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The annual ICT4D Conferences have proven to be an invaluable opportunity for NGOs, private sector organizations, universities, governmental agencies and foundations to share their experience in using ICT to increase the impact of development programs and to learn from each other.  In 2016, 715 individuals from 76 countries and 301 private sector and public sector and civil society explored the ways to harness the full power of digital solutions to achieve the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals.  Our thanks to Accenture, Catholic Relief Services, Esri, Hewlett Packard Enterprise, iMerit Technology Services, Inmarsat, IS Solutions, Making All Voices Count, Mercy Corps, Microsoft, NetHope, Oxfam, Pandexio, Qualcom Wireless Reach, RTI International, SimbaNet and World Vision for making that possible.

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06- Environmental Protection [clear filter]
Monday, May 16
 

10:45

Open Geo-Data 4 SDGs: A Case Study from Rwanda
Limited Capacity seats available

In our increasingly interconnected world, the Sustainable Development Goals will be difficult to reach, if implementing agencies are not able to access relevant data openly and share data they collect, to allow everyone to be informed on the progress made towards reaching these Goals: It is therefore no coincidence, the term Data Revolution gained momentum in conjunction with the SDGs.
Showcasing the National Land Use Planning Portal (NLUPP) from Rwanda, this presentation highlights the importance of opening up and shows how a map - or today its digital form, a Geographic Information System - is the natural place where data from many disciplines converges, supporting us on our way towards meeting the SDGs.
The NLUPP - launched in 2014 as the first portal of its kind on the continent of Africa - allows the Public, Researchers, NGO and Government officials to easily access land-use plans and other spatial data on the web: "Transparency and making data accessible for the public are important aspects of democracy," said the director of democracy and good governance at USAID in Rwanda at the launch. "Open data makes space for meaningful input from the public, civil society, and the private sector and gives those groups and policymakers access to data to inform civic discussion and policy."
Since its launch, continuously more data has been published to the NLUPP, making this portal a precursor of the Data Revolution for SDGs.

Speakers
avatar for Kaspar Kundert

Kaspar Kundert

Managing Director, Esri Rwanda Ltd.
Kaspar Kundert holds a Master Degree in Geography and IT from the University in Zurich, Switzerland. He worked as a GIS Specialist for UNEP in Nairobi, before spending 18 years in Switzerland, founding and then managing a GIS company. In 2010, Kaspar moved to Kigali, where he founded... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 10:45 - 11:30
Giraffe 257

10:45

The Animal Protection Index: Mainstreaming Animal Welfare
Limited Capacity seats available

In Africa, animal welfare is not a stand-alone issue; it is linked to the achievement of human livelihood priorities, improved food security, increased community resilience, and poverty eradication. The Animal Protection Index (API) platform establishes a classification of 50 countries around the world according to their commitments to protect animals and improve animal welfare in policy and legislation. The World Animal Protection conducted comprehensive country assessments based on the following indicator areas - recognizing animal protection; providing humane education; governance structures and systems; promoting communication and awareness, and; animal welfare standards. The tool is intended to assess policy and so contribute to the inclusion of animal welfare in the global agenda. In addition, the API will leverage key stakeholders to influence countries to improve animal welfare performance, and measure improvements in animal welfare policy over time. The API is part of a broader agenda by the World Animal Protection aimed at mainstreaming animal welfare globally and securing a Universal Declaration on Animal Welfare. Momentum for animal protection has gained significant traction, following declarations around the Sustainable Development Goals on its importance in the agriculture, disaster, diseases, and wildlife contexts.

Speakers
avatar for Tennyson Williams

Tennyson Williams

Regional Director, Africa, World Animal Protection
Tennyson Williams is the Regional Director - Africa for the World Animal Protection. He is an international development specialist with a background in zoology and zoonotic diseases, and experience spanning more than 15 years in INGO management and leadership. Williams has extensive... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 10:45 - 11:30
Giraffe 256

11:30

Open Geo-Data 4 SDGs: A Case Study from Rwanda
Limited Capacity filling up

In our increasingly interconnected world, the Sustainable Development Goals will be difficult to reach, if implementing agencies won't be able to access relevant data openly and share data they collect, to allow everyone to be informed on the progress made towards reaching these Goals: It is therefore no coincidence, the term Data Revolution gained momentum in conjunction with the SDGs.
Showcasing the National Land Use Planning Portal (NLUPP) from Rwanda, this presentation highlights the importance of opening up and shows how a map - or today its digital form, a Geographic Information System - is the natural place where data from many disciplines converges, supporting us on our way towards meeting the SDGs.
The NLUPP - launched in 2014 as the first portal of its kind on the continent of Africa - allows the Public, Researchers, NGO and Government officials to easily access land-use plans and other spatial data on the web: "Transparency and making data accessible for the public are important aspects of democracy," said the director of democracy and good governance at USAID in Rwanda at the launch. "Open data makes space for meaningful input from the public, civil society, and the private sector and gives those groups and policymakers access to data to inform civic discussion and policy."
Since its launch, continuously more data has been published to the NLUPP, making this portal a precursor of the Data Revolution for SDGs.

Speakers
avatar for Kaspar Kundert

Kaspar Kundert

Managing Director, Esri Rwanda Ltd.
Kaspar Kundert holds a Master Degree in Geography and IT from the University in Zurich, Switzerland. He worked as a GIS Specialist for UNEP in Nairobi, before spending 18 years in Switzerland, founding and then managing a GIS company. In 2010, Kaspar moved to Kigali, where he founded... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 11:30 - 12:15
Giraffe 257

11:30

The Animal Protection Index: Mainstreaming Animal Welfare
Limited Capacity seats available

In Africa, animal welfare is not a stand-alone issue; it is linked to the achievement of human livelihood priorities, improved food security, increased community resilience, and poverty eradication. The Animal Protection Index (API) platform establishes a classification of 50 countries around the world according to their commitments to protect animals and improve animal welfare in policy and legislation. The World Animal Protection conducted comprehensive country assessments based on the following indicator areas - recognizing animal protection; providing humane education; governance structures and systems; promoting communication and awareness, and; animal welfare standards. The tool is intended to assess policy and so contribute to the inclusion of animal welfare in the global agenda. In addition, the API will leverage key stakeholders to influence countries to improve animal welfare performance, and measure improvements in animal welfare policy over time. The API is part of a broader agenda by the World Animal Protection aimed at mainstreaming animal welfare globally and securing a Universal Declaration on Animal Welfare. Momentum for animal protection has gained significant traction, following declarations around the Sustainable Development Goals on its importance in the agriculture, disaster, diseases, and wildlife contexts.

Speakers
avatar for Tennyson Williams

Tennyson Williams

Regional Director, Africa, World Animal Protection
Tennyson Williams is the Regional Director - Africa for the World Animal Protection. He is an international development specialist with a background in zoology and zoonotic diseases, and experience spanning more than 15 years in INGO management and leadership. Williams has extensive... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 11:30 - 12:15
Giraffe 256

12:15

Open Geo-Data 4 SDGs: A Case Study from Rwanda
Limited Capacity seats available

In our increasingly interconnected world, the Sustainable Development Goals will be difficult to reach, if implementing agencies won't be able to access relevant data openly and share data they collect, to allow everyone to be informed on the progress made towards reaching these Goals: It is therefore no coincidence, the term Data Revolution gained momentum in conjunction with the SDGs.
Showcasing the National Land Use Planning Portal (NLUPP) from Rwanda, this presentation highlights the importance of opening up and shows how a map - or today its digital form, a Geographic Information System - is the natural place where data from many disciplines converges, supporting us on our way towards meeting the SDGs.
The NLUPP - launched in 2014 as the first portal of its kind on the continent of Africa - allows the Public, Researchers, NGO and Government officials to easily access land-use plans and other spatial data on the web: "Transparency and making data accessible for the public are important aspects of democracy," said the director of democracy and good governance at USAID in Rwanda at the launch. "Open data makes space for meaningful input from the public, civil society, and the private sector and gives those groups and policymakers access to data to inform civic discussion and policy."
Since its launch, continuously more data has been published to the NLUPP, making this portal a precursor of the Data Revolution for SDGs.

