15
Giraffe 205

11:30

Human Empowered Computing - How to tackle Big Data?
Limited Capacity filling up

It has been established throughout the world that the digital economy is characterized by unmet demand for trained staff and a large number of aspirants without job skills, and with no opportunities to prosper from that economy. Despite advances in big data analytics, machine learning, search and categorization algorithms; human intelligence is still the best tool for data cleansing, categorization, enrichment, and curation. We know that unrefined, incomplete or insufficient data sets can sometimes be more of a challenge than a benefit where doing data enrichment with our teams acting as the workforce had enabled a global news outlet to enrich over 1.2 million pieces of data from news articles over the course of two years. This has provided a different way for users to navigate through the content and for the creation of reference content to prolong the duration of news content. From customer service tickets, to the agricultural and health impact, to user-generated content, the rural youth and women had been the teams who had not only categorized most data types where they feed this data to your algorithms, or return it to your teams in whatever form needed, ensuring that your search and categorization functions deliver exactly what your users seek. iMerit is here to deliver all these digital services to its clients by training these young men and women on market-aligned skills to effect positive social and economic change.

Speakers
avatar for Radha Basu

Radha Basu

Chief Executive Officer, iMerit Technology Services Pvt. Ltd.
Radha Ramaswami Basu has over 30 years’ experience in executive management and is widely recognized as a leading woman technology entrepreneur. Radha grew Hewlett Packard’s electronic business software division into a $1.5 billion business. She then held the position of Chairman... Read More →



Tuesday May 17, 2016 11:30 - 12:15
Giraffe 208

11:30

Low-Cost Digital Data Collection in Semi-Arid Lands
Limited Capacity seats available

The BOMA Project implements a high-impact poverty graduation program for ultra-poor women in the arid and semi-arid lands (ASAL) of Northern Kenya. Poverty graduation programs have recently received great attention for their scientific validation of their effectiveness in promoting resilience and improving livelihoods of the extreme poor. Providing such multifaceted sequenced interventions in extremely remote areas in a cost effective way requires technology-driven solutions. To address this challenge, BOMA is leveraging innovative, low-cost, mobile solutions supported by a cloud based backend system (Salesforce) for data collection and program monitoring. This has resulted in greater operational efficiencies, real time data analysis and improved data accuracy. Android tablets installed with TaroWorks are used by Mentors who provide mentoring and support to businesses and savings groups on a monthly basis, while entering data on business and savings group performance and GPS location. Laptops installed with android emulators equipped with TaroWorks are used to collect data on the participants entering BOMA's two-year business training program at baseline and after two years. Field Officers and Monitoring and Evaluation staff monitor performance of mentors, businesses and savings groups on a daily basis using SalesForce. BOMA businesses and savings groups have benefited by rapid follow-up when performance is weak, and from identifying and learning from the top performing businesses and mentors. This low-cost and highly effective solution has enabled BOMA to effectively demonstrate the impact of its programs and ensure that participants graduate from extreme poverty after two years.

Speakers
avatar for Jim Anderson

Jim Anderson

Country Director, The BOMA Project
Jim Anderson is Country Director for The BOMA Project based in Nanyuki, Kenya. His unique background bridges the technology world and sub-Sahara Africa. A former systems engineer, he spent more than 20 years in Silicon Valley financing technology companies, eventually launching and... Read More →


Tuesday May 17, 2016 11:30 - 12:15
Giraffe 207

11:30

Using Tech to Disrupt Formal and Informal Labor Markets
Limited Capacity seats available

Mozambique is a typical African emerging market, but with a growing economy (GDP growth rate of 7%) and high disparities in the living conditions of the majority of the population. In late 2011, my co-founder and I became aware of a discrepancy in the Mozambican labor market: most job positions were being advertised daily on a mere 15,000 copies of the largest local newspaper, while Mozambique's population was nearly 25 million people. As a result, potential candidates were unaware of relevant job opportunities while companies struggled to find local talent. Set to democratize the information in the labor market, we developed emprego.co.mz an online job board that would later become the largest in the country. It currently engages over 80,000 followers on social media, hosts 15,000 daily visits and has more than 70,000 registered candidates.
Despite its success, the focus on Internet users, accounted only for 10% of the population. Additionally, we became aware of the fact that there where only 700,000 formal jobs in Mozambique. Statistics are inconsistent when it comes to employment - official levels state 17% of unemployment even though around 95% of the country's economy is informal. Given this high level of informality and the realization that we've been catering for a fairly privileged niche, we then crafted a solution for informal handymen with access to basic mobile phones.
We developed Biscate, a hybrid technology (Web & USSD) to connect blue-collar workers (e.g. carpenters, painters), with no Internet access, to labor seekers on the web. Biscate aims to increase job opportunities at the BOP, fostering competitiveness and skill building, making a significant contribution to social inclusion by linking 2 social classes through a mutual need.

Speakers
avatar for Frederico Peres da Silva

Frederico Peres da Silva

CEO, UX Information Technologies
Frederico P. Silva, former country manager at LG Electronics, has over six years' experience in sales and marketing. In the past three years, he has become a social entrepreneur in the field of ICT4D and co-founded UX, an award-winning start-up recognized for its work in addressing... Read More →


Tuesday May 17, 2016 11:30 - 12:15
Giraffe 206

12:15

From Cash to M-Money for Enhanced Access to Family Planning in Selected Rural Ghana
Limited Capacity seats available

Family planning is the key to attaining the sustainable development goals (SDGs). Access to family planning and other health protection products and services is often hindered by a number of factors. These factors include financial barriers. Their situation is compounded by the high cost of travels to resupply products to such locations and the challenges associated with collection of payments for those products supplied. Majority of them are unbanked. These factors lead to stock out of commodities, which affects uptake of family planning and the general, health and wellbeing of the community members..

HealthKeepers Network (HKN) uses a micro franchise system to distribute family planning (FP) and other health protection products to the rural and underserved communities through Community Based Distributors (CBDs). The CBDs are given training on Family Planning and Diarrhea Management to promote a healthy lifestyle and provide their peers with reliable access to comprehensive information on family planning and short-term FP products as well as other quality health protection products.

HKN's Mobile Money payment initiative (with funding support from USAID/NetHope Solutions) is to increase access to family planning and other health protection products to ensure healthy lives. The CBDs are trained on the benefits of Mobile Money system and how it can be used to make payments or receive payments for remittances, products and services.


Speakers
avatar for Grace Morton-Bruce

Grace Morton-Bruce

Field Officer, HealthKeepers Network
I am a field officer working with HealthKeepers Network community-based family planning program. I have a four (4) year working experience with the program in community entry and advocacy, recruitment and selection of community-based distributors and in their training. | I meet... Read More →



Tuesday May 17, 2016 12:15 - 13:00
Giraffe 205

12:15

Human Empowered Computing - How to tackle Big Data?
Limited Capacity seats available

It has been established throughout the world that the digital economy is characterized by unmet demand for trained staff and a large number of aspirants without job skills, and with no opportunities to prosper from that economy. Despite advances in big data analytics, machine learning, search and categorization algorithms; human intelligence is still the best tool for data cleansing, categorization, enrichment, and curation. We know that unrefined, incomplete or insufficient data sets can sometimes be more of a challenge than a benefit where doing data enrichment with our teams acting as the workforce had enabled a global news outlet to enrich over 1.2 million pieces of data from news articles over the course of two years. This has provided a different way for users to navigate through the content and for the creation of reference content to prolong the duration of news content. From customer service tickets, to the agricultural and health impact, to user-generated content, the rural youth and women had been the teams who had not only categorized most data types where they feed this data to your algorithms, or return it to your teams in whatever form needed, ensuring that your search and categorization functions deliver exactly what your users seek. iMerit is here to deliver all these digital services to its clients by training these young men and women on market-aligned skills to effect positive social and economic change.

Speakers
avatar for Radha Basu

Radha Basu

Chief Executive Officer, iMerit Technology Services Pvt. Ltd.
Radha Ramaswami Basu has over 30 years’ experience in executive management and is widely recognized as a leading woman technology entrepreneur. Radha grew Hewlett Packard’s electronic business software division into a $1.5 billion business. She then held the position of Chairman... Read More →



Tuesday May 17, 2016 12:15 - 13:00
Giraffe 208

12:15

Low-Cost Digital Data Collection in Semi-Arid Lands
Limited Capacity seats available

The BOMA Project implements a high-impact poverty graduation program for ultra-poor women in the arid and semi-arid lands (ASAL) of Northern Kenya. Poverty graduation programs have recently received great attention for their scientific validation of their effectiveness in promoting resilience and improving livelihoods of the extreme poor. Providing such multifaceted sequenced interventions in extremely remote areas in a cost effective way requires technology-driven solutions. To address this challenge, BOMA is leveraging innovative, low-cost, mobile solutions supported by a cloud based backend system (Salesforce) for data collection and program monitoring. This has resulted in greater operational efficiencies, real time data analysis and improved data accuracy. Android tablets installed with TaroWorks are used by Mentors who provide mentoring and support to businesses and savings groups on a monthly basis, while entering data on business and savings group performance and GPS location. Laptops installed with android emulators equipped with TaroWorks are used to collect data on the participants entering BOMA's two-year business training program at baseline and after two years. Field Officers and Monitoring and Evaluation staff monitor performance of mentors, businesses and savings groups on a daily basis using SalesForce. BOMA businesses and savings groups have benefited by rapid follow-up when performance is weak, and from identifying and learning from the top performing businesses and mentors. This low-cost and highly effective solution has enabled BOMA to effectively demonstrate the impact of its programs and ensure that participants graduate from extreme poverty after two years.

