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The annual ICT4D Conferences have proven to be an invaluable opportunity for NGOs, private sector organizations, universities, governmental agencies and foundations to share their experience in using ICT to increase the impact of development programs and to learn from each other.  In 2016, 715 individuals from 76 countries and 301 private sector and public sector and civil society explored the ways to harness the full power of digital solutions to achieve the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals.  Our thanks to Accenture, Catholic Relief Services, Esri, Hewlett Packard Enterprise, iMerit Technology Services, Inmarsat, IS Solutions, Making All Voices Count, Mercy Corps, Microsoft, NetHope, Oxfam, Pandexio, Qualcom Wireless Reach, RTI International, SimbaNet and World Vision for making that possible.

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05- Disaster Relief [clear filter]
Monday, May 16
 

10:45

Last Mile Mobile Solutions, Digitizing Humanitarian Assistance Delivery
Limited Capacity full

LMMS is a stand-alone system that uses web-based mobile applications to better manage responses to disasters. The system enables digital registration of affected populations and automates how aid-agencies delivery humanitarian services, resulting in more effective, efficient and fully accountable practices. LMMS improves the effectiveness and efficiency of registration, distribution and project management while increasing accountability to both beneficiaries and donors. In a nutshell it automates business processes in digital software enabling humanitarian workers achieve their goals in a faster and more efficient way.
LMMS is developed by World Vision International for the humanitarian Industry and as such is currently used by over ten (10) International NGOs including UN agencies in over 25 countries.
LMMS is currently used by multiple humanitarian agencies; with diverse user groups including rapid emergency staff who handle human displacements, earthquakes, typhoons and other such responses; the capability to implement cash and electronic credit transfers in addition to managing the dispersal of traditional relief aid items; the capability to leverage modern technological advancements from cheaper smartphone devices to Cloud-based infrastructure for deploying centralized versions of the system
Today, LMMS is being used in urban and rural contexts, in refugee camps and in more settled communities. The system is being used under a variety of architectures ranging from multiple remote server deployments to consolidated servers being used by multiple agencies and local governments working together.
LMMS can work on most consumer grade devices running Android OS, which are easy to get and much cheaper than commercial grade devices. The system can import and export data from and into other systems thus enhancing data sharing and integration of systems.
For more information kindly check out the following links / videos
http://www.lastmilemobilesolutions.com
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iNS8OFE2s30
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qZKMV34Dh4g
http://www.ncciraq.org/en/ngos/activities/item/10371-world-vision-lmms-technology-speeds-up-registration-of-3,000-displaced-families-in-iraq
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BNP3Mi1yzi8



Speakers
avatar for Paul Mwirichia

Paul Mwirichia

Food Assistance Information & Reporting Technical Specialist, World Vision International
Professional Training: BSC Information Technology, MBA (currently in research development) Paul Mwirichia has a strong IT background and has for the last 10 years been involved in Information Technology in the sectors of education, Tea trade and the humanitarian industry. He has been... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 10:45 - 11:30
Giraffe 259

10:45

Test the ELAN Data Management and Protection Starter Kit
Limited Capacity seats available

Do you find data management and protection challenges daunting? Want to comply with data protection principles but don't know where to start? Find policies delightful but wonder what you can do today? Come explore the Electronic Cash Transfer Learning Action Network's (ELAN's) Data Management and Protection Starter Kit. Learn what the kit contains and how it can help field staff understand and take first steps toward responsibly managing data. The starter kit includes practical guidance on assessing data risks, minimizing data collection, understanding KYC requirements, registering beneficiaries, understanding encryption, sharing data and de-identification and disposal.
The session will focus on field data management challenges and supporting teams to take first steps toward improving data practices and it will offer participants the chance to share their learning in this area. We'll also take your feedback about if you think it could use some improvements.
Note: The starter kit was created with electronic cash transfer programs in mind, but it may be useful to other programs.

Speakers
avatar for Lily Frey

Lily Frey

Electronic Cash Transfer Officer, Electronic Cash Transfer Learning Action Network (ELAN)
Lily supports the Electronic Cash Transfer Learning Action Network (ELAN), which seeks to improve the effectiveness and impact of humanitarian cash transfer programs through the appropriate use of payments technology. Lily has led work on assessing mobile money partnership choices... Read More →



Monday May 16, 2016 10:45 - 11:30
Giraffe 258

11:30

Last Mile Mobile Solutions, Digitizing Humanitarian Assistance Delivery
Limited Capacity full

LMMS is a stand-alone system that uses web-based mobile applications to better manage responses to disasters. The system enables digital registration of affected populations and automates how aid-agencies delivery humanitarian services, resulting in more effective, efficient and fully accountable practices. LMMS improves the effectiveness and efficiency of registration, distribution and project management while increasing accountability to both beneficiaries and donors. In a nutshell it automates business processes in digital software enabling humanitarian workers achieve their goals in a faster and more efficient way.
LMMS is developed by World Vision International for the humanitarian Industry and as such is currently used by over ten (10) International NGOs including UN agencies in over 25 countries.
LMMS is currently used by multiple humanitarian agencies; with diverse user groups including rapid emergency staff who handle human displacements, earthquakes, typhoons and other such responses; the capability to implement cash and electronic credit transfers in addition to managing the dispersal of traditional relief aid items; the capability to leverage modern technological advancements from cheaper smartphone devices to Cloud-based infrastructure for deploying centralized versions of the system
Today, LMMS is being used in urban and rural contexts, in refugee camps and in more settled communities. The system is being used under a variety of architectures ranging from multiple remote server deployments to consolidated servers being used by multiple agencies and local governments working together.
LMMS can work on most consumer grade devices running Android OS, which are easy to get and much cheaper than commercial grade devices. The system can import and export data from and into other systems thus enhancing data sharing and integration of systems.
For more information kindly check out the following links / videos
http://www.lastmilemobilesolutions.com
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iNS8OFE2s30
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qZKMV34Dh4g
http://www.ncciraq.org/en/ngos/activities/item/10371-world-vision-lmms-technology-speeds-up-registration-of-3,000-displaced-families-in-iraq
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BNP3Mi1yzi8



Speakers
avatar for Paul Mwirichia

Paul Mwirichia

Food Assistance Information & Reporting Technical Specialist, World Vision International
Professional Training: BSC Information Technology, MBA (currently in research development) Paul Mwirichia has a strong IT background and has for the last 10 years been involved in Information Technology in the sectors of education, Tea trade and the humanitarian industry. He has been... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 11:30 - 12:15
Giraffe 259