Speakers
avatar for Kaspar Kundert

Kaspar Kundert

Managing Director, Esri Rwanda Ltd.
Kaspar Kundert holds a Master Degree in Geography and IT from the University in Zurich, Switzerland. He worked as a GIS Specialist for UNEP in Nairobi, before spending 18 years in Switzerland, founding and then managing a GIS company. In 2010, Kaspar moved to Kigali, where he founded... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 12:15 - 13:00
Giraffe 257

12:15

The Animal Protection Index: Mainstreaming Animal Welfare
Limited Capacity seats available

In Africa, animal welfare is not a stand-alone issue; it is linked to the achievement of human livelihood priorities, improved food security, increased community resilience, and poverty eradication. The Animal Protection Index (API) platform establishes a classification of 50 countries around the world according to their commitments to protect animals and improve animal welfare in policy and legislation. The World Animal Protection conducted comprehensive country assessments based on the following indicator areas - recognizing animal protection; providing humane education; governance structures and systems; promoting communication and awareness, and; animal welfare standards. The tool is intended to assess policy and so contribute to the inclusion of animal welfare in the global agenda. In addition, the API will leverage key stakeholders to influence countries to improve animal welfare performance, and measure improvements in animal welfare policy over time. The API is part of a broader agenda by the World Animal Protection aimed at mainstreaming animal welfare globally and securing a Universal Declaration on Animal Welfare. Momentum for animal protection has gained significant traction, following declarations around the Sustainable Development Goals on its importance in the agriculture, disaster, diseases, and wildlife contexts.

Speakers
avatar for Tennyson Williams

Tennyson Williams

Regional Director, Africa, World Animal Protection
Tennyson Williams is the Regional Director - Africa for the World Animal Protection. He is an international development specialist with a background in zoology and zoonotic diseases, and experience spanning more than 15 years in INGO management and leadership. Williams has extensive... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 12:15 - 13:00
Giraffe 256

14:00

EcoTech Moz: Hackathons to Leverage Young Local Talent and Multi-Skilled Collaboration to Solve Challenges in Mozambique
Limited Capacity seats available

Mozambique is a country known world-wide for its vast natural resources and remarkable levels of biodiversity. However, in recent years, there has been a growing number of challenges that affect and put the country's environmental balance at risk, such as deforestation, illegal poaching, lack of environmental education, urban waste, among others.

Country policies and conventional conservation programs have been insufficient to ensure the protection of the environment and, as these challenges aggravate, Mozambique sees an urgent need for alternative and innovative means to achieve sustainable development, now and for future generations.

In light of this urgency, we have created a platform that leverages growing groups of young IT enthusiasts to focus their talent on solving some of the country's environmental issues. In the format of a hackathon - intensive working sessions to create solutions of technological base to a specific challenge - EcoTech Mozambique brings together talented IT developers and national and international experts in the areas of business development, marketing, technology and environment to create and develop whole-rounded, context-relevant and self-sustainable prototypes and/ or projects to Mozambique's environmental challenges. The solutions are then presented to decision-makers, from NGOs to donors, to public and private sector, in order to gather feedback for improvement and, in the best cases, ensure implementation.

Solutions developed so far range from: participatory waste management, illegal poaching citizen monitoring, data gathering tool for marine conservation, environmental games, to mention a few.

By creating this alternative form of developing context-relevant and market-driven solutions for environmental sustainability, we are not only coming up with successful ideas or improving existing ones, but also boosting young local talent and creativeness, the very nascent IT and entrepreneurial ecosystem in the country and establishing the missing link between environment and technology that many environmental experts and interested parties are still unaware of.

Speakers
avatar for Erika Rodrigues

Erika Rodrigues

Project Manager, UX Information Technologies
Erika Rodrigues is a community engagement specialist and project manager, currently working in Mozambique with UX Information Technologies, a local start-up focused on boosting competencies and employability of the Mozambican youth through disruptive, context-relevant and sustainable... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 14:00 - 14:45
Giraffe 256

14:00

Land Degradation in Somalia
Limited Capacity seats available

Following more than 20 years of civil unrest, environmental information for Southern Somalia is relatively scarce, but there are clear signs that the war economy - fuelled by the on-going conflict - is rapidly depleting the country's natural resources. Illegal wood charcoal production and export is a major activity. However, there has been little quantitative information on the extent of charcoal production due to the inaccessibility of the area and the difficulty in detecting tree loss or charcoal production sites from publicly available satellite images.

Prosopis juliflora is a fast growing tree species originating from South and Central America and with a high invasive potential in semi-arid areas around the globe. It was introduced to East Africa in the 1970's and 1980's to stabilize dune systems and to provide fuel wood after prolonged droughts and deforestation. The species has expanded rapidly and become difficult to control. It has competitive advantages over native species considering that it is extremely drought tolerant with its thorny thickets invade into drier grasslands and rangelands.

The FAO-executed Somalia Water and Land Information Management project (SWALIM) has applied advanced Remote Sensing and GIS technology to these two threats and provided specific and quantitative evidence which can now help the Somalia authorities and development partners to combat these dangers.

Speakers
avatar for James Ngochoch

James Ngochoch

GIS Officer, Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO)
Over 7 years educational and work experiences in various humanitarian, environmental and community projects within and outside Kenya. Currently working as a GIS Officer for Somalia Water and Land Information Management (SWALIM) project implemented under FAO-UN Somalia program. Possess... Read More →



Monday May 16, 2016 14:00 - 14:45
Giraffe 257

14:45

EcoTech Moz: Hackathons to Leverage Young Local Talent and Multi-Skilled Collaboration to Solve Challenges in Mozambique
Limited Capacity seats available

Mozambique is a country known world-wide for its vast natural resources and remarkable levels of biodiversity. However, in recent years, there has been a growing number of challenges that affect and put the country's environmental balance at risk, such as deforestation, illegal poaching, lack of environmental education, urban waste, among others.

Country policies and conventional conservation programs have been insufficient to ensure the protection of the environment and, as these challenges aggravate, Mozambique sees an urgent need for alternative and innovative means to achieve sustainable development, now and for future generations.

In light of this urgency, we have created a platform that leverages growing groups of young IT enthusiasts to focus their talent on solving some of the country's environmental issues. In the format of a hackathon - intensive working sessions to create solutions of technological base to a specific challenge - EcoTech Mozambique brings together talented IT developers and national and international experts in the areas of business development, marketing, technology and environment to create and develop whole-rounded, context-relevant and self-sustainable prototypes and/ or projects to Mozambique's environmental challenges. The solutions are then presented to decision-makers, from NGOs to donors, to public and private sector, in order to gather feedback for improvement and, in the best cases, ensure implementation.

Solutions developed so far range from: participatory waste management, illegal poaching citizen monitoring, data gathering tool for marine conservation, environmental games, to mention a few.

By creating this alternative form of developing context-relevant and market-driven solutions for environmental sustainability, we are not only coming up with successful ideas or improving existing ones, but also boosting young local talent and creativeness, the very nascent IT and entrepreneurial ecosystem in the country and establishing the missing link between environment and technology that many environmental experts and interested parties are still unaware of.

Speakers
avatar for Erika Rodrigues

Erika Rodrigues

Project Manager, UX Information Technologies
Erika Rodrigues is a community engagement specialist and project manager, currently working in Mozambique with UX Information Technologies, a local start-up focused on boosting competencies and employability of the Mozambican youth through disruptive, context-relevant and sustainable... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 14:45 - 15:30
Giraffe 256

14:45

Land Degradation in Somalia
Limited Capacity seats available

Following more than 20 years of civil unrest, environmental information for Southern Somalia is relatively scarce, but there are clear signs that the war economy - fuelled by the on-going conflict - is rapidly depleting the country's natural resources. Illegal wood charcoal production and export is a major activity. However, there has been little quantitative information on the extent of charcoal production due to the inaccessibility of the area and the difficulty in detecting tree loss or charcoal production sites from publicly available satellite images.