Speakers
avatar for Jim Anderson

Jim Anderson

Country Director, The BOMA Project
Jim Anderson is Country Director for The BOMA Project based in Nanyuki, Kenya. His unique background bridges the technology world and sub-Sahara Africa. A former systems engineer, he spent more than 20 years in Silicon Valley financing technology companies, eventually launching and... Read More →


Tuesday May 17, 2016 12:15 - 13:00
Giraffe 207

12:15

Using Tech to Disrupt Formal and Informal Labor Markets
Limited Capacity seats available

Mozambique is a typical African emerging market, but with a growing economy (GDP growth rate of 7%) and high disparities in the living conditions of the majority of the population. In late 2011, my co-founder and I became aware of a discrepancy in the Mozambican labor market: most job positions were being advertised daily on a mere 15,000 copies of the largest local newspaper, while Mozambique's population was nearly 25 million people. As a result, potential candidates were unaware of relevant job opportunities while companies struggled to find local talent. Set to democratize the information in the labor market, we developed emprego.co.mz an online job board that would later become the largest in the country. It currently engages over 80,000 followers on social media, hosts 15,000 daily visits and has more than 70,000 registered candidates.
Despite its success, the focus on Internet users, accounted only for 10% of the population. Additionally, we became aware of the fact that there where only 700,000 formal jobs in Mozambique. Statistics are inconsistent when it comes to employment - official levels state 17% of unemployment even though around 95% of the country's economy is informal. Given this high level of informality and the realization that we've been catering for a fairly privileged niche, we then crafted a solution for informal handymen with access to basic mobile phones.
We developed Biscate, a hybrid technology (Web & USSD) to connect blue-collar workers (e.g. carpenters, painters), with no Internet access, to labor seekers on the web. Biscate aims to increase job opportunities at the BOP, fostering competitiveness and skill building, making a significant contribution to social inclusion by linking 2 social classes through a mutual need.

Speakers
avatar for Frederico Peres da Silva

Frederico Peres da Silva

CEO, UX Information Technologies
Frederico P. Silva, former country manager at LG Electronics, has over six years' experience in sales and marketing. In the past three years, he has become a social entrepreneur in the field of ICT4D and co-founded UX, an award-winning start-up recognized for its work in addressing... Read More →


Tuesday May 17, 2016 12:15 - 13:00
Giraffe 206

14:00

ICT Initiatives of Rural Development in India : A Review
Limited Capacity seats available

The term 'rural development' also represents improvement in quality of life of rural population. ICT is an integral part of the developmental strategies of both developing and developed nations. ICT applications can enhance poor people's opportunities by improving their access to markets, agriculture, basic education and health. Furthermore, ICT can empower the poor mass by expanding the use of government services and reduce risks by widening access to micro-finance. My paper has elaborately analyzed about variety of fairly straightforward successful rural ICT interventions which have shown a greater impact on agricultural production, post-harvest activities, basic computer literacy, adult literacy etc.


Speakers
avatar for Dillip Pattanaik

Dillip Pattanaik

Team Leader, IRMA-India (ICT4D Division of OSVSWA)
Dillip, a development professional, has been relentlessly pursuing research and action research for upliftment of rural and isolated communities through various developmental activities promoting and disseminating affordable technologies. Reiterating his commitment to ensure and enhance... Read More →


Tuesday May 17, 2016 14:00 - 14:45
Giraffe 208

14:00

Leveraging Technology for Affordable Quality Healthcare in East Africa
Limited Capacity seats available

Uniformly, actors in the health sector identify technology innovation and the increasing penetration of mobile phones as a trend that will influence East Africa's health sector. There are exciting technology trends evolving across East Africa that could potentially affect the health sector. Some of these trends include low cost diagnostic devices, wearable technologies, tele-medicine and widespread adoption of Electronic Medical Record systems (EMRs).

There are changes in technology that support innovation in these areas such as increasing penetration of smartphones that have capability to be monitoring devices as well as house health applications; the rollout of 4G mobile networks across East Africa that offer high speed mobile data; faster internet through broadband connections and reducing cost of hardware components.

Yet, while the health sector in East Africa could potentially benefit from digital innovation in a similar way to financial services, agriculture and renewable energy sectors, this is not happening.

This seeming disconnect between the health and IT sectors in East Africa, based on our research, led the SEAD East Africa team to conceptualize and host Kenya's first health hackathon in September 2015. The hackathon was designed to provide a space for collaborative creative problem solving around critical needs in the healthcare sector. The goal of the event was to creatively facilitate connections between health entrepreneurs and the technology community in East Africa so that both groups could better understand the market opportunity in the healthcare technology space.

This presentation seeks to share the key insights from the SEAD Health Hackathon, demonstrate the market potential in digital health and spur discussion on how to better leverage ICT in the health sector.



Speakers
avatar for Dr. Patricia Odero

Dr. Patricia Odero

Regional Director East Africa, Innovations in Healthcare - SEAD
Dr. Patricia Odero is the Regional Director - East Africa for Innovations in Healthcare responsible for leading the SEAD East Africa initiative. In this role she builds partnerships in East Africa with funders, universities, corporations and Innovations in Healthcare/SEAD innovators... Read More →



Tuesday May 17, 2016 14:00 - 14:45
Giraffe 207

14:00

Scaling Mobile Money Payments in Kenya
Limited Capacity full

If you needed to send 1000 shillings to tens of thousands of teachers all over Kenya, every time they attended one of your training sessions - how would you do it? If your answer involves millions of bank notes, armored vehicles and stacks of paper miles high, then you must have arrived in a time machine or perhaps from a western country that hasn't yet caught up to Kenya. Clearly the answer is to use mobile money, but the power of mobile payments is old news. Everyone knows that it is easy to send money. But is it easy to send it at scale? How do you reliably send money to 150,000 people being trained over a two week period? How do you confirm that you are using the correct phone number, that they actually attended the training? How do you interface with the mobile network operator. Will the operator give you a discount if you send 150 million shillings in one go?

Mobile payments have created new opportunities to undertake projects that simply weren't possible before. But standard approaches and best practices are still evolving, especially for large scale operations. RTI's Tusome project has combined technologies including interactive SMS, a cloud database, large teams of data processors and good old fashioned excel spreadsheets to leverage mobile money at scale. But now with Safaricom's API, camera equipped phones and other technology there are even more opportunities for improved efficiency.

Speakers
avatar for Michael McKay

Michael McKay

Technologist, RTI International
Mike McKay is a technology optimist living in Nairobi. He has spent the last twelve years applying technology to challenges in sub-Saharan Africa including financial inclusion, HIV care & treatment, diabetes & hypertension management, corruption reporting, malaria surveillance, early... Read More →


Tuesday May 17, 2016 14:00 - 14:45
Giraffe 206

14:00

Using ICT as a Driver towards Accountability and Impact
Limited Capacity filling up

We will showcase Christian Aid Kenya’s Health projects working with the mHealth platform and other digital data gathering and analysis tools. We will not only showcase our technology platform but also demonstrate how we have integrated various aspects of programming in our work. In particular providing solutions that are responsive to the needs of the communities we work with and how these are sensitive to their cultural dynamics and other practical needs.


Speakers
avatar for Jimmy Obuya

Jimmy Obuya

Program Officer, Christian Aid, Kenya
A passion for integrated systems and networks both artificial and social. Love how ICT is evolving and becoming a necessity in development work. Believer in organic growth of innovations and validation of the same to help solve day to day problems.



Tuesday May 17, 2016 14:00 - 14:45
Giraffe 205

14:45

ICT Initiatives of Rural Development in India : A Review
Limited Capacity seats available

The term 'rural development' also represents improvement in quality of life of rural population. ICT is an integral part of the developmental strategies of both developing and developed nations. ICT applications can enhance poor people's opportunities by improving their access to markets, agriculture, basic education and health. Furthermore, ICT can empower the poor mass by expanding the use of government services and reduce risks by widening access to micro-finance. My paper has elaborately analyzed about variety of fairly straightforward successful rural ICT interventions which have shown a greater impact on agricultural production, post-harvest activities, basic computer literacy, adult literacy etc.


Speakers
avatar for Dillip Pattanaik

Dillip Pattanaik

Team Leader, IRMA-India (ICT4D Division of OSVSWA)
Dillip, a development professional, has been relentlessly pursuing research and action research for upliftment of rural and isolated communities through various developmental activities promoting and disseminating affordable technologies. Reiterating his commitment to ensure and enhance... Read More →


Tuesday May 17, 2016 14:45 - 15:30
Giraffe 208

14:45

Leveraging Technology for Affordable Quality Healthcare in East Africa
Limited Capacity seats available

Uniformly, actors in the health sector identify technology innovation and the increasing penetration of mobile phones as a trend that will influence East Africa's health sector. There are exciting technology trends evolving across East Africa that could potentially affect the health sector. Some of these trends include low cost diagnostic devices, wearable technologies, tele-medicine and widespread adoption of Electronic Medical Record systems (EMRs).

There are changes in technology that support innovation in these areas such as increasing penetration of smartphones that have capability to be monitoring devices as well as house health applications; the rollout of 4G mobile networks across East Africa that offer high speed mobile data; faster internet through broadband connections and reducing cost of hardware components.

Yet, while the health sector in East Africa could potentially benefit from digital innovation in a similar way to financial services, agriculture and renewable energy sectors, this is not happening.

This seeming disconnect between the health and IT sectors in East Africa, based on our research, led the SEAD East Africa team to conceptualize and host Kenya's first health hackathon in September 2015. The hackathon was designed to provide a space for collaborative creative problem solving around critical needs in the healthcare sector. The goal of the event was to creatively facilitate connections between health entrepreneurs and the technology community in East Africa so that both groups could better understand the market opportunity in the healthcare technology space.

This presentation seeks to share the key insights from the SEAD Health Hackathon, demonstrate the market potential in digital health and spur discussion on how to better leverage ICT in the health sector.