11:30

Test the ELAN Data Management and Protection Starter Kit
Limited Capacity seats available

Do you find data management and protection challenges daunting? Want to comply with data protection principles but don't know where to start? Find policies delightful but wonder what you can do today? Come explore the Electronic Cash Transfer Learning Action Network's (ELAN's) Data Management and Protection Starter Kit. Learn what the kit contains and how it can help field staff understand and take first steps toward responsibly managing data. The starter kit includes practical guidance on assessing data risks, minimizing data collection, understanding KYC requirements, registering beneficiaries, understanding encryption, sharing data and de-identification and disposal.
The session will focus on field data management challenges and supporting teams to take first steps toward improving data practices and it will offer participants the chance to share their learning in this area. We'll also take your feedback about if you think it could use some improvements.
Note: The starter kit was created with electronic cash transfer programs in mind, but it may be useful to other programs.

Speakers
avatar for Lily Frey

Lily Frey

Electronic Cash Transfer Officer, Electronic Cash Transfer Learning Action Network (ELAN)
Lily supports the Electronic Cash Transfer Learning Action Network (ELAN), which seeks to improve the effectiveness and impact of humanitarian cash transfer programs through the appropriate use of payments technology. Lily has led work on assessing mobile money partnership choices... Read More →



Monday May 16, 2016 11:30 - 12:15
Giraffe 258

12:15

Big to Small: Radio and Mobile for Achieving SDGs
Limited Capacity full

This joint panel session will introduce the audience to the combination of mass media and interactive mobile technology for increased engagement to empower communities with a two-way stream of information. Equal Access will describe their programs on countering violent extremism in Chad, Niger and Burkina Faso, and on combating gender-based violence in Nepal. Farm Radio International will discuss how Interactive Participatory Radio Programming can effectively serve farmers with relevant information that can improve their yields. VOTO will discuss IVR as a technology tool through the case studies of Equal Access and Farm Radio, with the aim of guiding audiences on the potential of mobile technology as a tool to achieve the SDGs.

Equal Access International is dedicated to creating positive change for underserved people by combining innovative media programming with direct community engagement activities to inform, educate, and inspire communities. Farm Radio International works with more than 500 radio partners in 38 African countries to fight poverty and food insecurity by broadcasting content that serves the interests of small-scale farmers. Lastly, VOTO Mobile enables organizations anywhere in the world to use a combination of mobile technologies such Interactive Voice Response (IVR), SMS and USSD to design, pilot and scale interactive mobile programs with a focus on amplifying the voices of the underheard and underserved.

Moderators
avatar for Neema Iyer

Neema Iyer

Regional Director of Programs, VOTO Mobile
Neema is the Regional Director of Programs for East Africa at VOTO Mobile. She works with various partners to design and implement M4D projects across health, agriculture, governance, energy and education, using interactive mobile technologies such as SMS, IVR and USSD. With a background... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Natasha Beale

Natasha Beale

ICT4D Specialist, Equal Access International
Natasha is the ICT4D Specialist at Equal Access International where she specializes in the intersection between technology and development. She has managed a range of ICT4D projects in a variety of sectors from maternal and child health to education system strengthening as well as... Read More →
avatar for Nuwaha Viola

Nuwaha Viola

ICT Officer/Developer, Farm Radio International
Viola Nuwaha is an ICT Officer/Developer for Farm Radio International Uganda Office. She is responsible for training and empowering broadcasters on how best they can fuse technology in the presentation of radio shows and other programs to ensure an efficient dual conversational framework... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 12:15 - 13:00
Giraffe 259

12:15

Test the ELAN Data Management and Protection Starter Kit
Limited Capacity seats available

Do you find data management and protection challenges daunting? Want to comply with data protection principles but don't know where to start? Find policies delightful but wonder what you can do today? Come explore the Electronic Cash Transfer Learning Action Network's (ELAN's) Data Management and Protection Starter Kit. Learn what the kit contains and how it can help field staff understand and take first steps toward responsibly managing data. The starter kit includes practical guidance on assessing data risks, minimizing data collection, understanding KYC requirements, registering beneficiaries, understanding encryption, sharing data and de-identification and disposal.
The session will focus on field data management challenges and supporting teams to take first steps toward improving data practices and it will offer participants the chance to share their learning in this area. We'll also take your feedback about if you think it could use some improvements.
Note: The starter kit was created with electronic cash transfer programs in mind, but it may be useful to other programs.

Speakers
avatar for Lily Frey

Lily Frey

Electronic Cash Transfer Officer, Electronic Cash Transfer Learning Action Network (ELAN)
Lily supports the Electronic Cash Transfer Learning Action Network (ELAN), which seeks to improve the effectiveness and impact of humanitarian cash transfer programs through the appropriate use of payments technology. Lily has led work on assessing mobile money partnership choices... Read More →



Monday May 16, 2016 12:15 - 13:00
Giraffe 258

14:00

Integrated Approach to Beneficiary Needs Assessment and Case Management
Limited Capacity seats available