Prosopis juliflora is a fast growing tree species originating from South and Central America and with a high invasive potential in semi-arid areas around the globe. It was introduced to East Africa in the 1970's and 1980's to stabilize dune systems and to provide fuel wood after prolonged droughts and deforestation. The species has expanded rapidly and become difficult to control. It has competitive advantages over native species considering that it is extremely drought tolerant with its thorny thickets invade into drier grasslands and rangelands.

The FAO-executed Somalia Water and Land Information Management project (SWALIM) has applied advanced Remote Sensing and GIS technology to these two threats and provided specific and quantitative evidence which can now help the Somalia authorities and development partners to combat these dangers.

Speakers
avatar for James Ngochoch

James Ngochoch

GIS Officer, Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO)
Over 7 years educational and work experiences in various humanitarian, environmental and community projects within and outside Kenya. Currently working as a GIS Officer for Somalia Water and Land Information Management (SWALIM) project implemented under FAO-UN Somalia program. Possess... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 14:45 - 15:30
Giraffe 257

16:00

Emerging and Future ICT Solutions to Conserve Biodiversity
Limited Capacity seats available

Humanity exists at the intersection of two unprecedented ages. The first is of information and the ubiquitous computing that people have come to rely on in nearly all aspects of existence. The second is the Anthropocene - a new geological age characterized by exceptionally, exponentially negative and rapid impacts of human activities on earth's natural systems. One of the fundamental challenges of our time is to leverage the architecture of the information age to counter the Anthropocene. Much of that architecture will rest on increasingly intelligent IT that will help us to monitor, model, and manage environmental systems. This talk will highlight the rapid integration of ICT solutions for biodiversity conservation and illustrate the difficulties and promise of instrumenting natural systems.


Speakers
avatar for Dr. Lucas Joppa

Dr. Lucas Joppa

Microsoft Research, Microsoft
Lucas Joppa is an environmental scientist at Microsoft Research where he leads engagements on environmental sustainability and heads a research program on artificial intelligence, machine learning, and ubiquitous computing technologies for monitoring, modeling, and managing earth's... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 16:00 - 16:45
Giraffe 256

16:00

Kenya's Biodiversity Atlas - Mapping Kenya's Natural Capital for Sustainable Development
Limited Capacity seats available

Natural capital is the stock of natural ecosystems that yield a flow of valuable ecosystem goods and services. Mapping Kenya's natural capital is a first step to evaluating the status of our biodiversity and documenting the potential therein and the threats it faces.

Speakers
avatar for Lucy Waruingi

Lucy Waruingi

Executive Director, African Conservation Centre
Lucy Waruingi has been responsible for the co-ordination and successful implementation of various grants at ACC over many years including ecological and socio-economic field surveys. She also has extensive experience in project management and in the co-ordination of multi stake-holder... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 16:00 - 16:45
Giraffe 257

16:45

Emerging and Future ICT Solutions to Conserve Biodiversity
Limited Capacity seats available

Humanity exists at the intersection of two unprecedented ages. The first is of information and the ubiquitous computing that people have come to rely on in nearly all aspects of existence. The second is the Anthropocene – a new geological age characterized by exceptionally, exponentially negative and rapid impacts of human activities on earth’s nature systems. One of the fundamental challenges of our time is to leverage the architecture of the information age to counter the Anthropocene. Much of that architecture will rest on increasingly intelligent IT that will help us monitor, model, and manage environmental systems. This talk will highlight the rapid integration of ICT solutions for biodiversity conservation and illustrate the difficulties and promise of instrumenting natural systems. 

Speakers
avatar for Dr. Lucas Joppa

Dr. Lucas Joppa

Microsoft Research, Microsoft
Lucas Joppa is an environmental scientist at Microsoft Research where he leads engagements on environmental sustainability and heads a research program on artificial intelligence, machine learning, and ubiquitous computing technologies for monitoring, modeling, and managing earth's... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 16:45 - 17:30
Giraffe 256

16:45

Kenya's Biodiversity Atlas - Mapping Kenya's Natural Capital for Sustainable Development
Limited Capacity seats available

Natural capital is the stock of natural ecosystems that yield a flow of valuable ecosystem goods and services. Mapping Kenya's natural capital is a first step to evaluating the status of our biodiversity and documenting the potential therein and the threats it faces.

Speakers
avatar for Lucy Waruingi

Lucy Waruingi

Executive Director, African Conservation Centre
Lucy Waruingi has been responsible for the co-ordination and successful implementation of various grants at ACC over many years including ecological and socio-economic field surveys. She also has extensive experience in project management and in the co-ordination of multi stake-holder... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 16:45 - 17:30
Giraffe 257
 
Tuesday, May 17
 

10:45

Action for Cheetahs in Kenya: Framework for a National Cheetah Survey
Limited Capacity seats available

Action for Cheetahs in Kenya (ACK) is the only range wide cheetah conservation organization in Kenya. ACK conducted the first Kenya national cheetah survey in collaboration with the Kenya Wildlife Service, Cheetah Conservation Fund and the East African Wildlife Society between 2004 and 2007. Results of the survey formed the baseline for national and regional strategic planning in collaboration with IUCN and other cheetah experts from across Africa. Although we had some bias in the collection methodology we were the first to create a range wide map of cheetahs based on actual site visitation to all corners of the country. This presentation will highlight the changes being made to the first survey in order to assure the second survey will improve our knowledge. Occupancy modeling and genetic mapping will be used to conduct the second nationwide cheetah survey beginning in 2016. Detection dogs will locate scat to evaluate prey selection, cheetah health and genetic variability. Remote sensing technology will test assumptions on land use change affecting cheetah habitat. Models developed from the previous survey will be discussed in this presentation. The role of the local community and the international zoological facilities will be presented to encourage greater participation in the second national cheetah survey.

Speakers
avatar for Mary Wykstra

Mary Wykstra

Executive Director, Carnivores, Livelihoods and Landscapes
I have worked in Kenya since 2001, after two previous years of internship with the Cheetah Conservation Fund in Namibia. Our studies are in affiliation with the Kenya Wildlife Service and permitted through the Kenyan Ministry of Science and Technology. I completed my Master of Environmental... Read More →



Tuesday May 17, 2016 10:45 - 11:30
Giraffe 252

10:45

Mapping and Ecologically Assessing Landholdings of the Catholic Church
Limited Capacity seats available

The Catholic Church comprises the largest nongovernmental networks of education and healthcare around the world; it is probable that it also comprises the largest network of landholdings. The GoodLand Project seeks to increase the Catholic Church's geographic understanding and planning of its landholdings using geographic information technologies and community involvement and demonstrate how these lands can be a means for positive global environmental and social change. We are working with the extant social infrastructure of the Church to make this happen.

As part of our work we are evaluating and classifying dioceses, globally, for climate change vulnerability. This will identify Catholic dioceses and provinces where, based on economic and environmental models, threats such as drought, flood, or conflict are most likely to have the greatest impact within the next several decades. Diocesan classification enables us to identify a key set of data needs for diocesan-scale planning for areas that have comparable ecological and social environments.

Planning projects on the scale of a diocese involves applying a geodesign framework to integrate existing community networks, crowd-source information, and conduct analyzes that rank Church-affiliate properties within a diocese based on their potential to enhance environmental and social welfare through landscape management and land-use changes, such as green infrastructure or forest management. Our online platforms can help communities to understand which resources may be put to best use and where. Other Catholic organizations with a variety of goals, from asset management to humanitarian aid, can employ the geospatial data we produce to reach their goals.