Speakers
avatar for Dr. Patricia Odero

Dr. Patricia Odero

Regional Director East Africa, Innovations in Healthcare - SEAD
Dr. Patricia Odero is the Regional Director - East Africa for Innovations in Healthcare responsible for leading the SEAD East Africa initiative. In this role she builds partnerships in East Africa with funders, universities, corporations and Innovations in Healthcare/SEAD innovators... Read More →


Tuesday May 17, 2016 14:45 - 15:30
Giraffe 207

14:45

Scaling Mobile Money Payments in Kenya
Limited Capacity seats available

If you needed to send 1000 shillings to tens of thousands of teachers all over Kenya, every time they attended one of your training sessions - how would you do it? If your answer involves millions of bank notes, armored vehicles and stacks of paper miles high, then you must have arrived in a time machine or perhaps from a western country that hasn't yet caught up to Kenya. Clearly the answer is to use mobile money, but the power of mobile payments is old news. Everyone knows that it is easy to send money. But is it easy to send it at scale? How do you reliably send money to 150,000 people being trained over a two week period? How do you confirm that you are using the correct phone number, that they actually attended the training? How do you interface with the mobile network operator. Will the operator give you a discount if you send 150 million shillings in one go?

Mobile payments have created new opportunities to undertake projects that simply weren't possible before. But standard approaches and best practices are still evolving, especially for large scale operations. RTI's Tusome project has combined technologies including interactive SMS, a cloud database, large teams of data processors and good old fashioned excel spreadsheets to leverage mobile money at scale. But now with Safaricom's API, camera equipped phones and other technology there are even more opportunities for improved efficiency.

Speakers
avatar for Michael McKay

Michael McKay

Technologist, RTI International
Mike McKay is a technology optimist living in Nairobi. He has spent the last twelve years applying technology to challenges in sub-Saharan Africa including financial inclusion, HIV care & treatment, diabetes & hypertension management, corruption reporting, malaria surveillance, early... Read More →


Tuesday May 17, 2016 14:45 - 15:30
Giraffe 206

14:45

Using ICT as a Driver towards Accountability and Impact
Limited Capacity seats available

We will showcase Christian Aid Kenya’s Health projects working with the mHealth platform and other digital data gathering and analysis tools. We will not only showcase our technology platform but also demonstrate how we have integrated various aspects of programming in our work. In particular providing solutions that are responsive to the needs of the communities we work with and how these are sensitive to their cultural dynamics and other practical needs.


Speakers
avatar for Jimmy Obuya

Jimmy Obuya

Program Officer, Christian Aid, Kenya
A passion for integrated systems and networks both artificial and social. Love how ICT is evolving and becoming a necessity in development work. Believer in organic growth of innovations and validation of the same to help solve day to day problems.



Tuesday May 17, 2016 14:45 - 15:30
Giraffe 205

16:00

Powering ICT and Livelihoods for Development in Uganda
Limited Capacity seats available

The Connectivity, Electricity, and Education for Entrepreneurship (CE3) program in Uganda seeks to overcome two technology building blocks in the livelihoods sector: power and connectivity. Solar micro-grid power is provided to ICT labs as well as for productive uses such as small machinery and refrigeration. Internet connectivity is provided for market analysis and research to improve profitability. Computer-based entrepreneurship and ICT training is provided to help micro and small businesses make the best use of the ICT resources at their disposal.

The program is a joint enterprise by global corporations such as Accenture, Lenovo, and SunEdison, the University of Notre Dame, and local stakeholders such as BOSCO Uganda, schools, community centers, and business and government institutions.

The presentation will discuss the lessons from providing electricity, ICT services, and entrepreneurship training to small businesses; challenges in implementation and innovative solutions to those challenges; productive uses of CE3 energy; and the synergy between provision of energy and ICT4D. The presentation will focus especially on new efforts to use and evaluate the effectiveness of ICT connections between local businesses and international mentors.


Speakers
avatar for Joey Rich

Joey Rich

Project Coordinator, BOSCO Uganda
Joey is entrepreneur and software developer with a passion for applying technology to the problems of developing nations. Joey received his Bachelor's degree in Computer Science from the University of Notre Dame in 2012. Joey has several years of software development experience and... Read More →


CE3 ppt pptx

Tuesday May 17, 2016 16:00 - 16:45
Giraffe 208

16:00

Rural Digital Empowerment
Limited Capacity seats available

With the announcement of Digital India Program and with the cheap, handy tools like smartphones ICT has now finally reached the door steps of Rural India. Such untapped section of the population (almost 27% of total population of India) had started realizing the opportunities that were presented by connectivity. There is a need to have a methodical knowledge-sharing system which ensured that users do not loose themselves in the vast jungle of the internet. The Atma (Soul) of Rural India is of course Agriculture, and today many applications like MKisan MyRML are available for Agri. Extension, Rural development

The success story of Digital Platforms created by MGIRI for holistic Rural Empowerment and how we are reaching Stakeholders through our Digital Rural Empowerment Program is shared in this presentation

Speakers
avatar for Pragati Gokhale

Pragati Gokhale

Principal Scientific Officer (Management & Systems, Mahatma Gandhi Institute For Rural Industrialization (MGIRI)
Over 35 years of vast experience in various domains including ICT. Since last 7 years fully dedicated to Digital Rural Empowerment. - Won First Prize for best IT innovation for rural entrepreneurs in National conference held by 'SHAKTI' at Pune College of Engineering - Worked as an... Read More →


Tuesday May 17, 2016 16:00 - 16:45
Giraffe 205

16:00

Security and Transparency of Farmers' Savings using ICT
Limited Capacity seats available

Smallholder farmers are willing to save production capital if they are assured of the safety of their savings. The banks are also willing to extend credit to organized farmers if there is evidence of past transactions.
Unfortunately, the available ways of securing members' savings in safe padlocked boxes faces several challenges including breaking of locks and attacks on box keepers. In a bid to safe guard the savings, members keep their transactions in secrecy hoping outsiders will not know how much money they have saved.
This denies the groups a chance to build transaction history with the banks. To address this, Lutheran World Relief (LWR) explored a mobile phone group savings solution that provides a secure way of saving money using the Airtel mobile group wallet while at the same time making the farmers' transactions visible to the Centenary Bank.

We will present LWR’s digitized saving box product and how it parallels the three padlock approach with a three-PIN system and links to a bank account to provide accountability and visibility of both the group as well as individual transactions.


Speakers
avatar for Kenneth Barigye

Kenneth Barigye

Country Director Uganda, Lutheran World Relief
Kenneth Barigye is Lutheran World Relief Country Director for Uganda. He has 13 years of community development experience, seven of which are at the senior level managing community development initiatives in Uganda. Kenneth holds a BA in Development Studies from Makerere University... Read More →



Tuesday May 17, 2016 16:00 - 16:45
Giraffe 206

16:00

SILC PSP Model - Kenya
Limited Capacity seats available

CRS began piloting the PSP model in Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda in August 2008 funded by Bill and Melinda Gates foundation, and by June 2012, the project had organized 378,523 community members into 17,157 SILC groups across the three countries. Kenya had achieved the highest outreach, with 145,568 members organized into 7,337 SILC groups and is enjoying the most success with the PSP model. SILC methodology is becoming popular not only in Kenya but it is a worldwide-accepted methodology, financially liberating many families from poverty in many countries in the world where CRS has projects and with over one million clients.

By the time the SILC Innovations project came to an end in June 2012, CRS felt that there was a need to finalize the PSP business model and develop a toolkit which could be used for scale up in the future. CRS developed a proposal for a one-year grant to FSD Kenya which was funded in September 2012. Using this one-year grant of Kshs 28,531,621 million, CRS finalized the development of the PSP business model to a stage it can be disseminated for roll-out and scale up in Kenya, other countries, and the wider microfinance industry. The project was ultimately extended through January 2014 with an overall budget of Kshs 31,869,686. The project has four thematic areas,e-recording,e-kit development,pro poor targeting and mlinkages.The project is at the final phase of implimenttion having realized close to 18,000 members in 840 Savings groups There are 48 new psps who have been certified and 3 new psp networks.
Out of  close to 840 saving groups ,80% are reporting in the savix.This is after data collected from groups,being keyed in MIS and synced to the savixwebsite @ http://thesavix.org .There is also data collected using android e-recording application and data end up in e-recording portal which can be accessed by CRS and FSD kenya which is funding CRS for e-recording experiment
The e-Recording system is a combination of an android based mobile app and web portal that was designed and developed by Software Group for FSD Kenya to assist them with one of their core initiatives that involves improving the outreach of community based, informal finance in Kenya. The system was built with the savings group methodology in mind, making it useable across a large spectrum of savings groups using this methodology to carry out their group functions. This also makes it useable not only in Kenya but across a wider geographic coverage.
The mobile app is a tool used as a record keeping application, enabling groups perform activities such as defining their own constitution, registering members, defining fines or fees, savings and loan parameters that govern how much a member can save and borrow as well as capturing meeting activities such as member contributions, loan tracking, charging fines and fees and end of cycle share outs. Groups are able to back up their data after every meeting activity with the aim of increasing security of data and enabling group members to have access to a host of reports via a web portal.
With benefits such as speed of data capture, speed of share outs at the end of the cycle and security of information, the uptake of the e-Recording application has rapidly increased and to date has received positive feedback both from groups, facilitating agencies and other stakeholders in the sector. As a result of the success in Kenya, FSD Zambia has introduced the application to the Zambian market and piloted it with 12 savings groups who are actively using the application. Rwanda through World Relief has also implemented e-Recording with the app translated to Kinyarwanda for Rwanda market.
As part of providing better and efficient service deliveries to groups, Software Group has responded to a proposal by FSD Kenya to enhance the e-Recording application. The application changes proposed are as a result of feedback collected from savings groups in Kenya, Rwanda and Zambia as well as feedback from several meetings held with FSD Kenya and other
Most recently the e-recording was upgraded and the groups can also enjoy the following services-
a. The group can receive SMS notifications once the constitution has been amended within an active cycle. The group can also request for their balance by sending a message to a short code USSD.
b. The user interface for the current application has been improved by looking at symbols that resemble real world objects that anyone would recognize during transactions
c. Social fund have been separated from loan fund making it very easy to operate.
The SAVIX is a reporting system that provides transparent and standardized, self-reported data on SG programs worldwide.
For the last 5 years the SAVIX has regularly collected financial and operational data from savings group programs and reports on a current total of about 4.5 million members in about 206,000 savings groups, created by more than 790 projects in 43 countries. It does this by automatically posting real-time project data through the online SAVIX MIS (www.mis.thesavix.org), updated daily.
The aim of the site is to facilitate analysis and improve operational practice, by comparing regional, country, project and trainer performance and reporting on long-term research findings.CRS Kenya program has two projects reporting on the savix and lessons learnt on the process will be used to roll out this real time record keeping system to the rest of all the projects in Kenya using SG SILC methodology