The Syrian crisis is now in its fifth year and Jordan is hosting some 625,000 Syrians refugees – most of them arrived in Jordan in the first 2-3 years since the outbreak of the war. The vast majority of Syrian refugees – over 500,000 – are living in Jordanian cities and rural communities, outside of camps. Thanks to the generosity of the Jordanian government and its people, a substantial international and national humanitarian aid effort and the initiatives of the refugees themselves, humanitarian standards were met for most refugees. Now, five years into the crisis the capacity of Jordanian communities to host refugees has become severely stretched. Having recognized that this protracted emergency requires a different approach, humanitarian agencies are now adopting a dual response: on one hand they are focusing on strengthening the resilience of refugees and their Jordanian hosting communities and on the other hand they are increasingly focused on ensuring that assistance is delivered in an efficient and effective way and on targeting the most vulnerable of households among refugees and Jordanians in hosting communities. All this requires increased coordination and synchronization between aid organizations. To facilitate this, a UNHCR-led initiative (supported by a steering committee of major aid agencies operating in Jordan) developed a framework aimed at assessing the vulnerability of refugees: universally and for each sector – basic needs, food security, shelter, health, education and WASH. Operating in this environment is Caritas Jordan, the local partner for all Caritas sister organizations with Syrian response programs to be implemented in Jordan. Its case workers based in 10 centers across Jordan and responsible for conducting beneficiary assessment interviews had to cope with forms (mostly paper based) constantly changing subject to the international Caritas sister organization for which they were doing assessments on a particular day. The process not only lacked harmonization, consistency and objectivity across the Caritas network, but also across other agencies active in Jordan. In addition, it proved to be highly labor intensive, slow and resulted ultimately in beneficiary fatigue – as many beneficiaries needed to be interviewed soon after again in order to benefit from programs addressing other sector-specific needs. Recognizing these issues as a major constraint on its ability to implement programs effectively and efficiently Caritas Jordan supported by Caritas Switzerland is currently in the process of developing a beneficiary vulnerability and needs assessment system which will host beneficiary data on a CRM platform enabling beneficiary selection for programs and case management of beneficiaries. The first phase of the project has been completed: the development of an electronic data collection system (using tablets) to assess beneficiaries’ vulnerability – based on the UNHCR developed framework – and needs for humanitarian services as provided by the Caritas network. The developed system was tested in a trial which covered about 1,400 households reached through 5 Caritas centers across Jordan and involved some 30 Caritas case workers and Caritas volunteers. The trial concluded in early February 2016. Outcomes of the trial so far suggest the system will be able to deliver the following: * Scoring of beneficiary vulnerability in line with UNHCR standards and consistent across Caritas sister organizations and other agencies. * Scoring of vulnerable Jordanians in line and comparable with that of refugees. * Faster turnaround times – the beneficiary selection process can commence as soon as beneficiary interviewing has been completed. * Conducting holistic assessments of beneficiary needs which then enable Caritas to “pre-select” beneficiaries for programs with specific sector focus (e.g. health, education / livelihood) without further assessments. * Enhanced targeting of beneficiaries combining vulnerability scores with specific selection criteria such as household composition (e.g. number of children in certain age groups, dependency ratio, female headed households, etc.) or sector specific household situation (e.g. school aged children not attending school, household members with chronic health conditions not being managed, substandard shelter). * Advanced probing for improved accuracy of beneficiary data and case workers’ improved understanding of beneficiary situation. * Case workers being released from the responsibility of having to make subjective assessments of beneficiaries. * Overall reduced beneficiary fatigue. On the technical side, the following observations were made: * In line with growing experience of the humanitarian community, the accuracy of data was substantially improved and labor intensive paper-based data collection replaced with faster and more efficient electronic system. * Improved skips and other functions (such as piping and generation of dynamic content) proved to be key for selection of the mobile data collection and form-building platform. Without these features, more sophisticated and powerful questionnaires cannot be designed.

Speakers
avatar for Sigrid Pfaffle

Sigrid Pfaffle

M & E Specialist, MENA Region, Caritas Swiss
Sigrid Pfaffle is a specialist in monitoring & evaluation, social and market research and analysis, project planning and management within public, private sector and not-for-profit organisations. Born and brought up in Germany, Sigrid has worked - after completing a Master's... Read More →



Monday May 16, 2016 14:00 - 14:45
Cub

14:00

The NetHope Project Reconnect - Connecting Refugees and Asylum Seekers to Online Ressources
Limited Capacity seats available

In 2015, more than one million people sought refuge in Germany, fleeing war and persecution in their home countries. Now they face new challenges: learning a new language, settling into new communities, resuming education and work.

NetHope and Google.org believe that access to Internet resources is key to connecting refugees to their new communities. With the support from Google.org, NetHope is launching Project Reconnect: an initiative providing 25,000 managed Chromebooks to nonprofit organizations supporting refugees in Germany. The project aims to help refugees as they strive to rebuild their lives, by facilitating access to education and information resources on the web.
Managed Chromebooks combined with Internet access allow refugees to access information, assistance and educational opportunities and can be used in transitional housing projects, classrooms, counseling centers, youth programs and many other situations. Here are a few ideas of projects nonprofits may consider:
- Set up a language learning center by running web-based language resources in full-screen mode.
- Provide a self-service information kiosk by securing a Chromebook in an accessible location.
- Organize children's activities with appropriate educational games.
- Enhance educational opportunities with the use of Chromebooks in classroom and training situations.
- Create an Internet cafe-like environment to allow refugees to connect with friends and family and access assistance information.
These scenarios and many more are possible with managed Chromebooks which allow organizations to provide a rich computing platform; all with minimal need for on-site IT intervention, maintenance and support.

Speakers
avatar for Isaac Kwamy

Isaac Kwamy

Director, Global Programs, Humanitarian Disaster Management, NetHope
Isaac is presently the Global Programs Director of Humanitarian Operations and Disaster Management for NetHope. Isaac leads NetHope’s Global Humanitarian Operations Programs including Emergency Preparedness, Response & Recovery efforts, Crisis Informatics, Access to Information... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 14:00 - 14:45
Giraffe 259

14:00

The RedRose One System in DRC and Nigeria: Integrated e-Marketplaces for Improved Programming Efficiencies
Limited Capacity seats available

As the humanitarian aid sector has moved more towards choice-based provision of assistance, cash modalities have come to the forefront. While cash programming provides the benefits of flexible spending and promotes use of local market systems, new challenges have arisen about cash utilization and beneficiary tracking. Donors want assurance that funding is actually allocated to preferred types of assistance, but tracking cash use is complex. Additionally, while provision of cash is preferred, often affected locations in humanitarian crises have experienced disruptions in basic banking infrastructure. The RedRose One System provides an integrated e-marketplace platform, which can function both online and offline, and integrates beneficiary and vendor management, finance, and MEAL data on an online dashboard.

CRS in DRC launched, in October 2015, a six month emergency food assistance pilot project targeting 509 vulnerable returnee HHs near the city of Goma. The RedRose (RR) pilot aims to transfer a total of $141 to each beneficiary HH through smart cards (e-cards) using the ONEsystem RedRose platform. CRS/DRC began with a market study and, based on HHs' food preferences, 39 food commodities were integrated into the RR platform. Similarly, price data for all commodities was collected and included in the platform to avoid overcharging by vendors. The project remains flexible: based on beneficiaries' expressed needs NFIs were added to the assistance package. Commodity and NFI prices in the market are monitored weekly, which allows CRS to readjust the prices of the vendors if necessary. A post-activity monitoring tool will also be integrated in the field telephones for the RR platform.