Speakers
avatar for Molly Burhans

Molly Burhans

Executive Director, GoodLands
Molly Burhans is the founder of GoodLands. She lead GoodLands’ Enterprise GIS team to make the first global digital maps of the Catholic Church and lay the foundation for a global Catholic spatial data infrastructure. She is involved with the Vatican Youth Symposium, work involving... Read More →


Tuesday May 17, 2016 10:45 - 11:30
Giraffe 254

11:30

Action for Cheetahs in Kenya: Framework for a National Cheetah Survey
Limited Capacity seats available

Action for Cheetahs in Kenya (ACK) is the only range wide cheetah conservation organization in Kenya. ACK conducted the first Kenya national cheetah survey in collaboration with the Kenya Wildlife Service, Cheetah Conservation Fund and the East African Wildlife Society between 2004 and 2007. Results of the survey formed the baseline for national and regional strategic planning in collaboration with IUCN and other cheetah experts from across Africa. Although we had some bias in the collection methodology we were the first to create a range wide map of cheetahs based on actual site visitation to all corners of the country. This presentation will highlight the changes being made to the first survey in order to assure the second survey will improve our knowledge. Occupancy modeling and genetic mapping will be used to conduct the second nationwide cheetah survey beginning in 2016. Detection dogs will locate scat to evaluate prey selection, cheetah health and genetic variability. Remote sensing technology will test assumptions on land use change affecting cheetah habitat. Models developed from the previous survey will be discussed in this presentation. The role of the local community and the international zoological facilities will be presented to encourage greater participation in the second national cheetah survey.

Speakers
avatar for Mary Wykstra

Mary Wykstra

Executive Director, Carnivores, Livelihoods and Landscapes
I have worked in Kenya since 2001, after two previous years of internship with the Cheetah Conservation Fund in Namibia. Our studies are in affiliation with the Kenya Wildlife Service and permitted through the Kenyan Ministry of Science and Technology. I completed my Master of Environmental... Read More →


Tuesday May 17, 2016 11:30 - 12:15
Giraffe 252

11:30

Mapping and Ecologically Assessing Landholdings of the Catholic Church
Limited Capacity seats available

The Catholic Church comprises the largest nongovernmental networks of education and healthcare around the world; it is probable that it also comprises the largest network of landholdings. The GoodLand Project seeks to increase the Catholic Church's geographic understanding and planning of its landholdings using geographic information technologies and community involvement and demonstrate how these lands can be a means for positive global environmental and social change. We are working with the extant social infrastructure of the Church to make this happen.

As part of our work we are evaluating and classifying dioceses, globally, for climate change vulnerability. This will identify Catholic dioceses and provinces where, based on economic and environmental models, threats such as drought, flood, or conflict are most likely to have the greatest impact within the next several decades. Diocesan classification enables us to identify a key set of data needs for diocesan-scale planning for areas that have comparable ecological and social environments.

Planning projects on the scale of a diocese involves applying a geodesign framework to integrate existing community networks, crowd-source information, and conduct analyzes that rank Church-affiliate properties within a diocese based on their potential to enhance environmental and social welfare through landscape management and land-use changes, such as green infrastructure or forest management. Our online platforms can help communities to understand which resources may be put to best use and where. Other Catholic organizations with a variety of goals, from asset management to humanitarian aid, can employ the geospatial data we produce to reach their goals.

Speakers
avatar for Molly Burhans

Molly Burhans

Executive Director, GoodLands
Molly Burhans is the founder of GoodLands. She lead GoodLands’ Enterprise GIS team to make the first global digital maps of the Catholic Church and lay the foundation for a global Catholic spatial data infrastructure. She is involved with the Vatican Youth Symposium, work involving... Read More →


Tuesday May 17, 2016 11:30 - 12:15
Giraffe 254

12:15

Action for Cheetahs in Kenya: Framework for a National Cheetah Survey
Limited Capacity seats available

Action for Cheetahs in Kenya (ACK) is the only range wide cheetah conservation organization in Kenya. ACK conducted the first Kenya national cheetah survey in collaboration with the Kenya Wildlife Service, Cheetah Conservation Fund and the East African Wildlife Society between 2004 and 2007. Results of the survey formed the baseline for national and regional strategic planning in collaboration with IUCN and other cheetah experts from across Africa. Although we had some bias in the collection methodology we were the first to create a range wide map of cheetahs based on actual site visitation to all corners of the country. This presentation will highlight the changes being made to the first survey in order to assure the second survey will improve our knowledge. Occupancy modeling and genetic mapping will be used to conduct the second nationwide cheetah survey beginning in 2016. Detection dogs will locate scat to evaluate prey selection, cheetah health and genetic variability. Remote sensing technology will test assumptions on land use change affecting cheetah habitat. Models developed from the previous survey will be discussed in this presentation. The role of the local community and the international zoological facilities will be presented to encourage greater participation in the second national cheetah survey.

Speakers
avatar for Mary Wykstra

Mary Wykstra

Executive Director, Carnivores, Livelihoods and Landscapes
I have worked in Kenya since 2001, after two previous years of internship with the Cheetah Conservation Fund in Namibia. Our studies are in affiliation with the Kenya Wildlife Service and permitted through the Kenyan Ministry of Science and Technology. I completed my Master of Environmental... Read More →


Tuesday May 17, 2016 12:15 - 13:00
Giraffe 252

12:15

Mapping and Ecologically Assessing Landholdings of the Catholic Church
Limited Capacity seats available

The Catholic Church comprises the largest nongovernmental networks of education and healthcare around the world; it is probable that it also comprises the largest network of landholdings. The GoodLand Project seeks to increase the Catholic Church's geographic understanding and planning of its landholdings using geographic information technologies and community involvement and demonstrate how these lands can be a means for positive global environmental and social change. We are working with the extant social infrastructure of the Church to make this happen.

As part of our work we are evaluating and classifying dioceses, globally, for climate change vulnerability. This will identify Catholic dioceses and provinces where, based on economic and environmental models, threats such as drought, flood, or conflict are most likely to have the greatest impact within the next several decades. Diocesan classification enables us to identify a key set of data needs for diocesan-scale planning for areas that have comparable ecological and social environments.

Planning projects on the scale of a diocese involves applying a geodesign framework to integrate existing community networks, crowd-source information, and conduct analyzes that rank Church-affiliate properties within a diocese based on their potential to enhance environmental and social welfare through landscape management and land-use changes, such as green infrastructure or forest management. Our online platforms can help communities to understand which resources may be put to best use and where. Other Catholic organizations with a variety of goals, from asset management to humanitarian aid, can employ the geospatial data we produce to reach their goals.

Speakers
avatar for Molly Burhans

Molly Burhans

Executive Director, GoodLands
Molly Burhans is the founder of GoodLands. She lead GoodLands’ Enterprise GIS team to make the first global digital maps of the Catholic Church and lay the foundation for a global Catholic spatial data infrastructure. She is involved with the Vatican Youth Symposium, work involving... Read More →


Tuesday May 17, 2016 12:15 - 13:00
Giraffe 254

14:00

'Systems, Not Apps': Effective mHealth at Scale
Limited Capacity seats available

The conservancy model places conservation in the hands of the community and drives growth and management of communal lands from the grassroots. NRT conservancies use Community based Management and Monitoring System (COMMS) to inform processes and decision making for conservation and sustainable growth. These integrated knowledge management systems include participatory mapping, data collection, data management and visualization, and feedback.