Speakers
avatar for Simon Karoki

Simon Karoki

Senior Micro finance Program officer, Catholic Relief Servces (CRS)
Simon is a community microfinance practitioner; he is currently working with Catholic relief services in Kenya program as a senior Microfinance Program officer in charge of SILC Enhancement project funded by Financial Sector Deepening (FSD Kenya. Most recently Simon worked in CRS... Read More →



Tuesday May 17, 2016 16:00 - 16:45
Giraffe 207

16:45

Powering ICT and Livelihoods for Development in Uganda
Limited Capacity seats available

The Connectivity, Electricity, and Education for Entrepreneurship (CE3) program in Uganda seeks to overcome two technology building blocks in the livelihoods sector: power and connectivity. Solar micro-grid power is provided to ICT labs as well as for productive uses such as small machinery and refrigeration. Internet connectivity is provided for market analysis and research to improve profitability. Computer-based entrepreneurship and ICT training is provided to help micro and small businesses make the best use of the ICT resources at their disposal.

The program is a joint enterprise by global corporations such as Accenture, Lenovo, and SunEdison, the University of Notre Dame, and local stakeholders such as BOSCO Uganda, schools, community centers, and business and government institutions.

The presentation will discuss the lessons from providing electricity, ICT services, and entrepreneurship training to small businesses; challenges in implementation and innovative solutions to those challenges; productive uses of CE3 energy; and the synergy between provision of energy and ICT4D. The presentation will focus especially on new efforts to use and evaluate the effectiveness of ICT connections between local businesses and international mentors.


Speakers
avatar for Joey Rich

Joey Rich

Project Coordinator, BOSCO Uganda
Joey is entrepreneur and software developer with a passion for applying technology to the problems of developing nations. Joey received his Bachelor's degree in Computer Science from the University of Notre Dame in 2012. Joey has several years of software development experience and... Read More →


CE3 ppt pptx

Tuesday May 17, 2016 16:45 - 17:30
Giraffe 208

16:45

Rural Digital Empowerment
Limited Capacity seats available

With the announcement of Digital India Program and with the cheap, handy tools like smartphones ICT has now finally reached the door steps of Rural India. Such untapped section of the population (almost 27% of total population of India) had started realizing the opportunities that were presented by connectivity. There is a need to have a methodical knowledge-sharing system which ensured that users do not loose themselves in the vast jungle of the internet. The Atma (Soul) of Rural India is of course Agriculture, and today many applications like MKisan MyRML are available for Agri. Extension, Rural development

The success story of Digital Platforms created by MGIRI for holistic Rural Empowerment and how we are reaching Stakeholders through our Digital Rural Empowerment Program is shared in this presentation

Speakers
avatar for Pragati Gokhale

Pragati Gokhale

Principal Scientific Officer (Management & Systems, Mahatma Gandhi Institute For Rural Industrialization (MGIRI)
Over 35 years of vast experience in various domains including ICT. Since last 7 years fully dedicated to Digital Rural Empowerment. - Won First Prize for best IT innovation for rural entrepreneurs in National conference held by 'SHAKTI' at Pune College of Engineering - Worked as an... Read More →


Tuesday May 17, 2016 16:45 - 17:30
Giraffe 205

16:45

Security and Transparency of Farmers' Savings using ICT
Limited Capacity seats available

Smallholder farmers are willing to save production capital if they are assured of the safety of their savings. The banks are also willing to extend credit to organized farmers if there is evidence of past transactions.
Unfortunately, the available ways of securing members' savings in safe padlocked boxes faces several challenges including breaking of locks and attacks on box keepers. In a bid to safe guard the savings, members keep their transactions in secrecy hoping outsiders will not know how much money they have saved.
This denies the groups a chance to build transaction history with the banks. To address this, Lutheran World Relief (LWR) explored a mobile phone group savings solution that provides a secure way of saving money using the Airtel mobile group wallet while at the same time making the farmers' transactions visible to the Centenary Bank.

We will present LWR’s digitized saving box product and how it parallels the three padlock approach with a three-PIN system and links to a bank account to provide accountability and visibility of both the group as well as individual transactions.


Speakers
avatar for Kenneth Barigye

Kenneth Barigye

Country Director Uganda, Lutheran World Relief
Kenneth Barigye is Lutheran World Relief Country Director for Uganda. He has 13 years of community development experience, seven of which are at the senior level managing community development initiatives in Uganda. Kenneth holds a BA in Development Studies from Makerere University... Read More →



Tuesday May 17, 2016 16:45 - 17:30
Giraffe 206

16:45

SILC PSP Model - Kenya
Limited Capacity seats available

CRS began piloting the PSP model in Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda in August 2008 funded by Bill and Melinda Gates foundation, and by June 2012, the project had organized 378,523 community members into 17,157 SILC groups across the three countries. Kenya had achieved the highest outreach, with 145,568 members organized into 7,337 SILC groups and is enjoying the most success with the PSP model. SILC methodology is becoming popular not only in Kenya but it is a worldwide-accepted methodology, financially liberating many families from poverty in many countries in the world where CRS has projects and with over one million clients.

By the time the SILC Innovations project came to an end in June 2012, CRS felt that there was a need to finalize the PSP business model and develop a toolkit which could be used for scale up in the future. CRS developed a proposal for a one-year grant to FSD Kenya which was funded in September 2012. Using this one-year grant of Kshs 28,531,621 million, CRS finalized the development of the PSP business model to a stage it can be disseminated for roll-out and scale up in Kenya, other countries, and the wider microfinance industry. The project was ultimately extended through January 2014 with an overall budget of Kshs 31,869,686. The project has four thematic areas,e-recording,e-kit development,pro poor targeting and mlinkages.The project is at the final phase of implimenttion having realized close to 18,000 members in 840 Savings groups There are 48 new psps who have been certified and 3 new psp networks.
Of the of the close to 840 saving groups ,80% are reporting in the savix.This is after data collected from groups,being keyed in MIS and synced to the savixwebsite @ http://thesavix.org .There is also data collected using android e-recording application and data end up in e-recording portal which can be accessed by CRS and FSD kenya which is funding CRS for e-recording experiment
The e-Recording system is a combination of an android based mobile app and web portal that was designed and developed by Software Group for FSD Kenya to assist them with one of their core initiatives that involves improving the outreach of community based, informal finance in Kenya. The system was built with the savings group methodology in mind, making it useable across a large spectrum of savings groups using this methodology to carry out their group functions. This also makes it useable not only in Kenya but across a wider geographic coverage.
The mobile app is a tool used as a record keeping application, enabling groups perform activities such as defining their own constitution, registering members, defining fines or fees, savings and loan parameters that govern how much a member can save and borrow as well as capturing meeting activities such as member contributions, loan tracking, charging fines and fees and end of cycle share outs. Groups are able to back up their data after every meeting activity with the aim of increasing security of data and enabling group members to have access to a host of reports via a web portal.
With benefits such as speed of data capture, speed of share outs at the end of the cycle and security of information, the uptake of the e-Recording application has rapidly increased and to date has received positive feedback both from groups, facilitating agencies and other stakeholders in the sector. As a result of the success in Kenya, FSD Zambia has introduced the application to the Zambian market and piloted it with 12 savings groups who are actively using the application. Rwanda through World Relief has also implemented e-Recording with the app translated to Kinyarwanda for Rwanda market.
As part of providing better and efficient service deliveries to groups, Software Group has responded to a proposal by FSD Kenya to enhance the e-Recording application. The application changes proposed are as a result of feedback collected from savings groups in Kenya, Rwanda and Zambia as well as feedback from several meetings held with FSD Kenya and other
Most recently the e-recording was upgraded and the groups can also enjoy the following services-
a. The group can receive SMS notifications once the constitution has been amended within an active cycle. The group can also request for their balance by sending a message to a short code USSD.
b. The user interface for the current application has been improved by looking at symbols that resemble real world objects that anyone would recognize during transactions
c. Social fund have been separated from loan fund making it very easy to operate.
The SAVIX is a reporting system that provides transparent and standardized, self-reported data on SG programs worldwide.
For the last 5 years the SAVIX has regularly collected financial and operational data from savings group programs and reports on a current total of about 4.5 million members in about 206,000 savings groups, created by more than 790 projects in 43 countries. It does this by automatically posting real-time project data through the online SAVIX MIS (www.mis.thesavix.org), updated daily.
The aim of the site is to facilitate analysis and improve operational practice, by comparing regional, country, project and trainer performance and reporting on long-term research findings.CRS Kenya program has two projects reporting on the savix and lessons learnt on the process will be used to roll out this real time record keeping system to the rest of all the projects in Kenya using SG SILC methodology

Speakers
avatar for Simon Karoki

Simon Karoki

Senior Micro finance Program officer, Catholic Relief Servces (CRS)
Simon is a community microfinance practitioner; he is currently working with Catholic relief services in Kenya program as a senior Microfinance Program officer in charge of SILC Enhancement project funded by Financial Sector Deepening (FSD Kenya. Most recently Simon worked in CRS... Read More →


Tuesday May 17, 2016 16:45 - 17:30
Giraffe 207
 
Wednesday, May 18
 

10:45

Mobile Banking and Financial Inclusion at National Scale in Tanzania
Limited Capacity filling up

Tanzania is a country of 42 million with a per capita GDP of roughly $1.47 per person per day. Seventy-five percent of the population resides in rural areas; 80% are focused on agriculture. In Microfinance, the low average loan size and expansive geographical footprint with low population concentrations result in proportionately high administrative costs. In an effort to impact and provide financial services to more people (both savings and lending clients), in a financially sustainable manner, a microfinance institution (MFI) must reduce costs and streamline operations. 