CRS in Nigeria has utilized the RedRose One System in emergency food security programming and markets-based WASH programming, first utilizing the e-marketplace app on smartphones for vendors to makes sales to program participants who utilize smart cards, and second collecting data for pre and post intervention Knowledge, Attitudes and Practices (KAP) surveys and post distribution monitoring (PDM).

Speakers
avatar for Charles Bibuya

Charles Bibuya

Deputy MEAL Coordinator, Catholic Relief Services
With an extensive experience in Planning, Monitoring, Evaluation, Accountability and Learning (MEAL), and Information and Communication Technologies for Development (ICT4D). He is currently serve as the Deputy MEAL and ICT4D Coordinator in the DRC country program. Responsibilities... Read More →
ME

Marcelle Empey

International Development Fellow, Catholic Relief Services
Marcelle has a background in peacebuilding and monitoring and evaluation. She is currently supporting CRS/DRC’s emergency programming.
avatar for Maggie Holmesheoran

Maggie Holmesheoran

Emergency Coordinator, CRS
Maggie Holmesheoran: CRS Nigeria Yobe State Emergency Coordinator. Maggie supports all emergency programming in the northeast, including emergency food security, markets-based WASH and the CORE Group Polio Program. Maggie is an anthropologist, food and agriculture systems specialist... Read More →



Monday May 16, 2016 14:00 - 14:45
Giraffe 258

14:45

Integrated Approach to Beneficiary Needs Assessment and Case Management
Limited Capacity seats available

The Syrian crisis is now in its fifth year and Jordan is hosting some 625,000 Syrians refugees – most of them arrived in Jordan in the first 2-3 years since the outbreak of the war. The vast majority of Syrian refugees – over 500,000 – are living in Jordanian cities and rural communities, outside of camps. Thanks to the generosity of the Jordanian government and its people, a substantial international and national humanitarian aid effort and the initiatives of the refugees themselves, humanitarian standards were met for most refugees. Now, five years into the crisis the capacity of Jordanian communities to host refugees has become severely stretched. Having recognized that this protracted emergency requires a different approach, humanitarian agencies are now adopting a dual response: on one hand they are focusing on strengthening the resilience of refugees and their Jordanian hosting communities and on the other hand they are increasingly focused on ensuring that assistance is delivered in an efficient and effective way and on targeting the most vulnerable of households among refugees and Jordanians in hosting communities. All this requires increased coordination and synchronization between aid organizations. To facilitate this, a UNHCR-led initiative (supported by a steering committee of major aid agencies operating in Jordan) developed a framework aimed at assessing the vulnerability of refugees: universally and for each sector – basic needs, food security, shelter, health, education and WASH. Operating in this environment is Caritas Jordan, the local partner for all Caritas sister organizations with Syrian response programs to be implemented in Jordan. Its case workers based in 10 centers across Jordan and responsible for conducting beneficiary assessment interviews had to cope with forms (mostly paper based) constantly changing subject to the international Caritas sister organization for which they were doing assessments on a particular day. The process not only lacked harmonization, consistency and objectivity across the Caritas network, but also across other agencies active in Jordan. In addition, it proved to be highly labor intensive, slow and resulted ultimately in beneficiary fatigue – as many beneficiaries needed to be interviewed soon after again in order to benefit from programs addressing other sector-specific needs. Recognizing these issues as a major constraint on its ability to implement programs effectively and efficiently Caritas Jordan supported by Caritas Switzerland is currently in the process of developing a beneficiary vulnerability and needs assessment system which will host beneficiary data on a CRM platform enabling beneficiary selection for programs and case management of beneficiaries. The first phase of the project has been completed: the development of an electronic data collection system (using tablets) to assess beneficiaries’ vulnerability – based on the UNHCR developed framework – and needs for humanitarian services as provided by the Caritas network. The developed system was tested in a trial which covered about 1,400 households reached through 5 Caritas centers across Jordan and involved some 30 Caritas case workers and Caritas volunteers. The trial concluded in early February 2016. Outcomes of the trial so far suggest the system will be able to deliver the following: * Scoring of beneficiary vulnerability in line with UNHCR standards and consistent across Caritas sister organizations and other agencies. * Scoring of vulnerable Jordanians in line and comparable with that of refugees. * Faster turnaround times – the beneficiary selection process can commence as soon as beneficiary interviewing has been completed. * Conducting holistic assessments of beneficiary needs which then enable Caritas to “pre-select” beneficiaries for programs with specific sector focus (e.g. health, education / livelihood) without further assessments. * Enhanced targeting of beneficiaries combining vulnerability scores with specific selection criteria such as household composition (e.g. number of children in certain age groups, dependency ratio, female headed households, etc.) or sector specific household situation (e.g. school aged children not attending school, household members with chronic health conditions not being managed, substandard shelter). * Advanced probing for improved accuracy of beneficiary data and case workers’ improved understanding of beneficiary situation. * Case workers being released from the responsibility of having to make subjective assessments of beneficiaries. * Overall reduced beneficiary fatigue. On the technical side, the following observations were made: * In line with growing experience of the humanitarian community, the accuracy of data was substantially improved and labor intensive paper-based data collection replaced with faster and more efficient electronic system. * Improved skips and other functions (such as piping and generation of dynamic content) proved to be key for selection of the mobile data collection and form-building platform. Without these features, more sophisticated and powerful questionnaires cannot be designed.

Speakers
avatar for Sigrid Pfaffle

Sigrid Pfaffle

M & E Specialist, MENA Region, Caritas Swiss
Sigrid Pfaffle is a specialist in monitoring & evaluation, social and market research and analysis, project planning and management within public, private sector and not-for-profit organisations. Born and brought up in Germany, Sigrid has worked - after completing a Master's... Read More →



Monday May 16, 2016 14:45 - 15:30
Cub

14:45

The NetHope Project Reconnect - Connecting Refugees and Asylum Seekers to Online Ressources
Limited Capacity full

In 2015, more than one million people sought refuge in Germany, fleeing war and persecution in their home countries. Now they face new challenges: learning a new language, settling into new communities, resuming education and work.