Speakers
DG

Deepali Gohil

Data Scientist, Northern Rangelands Trust
Deepali Gohil works as a Data Scientist at the Northern Rangelands Trust. She is responsible for supporting effective and efficient management and implementation of the NRT programs and projects through driving conservation and development results planning, monitoring, evaluation... Read More →


ICT4D pdf

Tuesday May 17, 2016 14:00 - 14:45
Giraffe 252

14:00

Maximizing GIS Investments for Improved Park Management
Limited Capacity seats available

Tanzania National Parks (TANAPA) Geographical Information Systems (GIS) Unit was established in 2012, with the full support of the organization's budget in order to support day to day park operations and improve field outcomes, especially those related to anti-poaching operations and reporting. Under this framework, TANAPA has a fully equipped Standard ARCGIS for Server Enterprise, which is presumably supposed to serve all of its sixteen parks located in various ecosystems within the country, ranging from savannas, mountainous forests, flood plains, aquatic/lakes and marine environment
The ArcGIS Server is centrally located at TANAPA Headquarters, where it is supposed to link/sync directly from field back and forth to the Server, providing near/real time reports (data) to park managers from park rangers working in the field. The near/real time data will improve law enforcement operations outcomes by providing accurate and timely reports (data) to park managers who are not necessarily in the same spot/field locations all the time as park rangers
TANAPA's GIS Unit envisions a future state where geospatial data from all of Tanzania's national parks is managed centrally and published to dashboards in order to automate consuming report creation processes and enable self-service "just-in-time" management access and decision making for improved fields operations outcomes. In so doing, management dashboards will serve TANAPA executives by providing daily and timely reports from each of the sixteen park's at the palms of their hands while contributing to the overall organization efficiency. This paper outlines outcomes/achievement within TANAPA in using GIS technologies while pin pointing some key challenges encountered in the process

Speakers
avatar for Dr. David White

Dr. David White

Research Assistant Professor/Chief Science and Technology Officer, Clemson Center for Geospatial Technologies, Clemson University
Dr. White is a Research Assistant Professor in the Department of Parks, Recreation and Tourism Management, Clemson University, USA. He has a strong background in desktop GIS focused on spatial analytics and implementation of GIS enterprise systems. His past efforts include the development... Read More →


Tuesday May 17, 2016 14:00 - 14:45
Giraffe 254

14:45

'Systems, Not Apps': Effective mHealth at Scale
Limited Capacity seats available

The conservancy model places conservation in the hands of the community and drives growth and management of communal lands from the grassroots. NRT conservancies use Community based Management and Monitoring System (COMMS) to inform processes and decision making for conservation and sustainable growth. These integrated knowledge management systems include participatory mapping, data collection, data management and visualization, and feedback.

Speakers
DG

Deepali Gohil

Data Scientist, Northern Rangelands Trust
Deepali Gohil works as a Data Scientist at the Northern Rangelands Trust. She is responsible for supporting effective and efficient management and implementation of the NRT programs and projects through driving conservation and development results planning, monitoring, evaluation... Read More →


Tuesday May 17, 2016 14:45 - 15:30
Giraffe 252

14:45

Maximizing GIS Investments for Improved Park Management
Limited Capacity seats available

Tanzania National Parks (TANAPA) Geographical Information Systems (GIS) Unit was established in 2012, with the full support of the organization's budget in order to support day to day park operations and improve field outcomes, especially those related to anti-poaching operations and reporting. Under this framework, TANAPA has a fully equipped Standard ARCGIS for Server Enterprise, which is presumably supposed to serve all of its sixteen parks located in various ecosystems within the country, ranging from savannas, mountainous forests, flood plains, aquatic/lakes and marine environment
The ArcGIS Server is centrally located at TANAPA Headquarters, where it is supposed to link/sync directly from field back and forth to the Server, providing near/real time reports (data) to park managers from park rangers working in the field. The near/real time data will improve law enforcement operations outcomes by providing accurate and timely reports (data) to park managers who are not necessarily in the same spot/field locations all the time as park rangers
TANAPA's GIS Unit envisions a future state where geospatial data from all of Tanzania's national parks is managed centrally and published to dashboards in order to automate consuming report creation processes and enable self-service "just-in-time" management access and decision making for improved fields operations outcomes. In so doing, management dashboards will serve TANAPA executives by providing daily and timely reports from each of the sixteen park's at the palms of their hands while contributing to the overall organization efficiency. This paper outlines outcomes/achievement within TANAPA in using GIS technologies while pin pointing some key challenges encountered in the process

Speakers
avatar for Dr. David White

Dr. David White

Research Assistant Professor/Chief Science and Technology Officer, Clemson Center for Geospatial Technologies, Clemson University
Dr. White is a Research Assistant Professor in the Department of Parks, Recreation and Tourism Management, Clemson University, USA. He has a strong background in desktop GIS focused on spatial analytics and implementation of GIS enterprise systems. His past efforts include the development... Read More →


Tuesday May 17, 2016 14:45 - 15:30
Giraffe 254

16:00

Mapping Risks and Opportunities of Climate Change to Subsistence Farmers
Limited Capacity seats available

One of the main socioeconomic activities practiced in Eastern Africa, and at large Sub-Saharan Africa, is crop farming. Crop farming is regarded as weather sensitive, especially on the cultivation of staple crops which are highly relied upon by subsistence farmers. In the light of climate change, staple crop farming faces both challenges and also opportunities due to their entire reliance on climate conditions (rainfall and temperature). The study explores an approach to identify the risks and opportunities of climate change to subsistence farmers through vulnerability assessment using Geo-information technology in four Eastern Africa countries: Ethiopia, Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda. The vulnerability assessment adopts the start point approach (Benjamin et al., 2011), by using spatial multi-criteria evalution on 3 proxy determinants: Exposure (of stable crops to climate change); sensitivity (of farmers to climate change); and coping capacity (of farmers to climate change), to identify areas at risk and areas of opportunity in the presence of climate change.

Speakers
avatar for Peter Mwangi

Peter Mwangi

Proffesional Associate, African Biodiveristy Conservation and Innovation Centre
Over 10 years' experience in Geospatial technology with focus on natural resource monitoring and assessment with wide range of experience working with NGOs and international organizations on a number of published projects such as the Elephant Database, Mapping Risks and Opportunities... Read More →



Tuesday May 17, 2016 16:00 - 16:45
Giraffe 254

16:00

Participatory GIS (pGIS) for Community Resilience
Limited Capacity full

In 2013, Typhoon Haiyan caused catastrophic damage in Eastern Leyte, Philippines. With no early warning systems in place, 315 km/h sustained winds and 20 ft. storm surges took many residents' lives and property. Catholic Relief Services (CRS) initiated the Planning for Resilience and Effective Preparedness (PREP) project in two Haiyan-affected municipalities which have high risks of flooding and/or storm surge. Participatory mapping builds community capacity to address climate-related hazards that threaten their wellbeing. Government disaster risk maps do not usually include the voices of the frontlines, particularly the most vulnerable, and often rely on outdated data. Community voices add valuable specificity and relevance for use in more effective disaster risk reduction planning at all levels.
In the Philippines, there is a high level of technological literacy; the majority of adults and youth have the capacity to use smart phones and applications. CRS introduced an easy-to-use, customized mobile application named ArcGIS Collector, for community members to plot key infrastructures, evacuation centers, hazards, and risk. pGIS revolutionizes risk mapping from normally hand-drawn maps to high quality GIS maps. These digital maps are stored in the cloud preventing damage/loss during storms. These maps are now the primary information base that help local governments design inclusive evacuation routes/centers, effective early warning systems, and preposition relief goods.

Speakers
avatar for Janeen Kim Cayetano

Janeen Kim Cayetano

Geographic Information Systems Analyst, Catholic Relief Services
Janeen Kim Cayetano is a graduate of BS Geography at the University of the Philippines. She currently works as a GIS Analyst at Catholic Relief Services based in the Philippines providing remote GIS support to CRS programs worldwide. Also serves as a key member of the ICT4D community... Read More →
avatar for Ian Carlo Zuñiga

Ian Carlo Zuñiga

GIS Specialist, Catholic Relief Services
Ian Carlo Zuñiga is currently a GIS specialist for Catholic Relief Services-Philippines in Eastern Samar. His work there involves empowering various communities through the use of maps and building their capacity in disaster risk reduction and management. Aside from engaging in DRRM... Read More →



Tuesday May 17, 2016 16:00 - 16:45
Giraffe 252

16:45

Mapping Risks and Opportunities of Climate Change to Subsistence Farmers
Limited Capacity seats available

One of the main socioeconomic activities practiced in Eastern Africa, and at large Sub-Saharan Africa, is crop farming. Crop farming is regarded as weather sensitive, especially on the cultivation of staple crops which are highly relied upon by subsistence farmers. In the light of climate change, staple crop farming faces both challenges and also opportunities due to their entire reliance on climate conditions (rainfall and temperature). The study explores an approach to identify the risks and opportunities of climate change to subsistence farmers through vulnerability assessment using Geo-information technology in four Eastern Africa countries: Ethiopia, Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda. The vulnerability assessment approach adopts the start point approach, pressure-and-release (PAR) model, by Benjamin et al. (2011) using 3 proxy determinants: Exposure (of stable crops to climate change); sensitivity (of farmers to climate change); and coping capacity (of farmer to climate change), to identify areas at risk and areas of opportunity in the presence of climate change.