In 2014, Vision Fund Tanzania (VFT) launched a mobile payment platform that has streamlined operations and provides financial services in otherwise unbanked locations at a reduced cost both to the customer and VFT. This initiative has driven down administrative costs, allowing VFT to effectively target financially unreached groups in rural communities. It has also provided critical business information to the organization; therefore improving and increasing the impact of its efforts. In addition, VFT provides training to clients in the areas of financial literacy and business basics; this has increased the uptake of formal financial products by rural communities.

Overall, the customer experience has been greatly improved. This means no day-long travel to town in unscheduled buses and boda bodas. No more queuing in bank halls in any part of Tanzania, no more standing in long, slow queues and no more loss of daily earnings to VFT customers due to closed businesses. VFT has made financial transactions easy from anywhere in Tanzania at any time. It allows VFT customers in Tanzania to access the information in their accounts without having to leave the comfort of their business or homes, freeing up precious time that can be instead allocated to other economic or family activities.

Speakers
RR

Rose Ringeera

Role Regional Project Manager, Vision Fund International
Rose oversees multiple projects in the East Africa Region that cover five Microfinance Institutions. She is responsible for leading and delivering Information Technology software projects that enhance the efficiency and effectiveness of different functions within the VFI Partnership... Read More →


Wednesday May 18, 2016 10:45 - 11:50
Jambo Conference Centre D

10:45

Money + Messaging: Benefits and Barriers
Limited Capacity seats available

Much has been made of the benefits and achievements of mobile money ventures in developing countries. There are huge benefits to larger organizations and citizens in time savings and effort to send and receive money, pay bills and generally have a more efficient cashless process in many areas.

However we have found in many of our projects that these options are simply not that accessible to smaller and even medium sized projects. There are still huge gains to be made in areas such as local savings communities, co-operative funding schemes and more basic areas such as being able to reward or thank users for their contributions.

FrontlineSMS, along with SIMLab, have been running projects and pilots for years in Kenya gathering practical knowledge about the technology and how it can be utilized in the ICT4D world. This presentation/training session/workshop will highlight those learnings and achievements and provide a discussion area for input from the attendees. FrontlineSMS's experience with mobile money automation and workflows is primarily from Kenya, but the ability for the projects and tools to be rolled out across our next 10 countries will also be shared.

Training and a demonstration of FrontlineSMS's in-beta Payments app will also be given.


Speakers
avatar for Alex Pitkin

Alex Pitkin

CTO + Projects, FrontlineSMS
Alex Pitkin joined the FrontlineSMS production team in Nairobi in January 2013 as the CTO. Alex runs all areas of the production team including product development, technical design and client-side consulting helping users new and old implement projects using the Frontline suite of... Read More →


Wednesday May 18, 2016 10:45 - 11:50
Jambo Conference Centre C

11:50

Mobile Banking and Financial Inclusion at National Scale in Tanzania
Limited Capacity seats available

Tanzania is a country of 42 million with a per capita GDP of roughly $1.47 per person per day. Seventy-five percent of the population resides in rural areas; 80% are focused on agriculture. In Microfinance, the low average loan size and expansive geographical footprint with low population concentrations result in proportionately high administrative costs. In an effort to impact and provide financial services to more people (both savings and lending clients), in a financially sustainable manner, a microfinance institution (MFI) must reduce costs and streamline operations.

In 2014, Vision Fund Tanzania (VFT) launched a mobile payment platform that has streamlined operations and provides financial services in otherwise unbanked locations at a reduced cost both to the customer and VFT. This initiative has driven down administrative costs, allowing VFT to effectively target financially unreached groups in rural communities. It has also provided critical business information to the organization; therefore improving and increasing the impact of its efforts. In addition, VFT provides training to clients in the areas of financial literacy and business basics; this has increased the uptake of formal financial products by rural communities.

Overall, the customer experience has been greatly improved. This means no day-long travel to town in unscheduled buses and boda bodas. No more queuing in bank halls in any part of Tanzania, no more standing in long, slow queues and no more loss of daily earnings to VFT customers due to closed businesses. VFT has made financial transactions easy from anywhere in Tanzania at any time. It allows VFT customers in Tanzania to access the information in their accounts without having to leave the comfort of their business or homes, freeing up precious time that can be instead allocated to other economic or family activities.

Speakers
RR

Rose Ringeera

Role Regional Project Manager, Vision Fund International
Rose oversees multiple projects in the East Africa Region that cover five Microfinance Institutions. She is responsible for leading and delivering Information Technology software projects that enhance the efficiency and effectiveness of different functions within the VFI Partnership... Read More →


Wednesday May 18, 2016 11:50 - 12:50
Jambo Conference Centre D

11:50

Money + Messaging: Benefits and Barriers
Limited Capacity seats available

Much has been made of the benefits and achievements of mobile money ventures in developing countries. There are huge benefits to larger organizations and citizens in time savings and effort to send and receive money, pay bills and generally have a more efficient cashless process in many areas.

However we have found in many of our projects that these options are simply not that accessible to smaller and even medium sized projects. There are still huge gains to be made in areas such as local savings communities, co-operative funding schemes and more basic areas such as being able to reward or thank users for their contributions.

FrontlineSMS, along with SIMLab, have been running projects and pilots for years in Kenya gathering practical knowledge about the technology and how it can be utilized in the ICT4D world. This presentation/training session/workshop will highlight those learnings and achievements and provide a discussion area for input from the attendees. FrontlineSMS's experience with mobile money automation and workflows is primarily from Kenya, but the ability for the projects and tools to be rolled out across our next 10 countries will also be shared.

Training and a demonstration of FrontlineSMS's in-beta Payments app will also be given


Speakers
avatar for Alex Pitkin

Alex Pitkin

CTO + Projects, FrontlineSMS
Alex Pitkin joined the FrontlineSMS production team in Nairobi in January 2013 as the CTO. Alex runs all areas of the production team including product development, technical design and client-side consulting helping users new and old implement projects using the Frontline suite of... Read More →


Wednesday May 18, 2016 11:50 - 12:50
Jambo Conference Centre C

13:50

Conducting Alpha Testing to Design a Learning Product
Limited Capacity seats available

Human capacity is a critical component of delivering financial services yet many financial institutions, particularly those targeting the poor in developing countries, consistently struggle to develop and manage their human capital. This is important as an estimated 2 billion working-age adults - more than half of the world's total adult population - do not have an account at a formal financial institution.

In response to the opportunity to look at new applications of technology to catalyze change in the field of financial inclusion, CGAP has been funded to work on a new project called The Gateway Academy, an innovative learning project that will offer both on-line and blended courses and cultivate communities of practice focused on financial inclusion in sub-Saharan Africa. Gateway Academy will work with training providers, financial service providers, and e-learning experts to generate high quality course content, build communities of practice, and conduct on-going research to understand user needs.

From February 2016 to (at least) August 2016, the Gateway Academy team will create 5-7 Alpha Learning Circles (ALC) where we will develop, implement, and learn from various testing cycles. We seek to present at the ICT4D Conference our project design and learnings to date from our ALCs that will be underway. Our presentation will highlight our monitoring, evaluation, and learning framework and how our approach in using alpha testing is allowing us to stay innovative, respond to user needs, and adjust to the challenging markets in which we'll operate.

Speakers
avatar for Thom Sinclair

Thom Sinclair

Gateway Academy Team Lead, CGAP
Thom Sinclair is a Senior Operations Officer at CGAP where he leads the Gateway Academy, a MasterCard Foundation initiative to build capacity for inclusive financial service providers. Previously he was a Senior Knowledge Management Advisor with USAID where he led the design and implementation... Read More →



Wednesday May 18, 2016 13:50 - 14:55
Jambo Conference Centre D

13:50

How Can Mass Market Digital Finance Innovations Be Used for Targeted Development Purposes?
Limited Capacity seats available

A number of digital finance platforms are gaining traction in the Eastern Africa market that could serve many consumer segments. The motivations of the entrepreneurs behind these innovations are mixed, but include the desire to make a difference in the livelihoods and social networks of lower income people. The purpose of this discussion will be to show two technology innovators in digital savings/fundraising and asset financing and then discuss possible use cases for this technology. Presenters will include two companies that are gaining traction in Kenya. M-Changa, is a new "purpose neutral" fund-raising platform that low-to-moderate income Kenyans are using to raise funding for all kinds of purposes, e.g. weddings and funerals, using mobile money to pay and collect funds, but can it be harnessed for leveraging social networks for medical emergencies, for example, faced by small holder farmers? A second data analytics company called Lendable supports companies that are selling and financing productive assets, such as solar power units. In addition to offering alternative wholesale financing, it also features software that enables both Lendable and its borrower/servicer to see the quality of the loan portfolio real-time.