NetHope and Google.org believe that access to Internet resources is key to connecting refugees to their new communities. With the support from Google.org, NetHope is launching Project Reconnect: an initiative providing 25,000 managed Chromebooks to nonprofit organizations supporting refugees in Germany. The project aims to help refugees as they strive to rebuild their lives, by facilitating access to education and information resources on the web.
Managed Chromebooks combined with Internet access allow refugees to access information, assistance and educational opportunities and can be used in transitional housing projects, classrooms, counseling centers, youth programs and many other situations. Here are a few ideas of projects nonprofits may consider:
- Set up a language learning center by running web-based language resources in full-screen mode.
- Provide a self-service information kiosk by securing a Chromebook in an accessible location.
- Organize children's activities with appropriate educational games.
- Enhance educational opportunities with the use of Chromebooks in classroom and training situations.
- Create an Internet cafe-like environment to allow refugees to connect with friends and family and access assistance information.
These scenarios and many more are possible with managed Chromebooks which allow organizations to provide a rich computing platform; all with minimal need for on-site IT intervention, maintenance and support.

Speakers
avatar for Isaac Kwamy

Isaac Kwamy

Director, Global Programs, Humanitarian Disaster Management, NetHope
Isaac is presently the Global Programs Director of Humanitarian Operations and Disaster Management for NetHope. Isaac leads NetHope’s Global Humanitarian Operations Programs including Emergency Preparedness, Response & Recovery efforts, Crisis Informatics, Access to Information... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 14:45 - 15:30
Giraffe 259

16:00

How to Succeed without Operators
Limited Capacity seats available

A lot of the writing about ICT4D and M4D puts mobile network operator relationships at the center of successful programs, but just as often, the business side of operators is a huge barrier to sustainability or start-up.

This is a workshop where we describe why we build on aggregator and SIM card-based gateways. Having sustainable affordable and platform independent options promotes diversification of risk, accessibility for beneficiaries to scale beyond the pilot and sometimes just the ability to get a project started within budget!

We'll discuss the technical theory as well as various project examples and interactive demonstrations.

FrontlineSMS as an organisation has 10 years of global experience working with organisations in the educational sector. With successful projects across Africa, Asia, Latin America and more we provide and help to utilise technology platforms across many sectors..

Speakers
avatar for Alex Pitkin

Alex Pitkin

CTO + Projects, FrontlineSMS
Alex Pitkin joined the FrontlineSMS production team in Nairobi in January 2013 as the CTO. Alex runs all areas of the production team including product development, technical design and client-side consulting helping users new and old implement projects using the Frontline suite of... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 16:00 - 16:45
Giraffe 258

16:00

The RedRose One System in DRC and Nigeria: Integrated e-Marketplaces for Improved Programming Efficiencies
Limited Capacity filling up

As the humanitarian aid sector has moved more towards choice-based provision of assistance, cash modalities have come to the forefront. While cash programming provides the benefits of flexible spending and promotes use of local market systems, new challenges have arisen about cash utilization and beneficiary tracking. Donors want assurance that funding is actually allocated to preferred types of assistance, but tracking cash use is complex. Additionally, while provision of cash is preferred, often affected locations in humanitarian crises have experienced disruptions in basic banking infrastructure. The RedRose One System provides an integrated e-marketplace platform, which can function both online and offline, and integrates beneficiary and vendor management, finance, and MEAL data on an online dashboard.
CRS in DRC launched, in October 2015, a six month emergency food assistance pilot project targeting 509 vulnerable returnee HHs near the city of Goma. The RedRose (RR) pilot aims to transfer a total of $141 to each beneficiary HH through smart cards (e-cards) using the ONEsystem RedRose platform. CRS/DRC began with a market study and, based on HHs' food preferences, 39 food commodities were integrated into the RR platform. Similarly, price data for all commodities was collected and included in the platform to avoid overcharging by vendors. The project remains flexible: based on beneficiaries' expressed needs NFIs were added to the assistance package. Commodity and NFI prices in the market are monitored weekly, which allows CRS to readjust the prices of the vendors if necessary. A post-activity monitoring tool will also be integrated in the field telephones for the RR platform.
CRS in Nigeria has utilized the RedRose One System in emergency food security programming and markets-based WASH programming, first utilizing the e-marketplace app on smartphones for vendors to makes sales to program participants who utilize smart cards, and second collecting data for pre and post intervention Knowledge, Attitudes and Practices (KAP) surveys and post distribution monitoring (PDM).

Speakers
avatar for Charles Bibuya

Charles Bibuya

Deputy MEAL Coordinator, Catholic Relief Services
With an extensive experience in Planning, Monitoring, Evaluation, Accountability and Learning (MEAL), and Information and Communication Technologies for Development (ICT4D). He is currently serve as the Deputy MEAL and ICT4D Coordinator in the DRC country program. Responsibilities... Read More →
ME

Marcelle Empey

International Development Fellow, Catholic Relief Services
Marcelle has a background in peacebuilding and monitoring and evaluation. She is currently supporting CRS/DRC’s emergency programming.
avatar for Maggie Holmesheoran

Maggie Holmesheoran

Emergency Coordinator, CRS
Maggie Holmesheoran: CRS Nigeria Yobe State Emergency Coordinator. Maggie supports all emergency programming in the northeast, including emergency food security, markets-based WASH and the CORE Group Polio Program. Maggie is an anthropologist, food and agriculture systems specialist... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 16:00 - 16:45
Giraffe 259

16:45

How to Succeed without Operators
Limited Capacity filling up

A lot of the writing about ICT4D and M4D puts mobile network operator relationships at the center of successful programs, but just as often, the business side of operators is a huge barrier to sustainability or start-up.

This is a workshop where we describe why we build on aggregator and SIM card-based gateways. Having sustainable affordable and platform independent options promotes diversification of risk, accessibility for beneficiaries to scale beyond the pilot and sometimes just the ability to get a project started within budget!

We'll discuss the technical theory as well as various project examples and interactive demonstrations.

FrontlineSMS as an organisation has 10 years of global experience working with organisations in the educational sector. With successful projects across Africa, Asia, Latin America and more we provide and help to utilise technology platforms across many sectors..