Speakers
avatar for Peter Mwangi

Peter Mwangi

Proffesional Associate, African Biodiveristy Conservation and Innovation Centre
Over 10 years' experience in Geospatial technology with focus on natural resource monitoring and assessment with wide range of experience working with NGOs and international organizations on a number of published projects such as the Elephant Database, Mapping Risks and Opportunities... Read More →



Tuesday May 17, 2016 16:45 - 17:30
Giraffe 254

16:45

Participatory GIS (pGIS) for Community Resilience
Limited Capacity full

In 2013, Typhoon Haiyan caused catastrophic damage in Eastern Leyte, Philippines. With no early warning systems in place, 315 km/h sustained winds and 20 ft. storm surges took many residents' lives and property. Catholic Relief Services (CRS) initiated the Planning for Resilience and Effective Preparedness (PREP) project in two Haiyan-affected municipalities which have high risks of flooding and/or storm surge. Participatory mapping builds community capacity to address climate-related hazards that threaten their wellbeing. Government disaster risk maps do not usually include the voices of the frontlines, particularly the most vulnerable, and often rely on outdated data. Community voices add valuable specificity and relevance for use in more effective disaster risk reduction planning at all levels.
In the Philippines, there is a high level of technological literacy; the majority of adults and youth have the capacity to use smart phones and applications. CRS introduced an easy-to-use, customized mobile application named ArcGIS Collector, for community members to plot key infrastructures, evacuation centers, hazards, and risk. pGIS revolutionizes risk mapping from normally hand-drawn maps to high quality GIS maps. These digital maps are stored in the cloud preventing damage/loss during storms. These maps are now the primary information base that help local governments design inclusive evacuation routes/centers, effective early warning systems, and preposition relief goods.

Speakers
avatar for Janeen Kim Cayetano

Janeen Kim Cayetano

Geographic Information Systems Analyst, Catholic Relief Services
Janeen Kim Cayetano is a graduate of BS Geography at the University of the Philippines. She currently works as a GIS Analyst at Catholic Relief Services based in the Philippines providing remote GIS support to CRS programs worldwide. Also serves as a key member of the ICT4D community... Read More →
avatar for Ian Carlo Zuñiga

Ian Carlo Zuñiga

GIS Specialist, Catholic Relief Services
Ian Carlo Zuñiga is currently a GIS specialist for Catholic Relief Services-Philippines in Eastern Samar. His work there involves empowering various communities through the use of maps and building their capacity in disaster risk reduction and management. Aside from engaging in DRRM... Read More →



Tuesday May 17, 2016 16:45 - 17:30
Giraffe 252
 
Wednesday, May 18
 

10:45

Monitoring, Evaluating and Improving the Effectiveness of Wildlife Protection with SMART (2 Hours)
Limited Capacity seats available

SMART (Spatial Monitoring And Reporting Tool) is designed to help monitoring Antipoaching patrols. Its combination of software, emphasis on capacity building and best practices will provide local protected area and wildlife authorities and community groups the ability to empower staff, boost motivation, increase efficiency and promote credible and transparent monitoring of the effectiveness of anti-poaching efforts.

SMART accomplishes this by being inexpensive, more adaptive and intuitive to use, and with more advanced analysis and reporting functions that other monitoring technologies now in use. SMART incorporates intelligence gathering as well as patrol data, and it uses innovative ways to better aid conservation managers in strategic planning of enforcement activities. Most importantly, SMART is easy to use. 

If you are a wildlife protection organization, learn how you or your organization can get involved and how you can make SMART work for you, it has for us and we are happy to share experiences, challenges and lessons learned.

This session is tailored to introduce you to SMART, give you a historic background of it's development, guide you to set up the database, and practice with you on how to collect data for SMART. By the end of this session I show you a few real-life examples of SMART-in-action.

It's time to get SMART about conservation. 

Speakers
avatar for Sam Shaba

Sam Shaba

Innovation, Monitoring and Evaluation, Honeyguide Foundation
Sam Shaba is a BSc Wildlife Management graduate of Sokoine University (SUA), class of 2011. | | After school Sam has worked for World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF) as a field research coordinator for a Greenhouse Gases Monitoring project under MICCA programme (Mitigation of Climate... Read More →



Wednesday May 18, 2016 10:45 - 12:50
Lioness

13:50

Monitoring, Evaluating and Improving the Effectiveness of Wildlife Protection with SMART (2 Hours)
Limited Capacity seats available

SMART (Spatial Monitoring And Reporting Tool) is designed to help monitoring Antipoaching patrols. Its combination of software, emphasis on capacity building and best practices will provide local protected area and wildlife authorities and community groups the ability to empower staff, boost motivation, increase efficiency and promote credible and transparent monitoring of the effectiveness of anti-poaching efforts.

SMART accomplishes this by being inexpensive, more adaptive and intuitive to use, and with more advanced analysis and reporting functions that other monitoring technologies now in use. SMART incorporates intelligence gathering as well as patrol data, and it uses innovative ways to better aid conservation managers in strategic planning of enforcement activities. Most importantly, SMART is easy to use. 

If you are a wildlife protection organization, learn how you or your organization can get involved and how you can make SMART work for you, it has for us and we are happy to share experiences, challenges and lessons learned.

This session is tailored to introduce you to SMART, give you a historic background of it's development, guide you to set up the database, and practice with you on how to collect data for SMART. By the end of this session I show you a few real-life examples of SMART-in-action.

It's time to get SMART about conservation. 

Speakers
avatar for Sam Shaba

Sam Shaba

Innovation, Monitoring and Evaluation, Honeyguide Foundation
Sam Shaba is a BSc Wildlife Management graduate of Sokoine University (SUA), class of 2011. | | After school Sam has worked for World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF) as a field research coordinator for a Greenhouse Gases Monitoring project under MICCA programme (Mitigation of Climate... Read More →



Wednesday May 18, 2016 13:50 - 16:00
Lioness
 
Thursday, May 19
 

10:45

Early Warning System Can Save Life and Reduce Loss and Damages: Experiences of Sirajganj, Bangladesh
Limited Capacity seats available

Bangladesh is vulnerable to natural disasters like flood and riverbank erosion, cyclone, tidal surge and drought. Practical Action, Bangladesh has been working to strengthen ability of poor people to use technology to cope with threats from natural disasters, environmental degradation. Thus, it focuses on improving vulnerable communities' ability to prepare for natural disasters, to survive and rebuild lives and livelihoods after disasters. The project "From Vulnerability to Resilience: Capitalizing on Public Investments (V2R+) has been supporting early warning dissemination through "mobile phone based voice message" and applying "Information (both Digital and Manual) Board". This paper bases on findings of an impact assessment of early warning system which was carried out after the flood (hit in monsoon 2015). The objectives of the assessment were threefold; firstly to understand the effectiveness of early warning system, secondly, to measure impact of EWS on flood vulnerable people and finally to explore how EWS can be further improved. The assessment applied qualitative approaches like key informant interview (KII) and Focus Group Discussion (FGD) for data collection. Four FGDs have been conducted where 32 (F-21, M-11) peoples were present (representing 7075 Household of the community). KII was conducted with 4 community volunteers, 3 entrepreneurs of Union Digital Centres, 2 Chairman of Union Parishad. Moreover, 7 Case studies were also collected. Findings demonstrate that out of the 7075 HHs, 681 HHs (10%) shifted on high land during flood with their movable assets, materials and cattle, 421 HHs (6%) raised shelter (cot), 180 HHs (3%) made portable cooker, 602 HHs (9%) performed late sowing/early harvest of crops, 84 (1%) HHs raised cattle plinth and 5107 (71%) HHs observed daily flood situation for deciding next course of action. The assessment unveils that ICT based information dissemination has been very effective in building flood resilient community in Sirajganj, Bangladesh.