Moderators
avatar for James Hokans

James Hokans

Director of Strategic Learning, Mercy Corps, AgriFin Accelerate Program
James Hokans is the Director of Strategic Learning in Mercy Corps' AgriFin Accelerate Program (www.mercycorpsafa.com). Mr. Hokans is a senior global thought leader in transformational digital finance and interoperability. Before joining Mercy Corps, Mr. Hokans was a practice director... Read More →

Speakers
DG

Daniel Goldfarb

CEO, Lendable
Prior to founding Lendable, Daniel was partner at Greenstart, a seed stage venture capital firm in San Francisco, where his investment focus was on the intersection of data, finance, and energy. Before Greenstart he was the program director at Americans for Energy Leadership, where... Read More →
KM

Kyai Mullei

CEO, M-Changa
Kyai Mullei is an IT and Social Entrepreneur with over 7 years’ experience leading information system design. Through his consultancy firm InfoSystem Solutions Limited – he primarily focused on the design and implementation of hybrid software solutions for small to medium sized... Read More →


Wednesday May 18, 2016 13:50 - 14:55
Jambo Conference Centre C

14:55

MerchantPro: An Electronic Voucher Platform for Remote Context
Limited Capacity seats available

In areas with significant access challenges, the use of Cash Transfer Programming (CTP) has great potential to help provide appropriate support to the most vulnerable people. However, as with in-kind programming, the risks linked to cash modalities are heightened when handled remotely.
The objective of this presentation is twofold: It will help highlight key challenges associated with the use of CTP in remote areas with little or no Telecom Network coverage. In the second part, the authors will present a live demo of an electronic Voucher platform adapted for remote context.

Speakers
avatar for Jeffrey N. Carre

Jeffrey N. Carre

CTO, Transversal
Jeffrey N. Carre  is a civil engineer, web developer, IT trainer and network administrator. He joined the consortium FRDDH/FDS (Fondation Reseau de Developpement Durable d'Haiti / Faculte des Sciences de l'Universite d'Etat d'Haiti) in 2009. Until November 2011 he was a technical... Read More →



Wednesday May 18, 2016 14:55 - 16:00
Jambo Conference Centre C

14:55

Office Hours: How to Reach More Women for Real ICT4Dimpact
Limited Capacity seats available

ICT4D efforts have an 80% failure rate. Make this failure rate history by targeting the real change agents in a community - women and marginalized groups who do not often get to take advantage of ICT access and use - certainly not often once we leave the community. Development can only occur to the degree that the least empowered people are positively affected: women migrate less, manage the family and the land, and are often purposely discouraged from "developing" as it threatens the status quo that wishes to protect the more powerful. Come and bring your ICT4D interventions to my office hours, and we can discuss actionable strategies to encourage power-sharing between men and women, ways to uniquely reach and train women on ICT, and other methods for making your ICTD effort succeed and buck the failure trend by being strategically inclusive.

Speakers
avatar for Revi Sterling

Revi Sterling

Deputy Chief of Party, NetHope
Dr. Revi Sterling is Deputy Chief of Party for the USAID-GBI alliance at NetHope. She manages the Women and the Web Alliance - a multi-partner effort in Kenya and Nigeria - as part of her portfolio of ICTD applications for GBI. Prior to NetHope, Revi started and directed the first... Read More →


Wednesday May 18, 2016 14:55 - 16:00
Jambo Conference Centre D

16:30

Online Freelancing as a Contributor to Job Creation
Limited Capacity filling up

There's no doubt the Internet has revolutionized and changed the way people work. Marketplaces for individual freelancers and freelance projects are an example of the many new business models on the web. Online marketplaces such as www.freelancer.com, www.upwork.com, and others offer freelancers a platform to obtain a client base that's not limited by any boundaries. 

In conflict areas such as Gaza Strip/Palestine, creating sustainable employment opportunities, especially for educated youth is extremely difficult. Unemployment in Gaza is estimated to be among the highest in the world at 43%. For youth (15-29 years old) in Gaza, unemployment is over 60%. 

 Approximately 4 years ago, Mercy Corps recognized the potential of virtual employment or freelancing as an innovative way to overcome the challenges and connect youth in Gaza with employment opportunities.  Through an iterative process Mercy Corps has built a program that combined building awareness with provision of the skills and knowledge needed to compete on the international level for freelancing jobs. The lessons learned from each step have informed the development of the next stage of the program.

Mercy Corps' staff ran a survey in 2015 to help quantify the results. 54 freelancers reported that they had earned more than 62,000 US Dollars from 695 freelance jobs just during their engagement in the program. Moreover, those 54 influenced around 160 people to start freelancing, managing to earn more than 28,000 USD.  All of them said that they will continue freelancing after the end of the project, and all said that the project positively affected their future professional lives. Freelancers also mentioned other impacts from the program such as creating self-trust, developing relationships, and the exposure to other cultures. Freelancers after having completed jobs for people around the world including United States, Russia, and China.

Speakers
avatar for Taysir Shaqalaih

Taysir Shaqalaih

Program Manager, Mercy Corps
Taysir Shaqalaih holds a master degree in Engineering from Cambridge University-UK. He brings14+ years of diversified experience working in project management/development, youth employment, ICT development projects, entrepreneurship, academia, and both electrical power production... Read More →



Wednesday May 18, 2016 16:30 - 17:30
Jambo Conference Centre C

16:30

Segovia for Bulk Payments
Limited Capacity seats available

This session will demonstrate how Segovia has been used to facilitate beneficiary registration, bulk payment scheduling and management, and monitoring/evaluation and reporting, all through the same cloud based system. Special focus will be on flexible configurations across functions within a program, security of data and processes, and integration with multiple payment providers through Segovia's payment gateway.

Speakers
avatar for Dr. Satwik Seshasai

Dr. Satwik Seshasai

Chief Technology Officer, Segovia
Satwik is founding Chief Technology Officer of Segovia, where he has led development of a payment technology platform for NGOs to scale cash transfer programs globally in partnership with major donors (USAID, DFID, ECHO, BMGF) and every major mobile network operator in sub-Saharan... Read More →


Wednesday May 18, 2016 16:30 - 17:30
Jambo Conference Centre D
 
Thursday, May 19
 

10:45

Efficacy of Cash Programming
Limited Capacity seats available

This talk will discuss the efficacy of cash transfer programming including examples where it has performed well and where it has not. We will discuss the opportunities for and results from experimental testing which have explored key questions such as whether the poor spend money wisely, and whether there are long-term impacts of cash. Finally, we will explore ways in which core technology systems, a focus on data management and security, and user experience design can all be leveraged to achieve the most optimal outcomes in cash transfer programming.

Speakers
avatar for Dr. Satwik Seshasai

Dr. Satwik Seshasai

Chief Technology Officer, Segovia
Satwik is founding Chief Technology Officer of Segovia, where he has led development of a payment technology platform for NGOs to scale cash transfer programs globally in partnership with major donors (USAID, DFID, ECHO, BMGF) and every major mobile network operator in sub-Saharan... Read More →


Thursday May 19, 2016 10:45 - 11:30
Giraffe 210

10:45

Global Mentoring Platform: Democratizing Access to Social Capital for Entrepreneurs
Limited Capacity seats available

MicroMentor is a global online community that leverages the power of mentoring to help entrepreneurs thrive with help from volunteer business mentors. It's a social enterprise incubating within Mercy Corps, a leading global organization powered by the belief that a better world is possible. Conceived in the FIELD program at the Aspen Institute, it was a solution aimed at democratizing access to social capital, the lack of which was identified as a significant cause for entrepreneurs' inability to succeed. In the U.S. (2014) MicroMentor added 2,100 jobs and $14 million in increased revenues. There are over 15,000 active mentor-mentee matches globally who are tackling the rising pressure for both local and global economies to grow and diversify to absorb the next generation of professionals into the labor market. Our model is rooted in providing decent work and economic growth opportunities for those most unlikely to access social capital - low-income, women, immigrant communities, and outside urban hubs. We believe in scaling access to mentoring and critical business know-how by leveraging partnerships - public, private and civil society. The discussion will present one such partnership with our corporate partner HPE who run their skills based employee volunteering program on their instance of this technology - HPE Advisors portal powered by MicroMentor. Hundreds of HPE employees are supporting non-profits, social entrepreneurs and small businesses around 90 countries. We want to share our story of how working together with partners, technology can help entrepreneurs and small businesses thrive.

Speakers
avatar for Anita Ramachandran

Anita Ramachandran

Director, MicroMentor, Mercy Corps
Anita Ramachandran is the Director of MicroMentor at Mercy Corps. She drives MicroMentor's global development efforts and cultivates partnerships with organizations interested in establishing and growing an employee engagement solution or mentoring program. She is passionate about... Read More →



Thursday May 19, 2016 10:45 - 11:30
Giraffe 208

10:45

Kenya's Single Registry: A Tool for Social Protection Planning, Coordination and Monitoring
Limited Capacity seats available

The launch of Kenya’s Single Registry scheme marks a major step forward in the management and monitoring of social protection in low and middle-income countries. The Registry has enabled the government of Kenya to link together the Management Information Systems (MISs) of five social security schemes (the Old Age Grant, Disability Benefit, Orphans and Vulnerable Children’s Cash Transfer, Hunger Safety Net programme, and World Food Programme’s (WFP) Cash for Assets scheme). Furthermore, the Single Registry is linked to the National Registration database, so that programme beneficiaries can be clearly identified by their national ID number.