Speakers
avatar for Alex Pitkin

Alex Pitkin

CTO + Projects, FrontlineSMS
Alex Pitkin joined the FrontlineSMS production team in Nairobi in January 2013 as the CTO. Alex runs all areas of the production team including product development, technical design and client-side consulting helping users new and old implement projects using the Frontline suite of... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 16:45 - 17:30
Giraffe 258

16:45

The RedRose One System in DRC and Nigeria: Integrated e-Marketplaces for Improved Programming Efficiencies
Limited Capacity seats available

As the humanitarian aid sector has moved more towards choice-based provision of assistance, cash modalities have come to the forefront. While cash programming provides the benefits of flexible spending and promotes use of local market systems, new challenges have arisen about cash utilization and beneficiary tracking. Donors want assurance that funding is actually allocated to preferred types of assistance, but tracking cash use is complex. Additionally, while provision of cash is preferred, often affected locations in humanitarian crises have experienced disruptions in basic banking infrastructure. The RedRose One System provides an integrated e-marketplace platform, which can function both online and offline, and integrates beneficiary and vendor management, finance, and MEAL data on an online dashboard.
CRS in DRC launched, in October 2015, a six month emergency food assistance pilot project targeting 509 vulnerable returnee HHs near the city of Goma. The RedRose (RR) pilot aims to transfer a total of $141 to each beneficiary HH through smart cards (e-cards) using the ONEsystem RedRose platform. CRS/DRC began with a market study and, based on HHs' food preferences, 39 food commodities were integrated into the RR platform. Similarly, price data for all commodities was collected and included in the platform to avoid overcharging by vendors. The project remains flexible: based on beneficiaries' expressed needs NFIs were added to the assistance package. Commodity and NFI prices in the market are monitored weekly, which allows CRS to readjust the prices of the vendors if necessary. A post-activity monitoring tool will also be integrated in the field telephones for the RR platform.
CRS in Nigeria has utilized the RedRose One System in emergency food security programming and markets-based WASH programming, first utilizing the e-marketplace app on smartphones for vendors to makes sales to program participants who utilize smart cards, and second collecting data for pre and post intervention Knowledge, Attitudes and Practices (KAP) surveys and post distribution monitoring (PDM).

Speakers
avatar for Charles Bibuya

Charles Bibuya

Deputy MEAL Coordinator, Catholic Relief Services
With an extensive experience in Planning, Monitoring, Evaluation, Accountability and Learning (MEAL), and Information and Communication Technologies for Development (ICT4D). He is currently serve as the Deputy MEAL and ICT4D Coordinator in the DRC country program. Responsibilities... Read More →
ME

Marcelle Empey

International Development Fellow, Catholic Relief Services
Marcelle has a background in peacebuilding and monitoring and evaluation. She is currently supporting CRS/DRC’s emergency programming.
avatar for Maggie Holmesheoran

Maggie Holmesheoran

Emergency Coordinator, CRS
Maggie Holmesheoran: CRS Nigeria Yobe State Emergency Coordinator. Maggie supports all emergency programming in the northeast, including emergency food security, markets-based WASH and the CORE Group Polio Program. Maggie is an anthropologist, food and agriculture systems specialist... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 16:45 - 17:30
Giraffe 259
 
Tuesday, May 17
 

10:45

Countering Dangerous Misinformation using ICTs
Limited Capacity seats available

Misinformation is a severe problem that poses challenges to peace, security, economic development, governance, and public health all around the world. One major problem that is arising from misinformation is a series of violence such as terror attacks, election violence and inter-communal violence. This presentation will highlight the process of choosing the right technology to handle misinformation, best practices of misinformation management and the main findings from Una Hakika a misinformation management system that was implemented after the Tana Delta conflict.
During 2012 and 2013 violence took place in the Tana Delta, killing an estimated 170 people. Research by the Sentinel team found out that misinformation was one of the drivers of the violence and to curb this , Una Hakika , which uses technology to counter misinformation was implemented. Results from a survey showed that basic mobile phone penetration stood at 83%, making SMS the appropriate technological tool to manage misinformation.
One finding from the study shows that 71% of the respondents believed that misinformation contributed to violence. One crucial lessons learnt is that misinformation management systems cannot be imposed from above, they need to be implemented bottom up and incorporate the communities involved.
The Una Hakika team has developed workflows, best practices, and software which civil societies and policy makers can apply not only in an insecure country context but in any other context.



Speakers
avatar for Christine Mutisya

Christine Mutisya

Project Coordinator, Sentinel Project
Christine Mutisya is a peacebuilding practioner. She currently works as the Una Hakika Project Coordinator an initiative by the Sentinel Project. Her areas of expertise include project management, misinformation management and community development. She has first hand field experience... Read More →



Tuesday May 17, 2016 10:45 - 11:30
Giraffe 258

10:45

Leveraging SBCC/ICT4D Innovations in the Fight against Ebola
Limited Capacity seats available

By increasing awareness of Ebola risks and working directly with communities to take action to protect themselves, CRS' Be Safe program increases community knowledge and promotes the adoption of protective behaviors to help reduce the likelihood of Ebola propagation in border communities of Senegal and Guinea Bissau. Drawing on the social-ecological theory, Be Safe complements existing mass-media awareness efforts, with additional community-level efforts which leverage the use of innovative ICT4D technology to foster dialogue, disseminate locally contextualized BCC and social mobilization approaches, spur action and shift community and social norms to better protect vulnerable communities. The project works directly with families, communities and leaders to shape social norms around Ebola through creating video messages which are then shared at scale using wireless mini-projectors. Be Safe builds on existing best practices in behavior change to implement effective approaches at scale and teamed up with One Mobile Projector Per Trainer (OMPT) to introduce mobile video projection capacity and technology to influence behavior change at the individual, household and community levels. By combining best practices in behavior change with a novel delivery approach, Be Safe accelerates knowledge transfer and behavior change in the most at risk communities. Given that Ebola is an emerging threat, and communication needs are not static, the easy-to-use and field-adapted mini-projectors and cellphone camera kits allow the project team to update its approaches and messages frequently to ensure that messages remain relevant throughout the life of the project.