Speakers
avatar for Md Mokhlesur Rahman

Md Mokhlesur Rahman

Manager- M&E and Impact Assessment, Practical Action, Bangladesh
Mr. Mokhlesur works with Practical Action, Bangladesh as Manager- M&E and Impact Assessment. Prior to that he also worked with Save the Children, D.Net, BRAC International. Countries of work experiences include Bangladesh, India, Pakistan, Afghanistan & The Netherlands. He also served... Read More →


Thursday May 19, 2016 10:45 - 11:30
Giraffe 252

10:45

Flood Early Warning System in Nepal
Limited Capacity seats available

In Nepal, each year floods and landslides cause deaths of about 300 people and economic loss of over 1 billion NPR on average. Floods in Kailali had claimed lives of 26 people in 2008. Similarly, in Kanchanpur, flood took the lives of 14 people in 2008 and 3 in 2009. After EWS came into function in Kailali in 2009 with a collaborative effort of Department of Hydrology and Meteorology (DHM), community disaster management committees, local government and non-governmental organizations, there have been deaths of 1 person in 2009 and 3 in 2014 due to flood. Similarly, in Kanchanpur, official records mention the death of only 2 persons  after establishment of EWS in 2011. DHM's records show the magnitude and scale of rainfall and river level after EWS establishment is at least similar and even larger compared to the records prior to EWS establishment. This is supported by community and district authorities' opinion.
In the recent years, to add value to CBEWS, the use of GIS based scientific models for hazard/vulnerability mapping; telemetric systems to monitor real time rainfall and river levels; use of media, websites, android mobile applications, software like frontline and voicent to send group text and voice messages to target groups have been introduced in Kailali and Kanchanpur. Thus, despite majority of area being Flash Flood prone, EWS has shown a huge potential for genuine, cost-effective and meaningful means to avoid human and material loss due to flooding.

Speakers
avatar for Dinee Tamang

Dinee Tamang

Research Advisor, Mercy Corps
Dinee Tamang is a Research Advisor working in Mercy Corps Nepal. | He has more than three years of experience in working with GIS in the field of NRM, DRM and Urban Planning.



Thursday May 19, 2016 10:45 - 11:30
Giraffe 253

11:30

Early Warning System Can Save Life and Reduce Loss and Damages: Experiences of Sirajganj, Bangladesh
Limited Capacity seats available

Bangladesh is vulnerable to natural disasters like flood and riverbank erosion, cyclone, tidal surge and drought. Practical Action, Bangladesh has been working to strengthen ability of poor people to use technology to cope with threats from natural disasters, environmental degradation. Thus, it focuses on improving vulnerable communities' ability to prepare for natural disasters, to survive and rebuild lives and livelihoods after disasters. The project "From Vulnerability to Resilience: Capitalizing on Public Investments (V2R+) has been supporting early warning dissemination through "mobile phone based voice message" and applying "Information (both Digital and Manual) Board". This paper bases on findings of an impact assessment of early warning system which was carried out after the flood (hit in monsoon 2015). The objectives of the assessment were threefold; firstly to understand the effectiveness of early warning system, secondly, to measure impact of EWS on flood vulnerable people and finally to explore how EWS can be further improved. The assessment applied qualitative approaches like key informant interview (KII) and Focus Group Discussion (FGD) for data collection. Four FGDs have been conducted where 32 (F-21, M-11) peoples were present (representing 7075 Household of the community). KII was conducted with 4 community volunteers, 3 entrepreneurs of Union Digital Centres, 2 Chairman of Union Parishad. Moreover, 7 Case studies were also collected. Findings demonstrate that out of the 7075 HHs, 681 HHs (10%) shifted on high land during flood with their movable assets, materials and cattle, 421 HHs (6%) raised shelter (cot), 180 HHs (3%) made portable cooker, 602 HHs (9%) performed late sowing/early harvest of crops, 84 (1%) HHs raised cattle plinth and 5107 (71%) HHs observed daily flood situation for deciding next course of action. The assessment unveils that ICT based information dissemination has been very effective in building flood resilient community in Sirajganj, Bangladesh.

Speakers
avatar for Md Mokhlesur Rahman

Md Mokhlesur Rahman

Manager- M&E and Impact Assessment, Practical Action, Bangladesh
Mr. Mokhlesur works with Practical Action, Bangladesh as Manager- M&E and Impact Assessment. Prior to that he also worked with Save the Children, D.Net, BRAC International. Countries of work experiences include Bangladesh, India, Pakistan, Afghanistan & The Netherlands. He also served... Read More →


Thursday May 19, 2016 11:30 - 12:15
Giraffe 252

11:30

Flood Early Warning System in Nepal
Limited Capacity seats available

In Nepal, each year floods and landslides cause deaths of about 300 people and economic loss of over 1 billion NPR on average. Floods in Kailali had claimed lives of 26 people in 2008. Similarly, in Kanchanpur, flood took the lives of 14 people in 2008 and 3 in 2009. After EWS came into function in Kailali in 2009 with a collaborative effort of Department of Hydrology and Meteorology (DHM), community disaster management committees, local government and non-governmental organizations, there have been deaths of 1 person in 2009 and 3 in 2014 due to flood. Similarly, in Kanchanpur, official records mention the death of 2 persons only after establishment of EWS in 2011. DHM's records show the magnitude and scale of rainfall and river level after EWS establishment is at least similar and even larger compared to the records prior to EWS establishment. This is supported by community and district authorities' opinion.
In the recent years, to add value to CBEWS, the use of GIS based scientific models for hazard/vulnerability mapping; telemetric systems to monitor real time rainfall and river levels; use of media, websites, android mobile applications, software like frontline and voicent to send group text and voice messages to target groups have been introduced in Kailali and Kanchanpur. Thus, despite majority of area being Flash Flood prone, EWS has shown a huge potential for genuine, cost-effective and meaningful means to avoid human and material loss due to flooding.

Speakers
avatar for Dinee Tamang

Dinee Tamang

Research Advisor, Mercy Corps
Dinee Tamang is a Research Advisor working in Mercy Corps Nepal. | He has more than three years of experience in working with GIS in the field of NRM, DRM and Urban Planning.



Thursday May 19, 2016 11:30 - 12:15
Giraffe 253

12:15

Early Warning System Can Save Life and Reduce Loss and Damages: Experiences of Sirajganj, Bangladesh
Limited Capacity seats available

Bangladesh is vulnerable to natural disasters like flood and riverbank erosion, cyclone, tidal surge and drought. Practical Action, Bangladesh has been working to strengthen ability of poor people to use technology to cope with threats from natural disasters, environmental degradation. Thus, it focuses on improving vulnerable communities' ability to prepare for natural disasters, to survive and rebuild lives and livelihoods after disasters. The project "From Vulnerability to Resilience: Capitalizing on Public Investments (V2R+) has been supporting early warning dissemination through "mobile phone based voice message" and applying "Information (both Digital and Manual) Board". This paper bases on findings of an impact assessment of early warning system which was carried out after the flood (hit in monsoon 2015). The objectives of the assessment were threefold; firstly to understand the effectiveness of early warning system, secondly, to measure impact of EWS on flood vulnerable people and finally to explore how EWS can be further improved. The assessment applied qualitative approaches like key informant interview (KII) and Focus Group Discussion (FGD) for data collection. Four FGDs have been conducted where 32 (F-21, M-11) peoples were present (representing 7075 Household of the community). KII was conducted with 4 community volunteers, 3 entrepreneurs of Union Digital Centres, 2 Chairman of Union Parishad. Moreover, 7 Case studies were also collected. Findings demonstrate that out of the 7075 HHs, 681 HHs (10%) shifted on high land during flood with their movable assets, materials and cattle, 421 HHs (6%) raised shelter (cot), 180 HHs (3%) made portable cooker, 602 HHs (9%) performed late sowing/early harvest of crops, 84 (1%) HHs raised cattle plinth and 5107 (71%) HHs observed daily flood situation for deciding next course of action. The assessment unveils that ICT based information dissemination has been very effective in building flood resilient community in Sirajganj, Bangladesh.