The Single Registry now enables the National Social Protection Secretariat – based in the Ministry of Labour and East African Affairs – to access information on all households receiving social security.  This enables them to monitor: beneficiaries enrolled against the government’s expansion plan for the national social security system, the number and type of programme each household is benefitting from, the accuracy of beneficiary details, timelines of payments, complaints resolved within established time frames, and consolidated programme costs. Importantly, the Single Registry can capture information on schemes that are designed very differently, including the use of distinct targeting mechanisms.

The development of the Single Registry is a core component of the WFP’s Complementarity Initiative in Kenya Over the past five years, Development Pathways has been contracted by, initially, DFID and subsequently, WFP to work with the National Social Protection Secretariat to build the Single Registry. It has involved:

  • Upgrading four of the individual programme-level MISs to robust and scalable web-enabled infrastructure and platforms;
  • Enabling the individual MISs to share innovative common services;
  • Building an automated electronic validation and query service between the Single Registry and the Integrated Population Registration Service (which contains details on 30 million individuals);  
  • Configuring the automatic replication of data between programme level MISs and the Single Registry;
  • Establishing innovative data visualization tools to engage stakeholders through illustrative dashboards; and,
  • Developing a geo-spatial mapping interface and a query based reporting framework.


Kenya’s Single Registry is very different in design when compared to earlier attempts in other countries to develop unified databases. Kenya’s system is essentially a warehouse, holding information on all the beneficiaries of the national social protection system, and is continuously updated as individual programme MISs update their information on beneficiaries. For example, it enables the Social Protection Secretariat to know when households have entered or exited schemes, how much people they have been paid each month, whether there are complaints about the system and, potentially, update any changes in household composition. However, the information produced depends on the quality of the data entered.  The next stage in the development of the Single Registry will be to ensure that all programme MISs can be managed at district level – through a web-based system – and that information on beneficiaries can be updated as close to real time as possible. The broader plan is to also bring on board other components of the social protection system such as the National Social Health Insurance scheme and the National Social Security Fund (NSSF). 


Speakers
avatar for Richard Chirchir

Richard Chirchir

Senior Management Information System Specialist, Development Pathways
Richard Chirchir is the Senior MIS Specialist at Development Pathways and an experienced Management Information Systems (MIS) expert with over 14 years of relevant professional experience. He has devoted most of his career to the design and development of multi-platform ICT solutions... Read More →



Thursday May 19, 2016 10:45 - 11:30
Giraffe 209

11:30

Efficacy of Cash Programming
Limited Capacity seats available

This talk will discuss the efficacy of cash transfer programming including examples where it has performed well and where it has not. We will discuss the opportunities for and results from experimental testing which have explored key questions such as whether the poor spend money wisely, and whether there are long-term impacts of cash. Finally, we will explore ways in which core technology systems, a focus on data management and security, and user experience design can all be leveraged to achieve the most optimal outcomes in cash transfer programming.

Speakers
avatar for Dr. Satwik Seshasai

Dr. Satwik Seshasai

Chief Technology Officer, Segovia
Satwik is founding Chief Technology Officer of Segovia, where he has led development of a payment technology platform for NGOs to scale cash transfer programs globally in partnership with major donors (USAID, DFID, ECHO, BMGF) and every major mobile network operator in sub-Saharan... Read More →


Thursday May 19, 2016 11:30 - 12:15
Giraffe 210

11:30

Kenya's Single Registry: A Tool for Social Protection Planning, Coordination and Monitoring
Limited Capacity seats available

The launch of Kenya’s Single Registry scheme marks a major step forward in the management and monitoring of social protection in low and middle-income countries. The Registry has enabled the government of Kenya to link together the Management Information Systems (MISs) of five social security schemes (the Old Age Grant, Disability Benefit, Orphans and Vulnerable Children’s Cash Transfer, Hunger Safety Net programme, and World Food Programme’s (WFP) Cash for Assets scheme). Furthermore, the Single Registry is linked to the National Registration database, so that programme beneficiaries can be clearly identified by their national ID number.

The Single Registry now enables the National Social Protection Secretariat – based in the Ministry of Labour and East African Affairs – to access information on all households receiving social security.  This enables them to monitor: beneficiaries enrolled against the government’s expansion plan for the national social security system, the number and type of programme each household is benefitting from, the accuracy of beneficiary details, timelines of payments, complaints resolved within established time frames, and consolidated programme costs. Importantly, the Single Registry can capture information on schemes that are designed very differently, including the use of distinct targeting mechanisms.

The development of the Single Registry is a core component of the WFP’s Complementarity Initiative in Kenya Over the past five years, Development Pathways has been contracted by, initially, DFID and subsequently, WFP to work with the National Social Protection Secretariat to build the Single Registry. It has involved:

  • Upgrading four of the individual programme-level MISs to robust and scalable web-enabled infrastructure and platforms;
  • Enabling the individual MISs to share innovative common services;
  • Building an automated electronic validation and query service between the Single Registry and the Integrated Population Registration Service (which contains details on 30 million individuals);  
  • Configuring the automatic replication of data between programme level MISs and the Single Registry;
  • Establishing innovative data visualization tools to engage stakeholders through illustrative dashboards; and,
  • Developing a geo-spatial mapping interface and a query based reporting framework.


Kenya’s Single Registry is very different in design when compared to earlier attempts in other countries to develop unified databases. Kenya’s system is essentially a warehouse, holding information on all the beneficiaries of the national social protection system, and is continuously updated as individual programme MISs update their information on beneficiaries. For example, it enables the Social Protection Secretariat to know when households have entered or exited schemes, how much people they have been paid each month, whether there are complaints about the system and, potentially, update any changes in household composition. However, the information produced depends on the quality of the data entered.  The next stage in the development of the Single Registry will be to ensure that all programme MISs can be managed at district level – through a web-based system – and that information on beneficiaries can be updated as close to real time as possible. The broader plan is to also bring on board other components of the social protection system such as the National Social Health Insurance scheme and the National Social Security Fund (NSSF). 


Speakers
avatar for Richard Chirchir

Richard Chirchir

Senior Management Information System Specialist, Development Pathways
Richard Chirchir is the Senior MIS Specialist at Development Pathways and an experienced Management Information Systems (MIS) expert with over 14 years of relevant professional experience. He has devoted most of his career to the design and development of multi-platform ICT solutions... Read More →



Thursday May 19, 2016 11:30 - 12:15
Giraffe 209

11:30

When Digital Services Need a Human Touch (1.5 Hours)
Limited Capacity seats available

The Mercy Corps AgriFin Mobile program partners with private sector partners in Indonesia, Zimbabwe and Uganda. Working with the private sector, the program intends to demonstrate that it is possible to provide sustainable, cost effective digital financial and rural advisory services to smallholder farmers.

The program has been operating since 2012 and one of the key learnings from the first three years of the program, is the importance of human interaction when introducing digital services and products. AgrFin Mobile has taken different approaches in each country it operates; in Indonesia it has partnered with the banking sector, in Uganda it has worked with third party service providers, and in Zimbabwe it has partnered with the leading MNO, Econet.

While the environment for reaching smallholder farmers has varied in each country and with each business model, one thing that has been consistent is the need for people spending the time and energy to introduce digital products and services to smallholder farmers.

Moderators
TW

Trey Waters

AgriFin Mobile Program Director, Mercy Corps
Trey Waters of Mercy Corps - Director of the AgriFin Mobile Program and panel facilitator

Speakers
avatar for Andi Ikhwan

Andi Ikhwan

Agriculture and Financial Services Program Director, Mercy Corps Indonesia
Andi Ikhwan is the Agriculture and Financial Services Program Director at Mercy Corps Indonesia. Andi is an access-to-finance expert with 16 years’ experience supporting the financial services sector and diverse stakeholders in Indonesia. Joining Mercy Corps Indonesia in mid-2008... Read More →
GM

Godwin Mashiri

General Manager, Econet
Having studied and specialized in insurance, Godwin has experience working in short-term insurance, medical and life assurance and microinsurance. Godwin has been instrumental in the development and rollout of multiple microinsurance and financial inclusion products throughout Zimbabwe... Read More →
avatar for Jenny Rafanomenzana

Jenny Rafanomenzana

CEO, TruTrade
VAS


Thursday May 19, 2016 11:30 - 13:00
Giraffe 208

12:15

Efficacy of Cash Programming
Limited Capacity seats available

This talk will discuss the efficacy of cash transfer programming including examples where it has performed well and where it has not. We will discuss the opportunities for and results from experimental testing which have explored key questions such as whether the poor spend money wisely, and whether there are long-term impacts of cash. Finally, we will explore ways in which core technology systems, a focus on data management and security, and user experience design can all be leveraged to achieve the most optimal outcomes in cash transfer programming.

Speakers
avatar for Dr. Satwik Seshasai

Dr. Satwik Seshasai

Chief Technology Officer, Segovia
Satwik is founding Chief Technology Officer of Segovia, where he has led development of a payment technology platform for NGOs to scale cash transfer programs globally in partnership with major donors (USAID, DFID, ECHO, BMGF) and every major mobile network operator in sub-Saharan... Read More →


Thursday May 19, 2016 12:15 - 13:00
Giraffe 210

12:15

Kenya's Single Registry: A Tool for Social Protection Planning, Coordination and Monitoring
Limited Capacity seats available

The launch of Kenya’s Single Registry scheme marks a major step forward in the management and monitoring of social protection in low and middle-income countries. The Registry has enabled the government of Kenya to link together the Management Information Systems (MISs) of five social security schemes (the Old Age Grant, Disability Benefit, Orphans and Vulnerable Children’s Cash Transfer, Hunger Safety Net programme, and World Food Programme’s (WFP) Cash for Assets scheme). Furthermore, the Single Registry is linked to the National Registration database, so that programme beneficiaries can be clearly identified by their national ID number.