Speakers
AS

Antoine Sanon

Emergency Coordinator, Catholic Relief Services
Antoine Sanon has 17 years of experience working in humanitarian preparedness and response, He is currently Emergency Coordinator at CRS Senegal also covering Mauritania, Guinea Bissau and the Gambia. Antoine holds an MA in Innovations, Development, and Societies (International Institute... Read More →



Tuesday May 17, 2016 10:45 - 11:30
Giraffe 259

11:30

Leveraging SBCC/ICT4D Innovations in the Fight against Ebola
Limited Capacity seats available

By increasing awareness of Ebola risks and working directly with communities to take action to protect themselves, CRS' Be Safe program increases community knowledge and promotes the adoption of protective behaviors to help reduce the likelihood of Ebola propagation in border communities of Senegal and Guinea Bissau. Drawing on the social-ecological theory, Be Safe complements existing mass-media awareness efforts, with additional community-level efforts which leverage the use of innovative ICT4D technology to foster dialogue, disseminate locally contextualized BCC and social mobilization approaches, spur action and shift community and social norms to better protect vulnerable communities. The project works directly with families, communities and leaders to shape social norms around Ebola through creating video messages which are then shared at scale using wireless mini-projectors. Be Safe builds on existing best practices in behavior change to implement effective approaches at scale and teamed up with One Mobile Projector Per Trainer (OMPT) to introduce mobile video projection capacity and technology to influence behavior change at the individual, household and community levels. By combining best practices in behavior change with a novel delivery approach, Be Safe accelerates knowledge transfer and behavior change in the most at risk communities. Given that Ebola is an emerging threat, and communication needs are not static, the easy-to-use and field-adapted mini-projectors and cellphone camera kits allow the project team to update its approaches and messages frequently to ensure that messages remain relevant throughout the life of the project.

Speakers
AS

Antoine Sanon

Emergency Coordinator, Catholic Relief Services
Antoine Sanon has 17 years of experience working in humanitarian preparedness and response, He is currently Emergency Coordinator at CRS Senegal also covering Mauritania, Guinea Bissau and the Gambia. Antoine holds an MA in Innovations, Development, and Societies (International Institute... Read More →



Tuesday May 17, 2016 11:30 - 12:15
Giraffe 259

12:15

Leveraging SBCC/ICT4D Innovations in the Fight against Ebola
Limited Capacity seats available

By increasing awareness of Ebola risks and working directly with communities to take action to protect themselves, CRS' Be Safe program increases community knowledge and promotes the adoption of protective behaviors to help reduce the likelihood of Ebola propagation in border communities of Senegal and Guinea Bissau. Drawing on the social-ecological theory, Be Safe complements existing mass-media awareness efforts, with additional community-level efforts which leverage the use of innovative ICT4D technology to foster dialogue, disseminate locally contextualized BCC and social mobilization approaches, spur action and shift community and social norms to better protect vulnerable communities. The project works directly with families, communities and leaders to shape social norms around Ebola through creating video messages which are then shared at scale using wireless mini-projectors. Be Safe builds on existing best practices in behavior change to implement effective approaches at scale and teamed up with One Mobile Projector Per Trainer (OMPT) to introduce mobile video projection capacity and technology to influence behavior change at the individual, household and community levels. By combining best practices in behavior change with a novel delivery approach, Be Safe accelerates knowledge transfer and behavior change in the most at risk communities. Given that Ebola is an emerging threat, and communication needs are not static, the easy-to-use and field-adapted mini-projectors and cellphone camera kits allow the project team to update its approaches and messages frequently to ensure that messages remain relevant throughout the life of the project.

Speakers
AS

Antoine Sanon

Emergency Coordinator, Catholic Relief Services
Antoine Sanon has 17 years of experience working in humanitarian preparedness and response, He is currently Emergency Coordinator at CRS Senegal also covering Mauritania, Guinea Bissau and the Gambia. Antoine holds an MA in Innovations, Development, and Societies (International Institute... Read More →



Tuesday May 17, 2016 12:15 - 13:00
Giraffe 259

14:00

Countering Dangerous Misinformation using ICTs
Limited Capacity seats available

Misinformation is a severe problem that poses challenges to peace, security, economic development, governance, and public health all around the world. One major problem that is arising from misinformation is a series of violence such as terror attacks, election violence and inter-communal violence. This presentation will highlight the process of choosing the right technology to handle misinformation, best practices of misinformation management and the main findings from Una Hakika a misinformation management system that was implemented after the Tana Delta conflict.
During 2012 and 2013 violence took place in the Tana Delta, killing an estimated 170 people. Research by the Sentinel team found out that misinformation was one of the drivers of the violence and to curb this , Una Hakika , which uses technology to counter misinformation was implemented. Results from a survey showed that basic mobile phone penetration stood at 83%, making SMS the appropriate technological tool to manage misinformation.
One finding from the study shows that 71% of the respondents believed that misinformation contributed to violence. One crucial lessons learnt is that misinformation management systems cannot be imposed from above, they need to be implemented bottom up and incorporate the communities involved.
The Una Hakika team has developed workflows, best practices, and software which civil societies and policy makers can apply not only in an insecure country context but in any other context.



Speakers
avatar for Christine Mutisya

Christine Mutisya

Project Coordinator, Sentinel Project
Christine Mutisya is a peacebuilding practioner. She currently works as the Una Hakika Project Coordinator an initiative by the Sentinel Project. Her areas of expertise include project management, misinformation management and community development. She has first hand field experience... Read More →



Tuesday May 17, 2016 14:00 - 14:45
Giraffe 259

14:00

From Radical Openness-Real-Time Collaborations in Crisis Response
Limited Capacity filling up

Inspired by volunteer responder communities including Standby Task Force and Humanitarian OpenStreetMap Team, ICT workers responding to the EU refugee crisis established simple, public, and completely open communications tools for cross organization coordination.

Using simple, publically available, and free-to-use tools, crisis responders on the Greek island of Lesbos established live chat rooms, and shared cloud-based document folders, to coordinate the establishment and maintenance of Wifi networks on the island. Groups who had never before met or collaborated were able to support each other with know-how, on-the-ground labor, equipment, and even funding.

These open spaces quickly filled with responders-professional NGO and corporate, and volunteers, working on the crisis throughout the refugee route and beyond.

What began as a lightweight coordination tool, quickly became a robust discussion and meet-up space that spawned several collaborative ICT projects including the RefugeeInfo web site for refugees, the Translation Cards mobile app for responders, and coordinated deploy and management of informational video displays throughout registration centers and border crossings.

Come hear how radical openness enabled IRC, Google, Mercy Corps, UNHCR, Cisco, NetHope, Disaster Tech Lab, Oxfam, SOS Children's VIllages, Save the Children, NRC and others to support one another's initiatives and come together to launch new programs in the midst of an emergency response.