Speakers
avatar for Md Mokhlesur Rahman

Md Mokhlesur Rahman

Manager- M&E and Impact Assessment, Practical Action, Bangladesh
Mr. Mokhlesur works with Practical Action, Bangladesh as Manager- M&E and Impact Assessment. Prior to that he also worked with Save the Children, D.Net, BRAC International. Countries of work experiences include Bangladesh, India, Pakistan, Afghanistan & The Netherlands. He also served... Read More →


Thursday May 19, 2016 12:15 - 13:00
Giraffe 252

12:15

Flood Early Warning System in Nepal
Limited Capacity seats available

In Nepal, each year floods and landslides cause deaths of about 300 people and economic loss of over 1 billion NPR on average. Floods in Kailali had claimed lives of 26 people in 2008. Similarly, in Kanchanpur, flood took the lives of 14 people in 2008 and 3 in 2009. After EWS came into function in Kailali in 2009 with a collaborative effort of Department of Hydrology and Meteorology (DHM), community disaster management committees, local government and non-governmental organizations, there have been deaths of 1 person in 2009 and 3 in 2014 due to flood. Similarly, in Kanchanpur, official records mention the death of 2 persons only after establishment of EWS in 2011. DHM's records show the magnitude and scale of rainfall and river level after EWS establishment is at least similar and even larger compared to the records prior to EWS establishment. This is supported by community and district authorities' opinion.
In the recent years, to add value to CBEWS, the use of GIS based scientific models for hazard/vulnerability mapping; telemetric systems to monitor real time rainfall and river levels; use of media, websites, android mobile applications, software like frontline and voicent to send group text and voice messages to target groups have been introduced in Kailali and Kanchanpur. Thus, despite majority of area being Flash Flood prone, EWS has shown a huge potential for genuine, cost-effective and meaningful means to avoid human and material loss due to flooding.

Speakers
avatar for Dinee Tamang

Dinee Tamang

Research Advisor, Mercy Corps
Dinee Tamang is a Research Advisor working in Mercy Corps Nepal. | He has more than three years of experience in working with GIS in the field of NRM, DRM and Urban Planning.



Thursday May 19, 2016 12:15 - 13:00
Giraffe 253

14:00

Business Model Innovation for Conservation
Limited Capacity seats available

Financial barriers limit the application of technology for conservation. Conservation organizations cannot afford it, and technology organizations can't make money off it. Business model innovation, more than technology innovation is what is really needed for large scale tech implementations in conservation. There have been few revenue generating models outside of eco tourism for conservation. Though they give us access to hundreds of millions of people, we have only used the web and social media for the purposes of getting donations. We need to look through the lens of the public and their needs and define offerings accordingly. The private sector already does this well, and we can learn from their thinking. Internet of Elephants is using games, social casinos, data visualizations to appeal to the public's desire for status, competition, quantification, and love. If we can tap into these addictions, we can democratize nature for the masses and generate revenue needed to widely implement tech solutions.

Speakers
avatar for Gautam Shah

Gautam Shah

Founder, Internet of Elephants
Gautam Shah is the founder of Internet of Elephants, a social enterprise using advances in technology to connect people with wild animals and create profitable business models for conservation. He was previously an IT consultant for Accenture for 20 years working in both the commercial... Read More →


Thursday May 19, 2016 14:00 - 14:45
Giraffe 252

14:00

GIS: Facilitating Wide-Ranging Conservation Goals
Limited Capacity filling up

East Africa parks and conservation areas are under increasing threats that affect both short-term and long-term management goals. These threats include climate change, resource extraction, poaching and socio-economic pressures. There exists a critical need to grow the capacity of geospatial technologies for park and conservation area management in East Africa. These technologies can improve information and data gathering, generation, analysis and sharing that will translate into improved management strategies and on the ground implementation. Clemson University Parks, Recreation and Tourism management researchers over the past two years have built partnerships with conservation and government agencies in Tanzania, Kenya and Rwanda to address these threats through improved management capacities founded in-part on the implementation of proposed geospatial technologies. These efforts are cross-cutting including 1) GIS training; 2) mobile app development to enhance the tourism experience and improve visitor management; 3) geospatial infrastructure to improve stakeholder engagement; 4) assisting with grant writing and identifying funding opportunities; and 5) development of strategic GIS plans. This presentation will focus on these efforts and provide an opportunity to discuss limitations and success of this engagement and partnership model.

Speakers
avatar for Dr. David White

Dr. David White

Research Assistant Professor/Chief Science and Technology Officer, Clemson Center for Geospatial Technologies, Clemson University
Dr. White is a Research Assistant Professor in the Department of Parks, Recreation and Tourism Management, Clemson University, USA. He has a strong background in desktop GIS focused on spatial analytics and implementation of GIS enterprise systems. His past efforts include the development... Read More →


Thursday May 19, 2016 14:00 - 14:45
Giraffe 253

14:45

Business Model Innovation for Conservation
Limited Capacity seats available

Financial barriers limit the application of technology for conservation. Conservation organizations cannot afford it, and technology organizations can't make money off it. Business model innovation, more than technology innovation is what is really needed for large scale tech implementations in conservation. There have been few revenue generating models outside of eco tourism for conservation. Though they give us access to hundreds of millions of people, we have only used the web and social media for the purposes of getting donations. We need to look through the lens of the public and their needs and define offerings accordingly. The private sector already does this well, and we can learn from their thinking. Internet of Elephants is using games, social casinos, data visualizations to appeal to the public's desire for status, competition, quantification, and love. If we can tap into these addictions, we can democratize nature for the masses and generate revenue needed to widely implement tech solutions.

Speakers
avatar for Gautam Shah

Gautam Shah

Founder, Internet of Elephants
Gautam Shah is the founder of Internet of Elephants, a social enterprise using advances in technology to connect people with wild animals and create profitable business models for conservation. He was previously an IT consultant for Accenture for 20 years working in both the commercial... Read More →


Thursday May 19, 2016 14:45 - 15:30
Giraffe 252

14:45

GIS: Facilitating Wide-Ranging Conservation Goals
Limited Capacity seats available

East Africa parks and conservation areas are under increasing threats that affect both short-term and long-term management goals. These threats include climate change, resource extraction, poaching and socio-economic pressures. There exists a critical need to grow the capacity of geospatial technologies for park and conservation area management in East Africa. These technologies can improve information and data gathering, generation, analysis and sharing that will translate into improved management strategies and on the ground implementation. Clemson University Parks, Recreation and Tourism management researchers over the past two years have built partnerships with conservation and government agencies in Tanzania, Kenya and Rwanda to address these threats through improved management capacities founded in-part on the implementation of proposed geospatial technologies. These efforts are cross-cutting including 1) GIS training; 2) mobile app development to enhance the tourism experience and improve visitor management; 3) geospatial infrastructure to improve stakeholder engagement; 4) assisting with grant writing and identifying funding opportunities; and 5) development of strategic GIS plans. This presentation will focus on these efforts and provide an opportunity to discuss limitations and success of this engagement and partnership model.

Speakers
avatar for Dr. David White

Dr. David White

Research Assistant Professor/Chief Science and Technology Officer, Clemson Center for Geospatial Technologies, Clemson University
Dr. White is a Research Assistant Professor in the Department of Parks, Recreation and Tourism Management, Clemson University, USA. He has a strong background in desktop GIS focused on spatial analytics and implementation of GIS enterprise systems. His past efforts include the development... Read More →


Thursday May 19, 2016 14:45 - 15:30
Giraffe 253