The Single Registry now enables the National Social Protection Secretariat – based in the Ministry of Labour and East African Affairs – to access information on all households receiving social security.  This enables them to monitor: beneficiaries enrolled against the government’s expansion plan for the national social security system, the number and type of programme each household is benefitting from, the accuracy of beneficiary details, timelines of payments, complaints resolved within established time frames, and consolidated programme costs. Importantly, the Single Registry can capture information on schemes that are designed very differently, including the use of distinct targeting mechanisms.

The development of the Single Registry is a core component of the WFP’s Complementarity Initiative in Kenya Over the past five years, Development Pathways has been contracted by, initially, DFID and subsequently, WFP to work with the National Social Protection Secretariat to build the Single Registry. It has involved:

  • Upgrading four of the individual programme-level MISs to robust and scalable web-enabled infrastructure and platforms;
  • Enabling the individual MISs to share innovative common services;
  • Building an automated electronic validation and query service between the Single Registry and the Integrated Population Registration Service (which contains details on 30 million individuals);  
  • Configuring the automatic replication of data between programme level MISs and the Single Registry;
  • Establishing innovative data visualization tools to engage stakeholders through illustrative dashboards; and,
  • Developing a geo-spatial mapping interface and a query based reporting framework.


Kenya’s Single Registry is very different in design when compared to earlier attempts in other countries to develop unified databases. Kenya’s system is essentially a warehouse, holding information on all the beneficiaries of the national social protection system, and is continuously updated as individual programme MISs update their information on beneficiaries. For example, it enables the Social Protection Secretariat to know when households have entered or exited schemes, how much people they have been paid each month, whether there are complaints about the system and, potentially, update any changes in household composition. However, the information produced depends on the quality of the data entered.  The next stage in the development of the Single Registry will be to ensure that all programme MISs can be managed at district level – through a web-based system – and that information on beneficiaries can be updated as close to real time as possible. The broader plan is to also bring on board other components of the social protection system such as the National Social Health Insurance scheme and the National Social Security Fund (NSSF). 


Speakers
avatar for Richard Chirchir

Richard Chirchir

Senior Management Information System Specialist, Development Pathways
Richard Chirchir is the Senior MIS Specialist at Development Pathways and an experienced Management Information Systems (MIS) expert with over 14 years of relevant professional experience. He has devoted most of his career to the design and development of multi-platform ICT solutions... Read More →



Thursday May 19, 2016 12:15 - 13:00
Giraffe 209

14:00

Global Mentoring Platform: Democratizing Access to Social Capital for Entrepreneurs
Limited Capacity seats available

MicroMentor is a global online community that leverages the power of mentoring to help entrepreneurs thrive with the help from volunteer business mentors. It's a social enterprise incubating within Mercy Corps, a leading global organization powered by the belief that a better world is possible. Conceived in the FIELD program at the Aspen Institute, it was a solution aimed at democratizing access to social capital, the lack of which was identified as a significant cause for entrepreneurs' inability to succeed. In the U.S. (2014) MicroMentor added 2,100 jobs and $14 million in increased revenues. Startups using MicroMentor are increasing their survival rate by 25%. There are over 15,000 active mentor-mentee matches globally who are tackling the rising pressure for both local and global economies to grow and diversify to absorb the next generation of professionals into the labor market. Our model is rooted in providing decent work and economic growth opportunities for those most unlikely to access social capital - low-income, women, immigrant communities, and outside urban hubs. We believe in scaling access to mentoring and critical business know-how by leveraging partnerships - public, private and civil society. The discussion will present one such partnership with our corporate partner HPE who run their skills based employee engagement program on their instance of this technology - HPE Advisors portal powered by MicroMentor. Hundreds of HPE employees are supporting non-profits, social entrepreneurs and small businesses around 90 countries. We want to share our story of how working together with partners, technology can help entrepreneurs and small businesses thrive.

Speakers
avatar for Anita Ramachandran

Anita Ramachandran

Director, MicroMentor, Mercy Corps
Anita Ramachandran is the Director of MicroMentor at Mercy Corps. She drives MicroMentor's global development efforts and cultivates partnerships with organizations interested in establishing and growing an employee engagement solution or mentoring program. She is passionate about... Read More →



Thursday May 19, 2016 14:00 - 14:45
Giraffe 210

14:00

Microsoft's Approach to Incorporating the SDGs into Our Business Models
Limited Capacity full

With the announcement of the new Sustainable Development Goals by the United Nations, Microsoft has taken the path of incorporating SDGs from the top down into their business, services and approach. While our efforts are still in the early stages, learn about some of the thought processes, approaches and plans to grow towards a global organization making societal impact and empowering more people across the globe to do more.


Speakers
avatar for Kate Krukiel

Kate Krukiel

Director of Strategic Partnerships, Microsoft
Kate Krukiel joined Microsoft in 2006 and is currently the Technology Advisor for Partnerships for the United Nations International Organizations. In this role she is responsible for developing the key strategic objectives, mission-related partnerships and solution strategies across... Read More →


Thursday May 19, 2016 14:00 - 14:45
Giraffe 209

14:00

Increasing Smallholder Productivity, Income and Financial Inclusion through Technology (1.5 Hours)
Limited Capacity filling up

This panel discussion will be hosted by the Mercy Corps AgriFin Accelerate and AgriFin Mobile programming teams, which extend through Asia and Africa working on technology innovation for smallholder farmers. Mercy Corps will host a panel discussion of leading practitioners across MNOs, banks, technology companies and alternative data providers to explore:
- Opportunities to serve farmers using digital financial and non-financial services
- Successful models to date
- Learning and Challenges to date
- Models for Collaboration and Bundling of Services across market stakeholders

Moderators
avatar for Sieka Gatabaki

Sieka Gatabaki

Digital Financial Services Manager, Mercy Corps AgriFin Program
Sieka Gatabaki – Financial Services Manager. Before joining AgriFin Sieka served as Technical Advisor with IFC managing their Airtel Money Uganda accelerator program since August 2014. With over 12 years’ experience spanning from social entrepreneurship to telecommunications... Read More →
avatar for Lucy Kioko

Lucy Kioko

Agriculture Product Manager, Mercy Corps AgriFin Program
Lucy Kioko - Agricultural Product Manager. Lucy brings in experience from working in agricultural development in Kenya and the East African region. She has worked with a number of local, international NGOs and private sector companies in agribusiness in the area of value chain development... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Craig Heintzman

Craig Heintzman

CEO, Arifu
Craig is the Founder and CEO of Arifu, an edtech company with a personal learning companion making it possible for anyone to freely access training and education from the organizations they trust over any mobile phone. Since launching in East Africa in 2015, over 500,000 people have... Read More →
avatar for Rita Kimani

Rita Kimani

Co-Founder/CEO, FarmDrive
VAS
PM

Paul Mbugua

Group CEO, Eclectics Int'l. Ltd.
Mr. Paul Mbugua is a well-known Africa wide banking ICT professional with strengths in business process reengineering, project management and Innovations. He has been instrumental in implementing critical automation projects for many banks across Africa. As a Chartered qualified banker... Read More →
AM

Attul Mittal

Executive Director, Mount Meru Group


Thursday May 19, 2016 14:00 - 15:30
Giraffe 208

14:45

Global Mentoring Platform: Democratizing Access to Social Capital for Entrepreneurs
Limited Capacity seats available

MicroMentor is a global online community that leverages the power of mentoring to help entrepreneurs thrive with the help from volunteer business mentors. It's a social enterprise incubating within Mercy Corps, a leading global organization powered by the belief that a better world is possible. Conceived in the FIELD program at the Aspen Institute, it was a solution aimed at democratizing access to social capital, the lack of which was identified as a significant cause for entrepreneurs' inability to succeed. In the U.S. (2014) MicroMentor added 2,100 jobs and $14 million in increased revenues. Startups using MicroMentor are increasing their survival rate by 25%. There are over 15,000 active mentor-mentee matches globally who are tackling the rising pressure for both local and global economies to grow and diversify to absorb the next generation of professionals into the labor market. Our model is rooted in providing decent work and economic growth opportunities for those most unlikely to access social capital - low-income, women, immigrant communities, and outside urban hubs. We believe in scaling access to mentoring and critical business know-how by leveraging partnerships - public, private and civil society. The discussion will present one such partnership with our corporate partner HPE who run their skills based employee engagement program on their instance of this technology - HPE Advisors portal powered by MicroMentor. Hundreds of HPE employees are supporting non-profits, social entrepreneurs and small businesses around 90 countries. We want to share our story of how working together with partners, technology can help entrepreneurs and small businesses thrive.

Speakers
avatar for Anita Ramachandran

Anita Ramachandran

Director, MicroMentor, Mercy Corps
Anita Ramachandran is the Director of MicroMentor at Mercy Corps. She drives MicroMentor's global development efforts and cultivates partnerships with organizations interested in establishing and growing an employee engagement solution or mentoring program. She is passionate about... Read More →



Thursday May 19, 2016 14:45 - 15:30
Giraffe 210

14:45

Microsoft's Approach to Incorporating the SDGs into Our Business Models
Limited Capacity full

With the announcement of the new Sustainable Development Goals by the United Nations, Microsoft has taken the path of incorporating SDGs from the top down into their business, services and approach. While our efforts are still in the early stages, learn about some of the thought processes, approaches and plans to grow towards a global organization making societal impact and empowering more people across the globe to do more


Speakers
avatar for Kate Krukiel

Kate Krukiel

Director of Strategic Partnerships, Microsoft
Kate Krukiel joined Microsoft in 2006 and is currently the Technology Advisor for Partnerships for the United Nations International Organizations. In this role she is responsible for developing the key strategic objectives, mission-related partnerships and solution strategies across... Read More →


Thursday May 19, 2016 14:45 - 15:30
Giraffe 209