The session will take the form of case studies presented by a panel of collaborators, followed by hands-on training on the key open-communications tools used in the response: Slack, Slack-in, Google Drive, and WhatsApp.

Moderators
avatar for Jeff Wishnie

Jeff Wishnie

Senior Director, Program Technology, Mercy Corps
Jeff Wishnie is Mercy Corps' Senior Director of Program Technology. He is responsible for the design and implementation use of ICTs to improve the effectiveness, reach, scale, and efficiency of Mercy Corps' programming globally. Jeff also provides technology strategy advising to Mercy... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Omar Mekassi

Omar Mekassi

Regional ICT Projects Manager, International Rescue Committee
Omar Meksassi is the Regional ICT projects manager for the ICT Lab in Serbia for the International Rescue committee working on finding solutions though innovative and technological approaches to humanitarian response initiatives. | He previously worked with local NGOs in the MENA... Read More →
avatar for Frank Schott

Frank Schott

Vice President of Global Programs, NetHope
Frank Schott joined NetHope in 2005, and served as Managing Director of Global Programs for 11 years. In 2016, he took on the role of Vice President of Global Programs, where he oversees Field Programs. During his time with NetHope, Frank has worked closely with member agencies, corporate... Read More →
avatar for John Warnes

John Warnes

Emergency Lab Technology Officer, UNHCR Innovation, United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR)
John Warnes is the Emergency Lab Technology Officer for UNHCR Innovation and leads on designing and implementing technology solutions to support UNHCR's activities around communicating with communities in emergencies. Previously he worked with the Communicating with Disaster Affected... Read More →
avatar for Jeff Wishnie

Jeff Wishnie

Senior Director, Program Technology, Mercy Corps
Jeff Wishnie is Mercy Corps' Senior Director of Program Technology. He is responsible for the design and implementation use of ICTs to improve the effectiveness, reach, scale, and efficiency of Mercy Corps' programming globally. Jeff also provides technology strategy advising to Mercy... Read More →

Exhibitors
avatar for Akros

Akros

Data for the Community, By the Community: Feedback Loops for Sanitation, Education and Malaria Control | Mobile data collection tools have revolutionized data timeliness, breadth, and quality in less developed countries. But what happens to those data after they are aggregated... Read More →



Tuesday May 17, 2016 14:00 - 14:45
Giraffe 258

14:45

Countering Dangerous Misinformation using ICTs
Limited Capacity seats available

Misinformation is a severe problem that poses challenges to peace, security, economic development, governance, and public health all around the world. One major problem that is arising from misinformation is a series of violence such as terror attacks, election violence and inter-communal violence. This presentation will highlight the process of choosing the right technology to handle misinformation, best practices of misinformation management and the main findings from Una Hakika a misinformation management system that was implemented after the Tana Delta conflict.
During 2012 and 2013 violence took place in the Tana Delta, killing an estimated 170 people. Research by the Sentinel team found out that misinformation was one of the drivers of the violence and to curb this , Una Hakika , which uses technology to counter misinformation was implemented. Results from a survey showed that basic mobile phone penetration stood at 83%, making SMS the appropriate technological tool to manage misinformation.
One finding from the study shows that 71% of the respondents believed that misinformation contributed to violence. One crucial lessons learnt is that misinformation management systems cannot be imposed from above, they need to be implemented bottom up and incorporate the communities involved.
The Una Hakika team has developed workflows, best practices, and software which civil societies and policy makers can apply not only in an insecure country context but in any other context.



Speakers
avatar for Christine Mutisya

Christine Mutisya

Project Coordinator, Sentinel Project
Christine Mutisya is a peacebuilding practioner. She currently works as the Una Hakika Project Coordinator an initiative by the Sentinel Project. Her areas of expertise include project management, misinformation management and community development. She has first hand field experience... Read More →



Tuesday May 17, 2016 14:45 - 15:30
Giraffe 259

14:45

From Radical Openness-Real-Time Collaborations in Crisis Response
Limited Capacity full

Inspired by volunteer responder communities including Standby Task Force and Humanitarian OpenStreetMap Team, ICT workers responding to the EU refugee crisis established simple, public, and completely open communications tools for cross organization coordination.

Using simple, publically available, and free-to-use tools, crisis responders on the Greek island of Lesbos established live chat rooms, and shared cloud-based document folders, to coordinate the establishment and maintenance of Wifi networks on the island. Groups who had never before met or collaborated were able to support each other with know-how, on-the-ground labor, equipment, and even funding.

These open spaces quickly filled with responders-professional NGO and corporate, and volunteers, working on the crisis throughout the refugee route and beyond.

What began as a lightweight coordination tool, quickly became a robust discussion and meet-up space that spawned several collaborative ICT projects including the RefugeeInfo web site for refugees, the Translation Cards mobile app for responders, and coordinated deploy and management of informational video displays throughout registration centers and border crossings.

Come hear how radical openness enabled IRC, Google, Mercy Corps, UNHCR, Cisco, NetHope, Disaster Tech Lab, Oxfam, SOS Children's VIllages, Save the Children, NRC and others to support one another's initiatives and come together to launch new programs in the midst of an emergency response.

The session will take the form of case studies presented by a panel of collaborators, followed by hands-on training on the key open-communications tools used in the response: Slack, Slack-in, Google Drive, and WhatsApp.

Moderators
avatar for Jeff Wishnie

Jeff Wishnie

Senior Director, Program Technology, Mercy Corps
Jeff Wishnie is Mercy Corps' Senior Director of Program Technology. He is responsible for the design and implementation use of ICTs to improve the effectiveness, reach, scale, and efficiency of Mercy Corps' programming globally. Jeff also provides technology strategy advising to Mercy... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Omar Mekassi

Omar Mekassi

Regional ICT Projects Manager, International Rescue Committee
Omar Meksassi is the Regional ICT projects manager for the ICT Lab in Serbia for the International Rescue committee working on finding solutions though innovative and technological approaches to humanitarian response initiatives. | He previously worked with local NGOs in the MENA... Read More →
avatar for Frank Schott

Frank Schott

Vice President of Global Programs, NetHope
Frank Schott joined NetHope in 2005, and served as Managing Director of Global Programs for 11 years. In 2016, he took on the role of Vice President of Global Programs, where he oversees Field Programs. During his time with NetHope, Frank has worked closely with member agencies, corporate... Read More →
avatar for John Warnes

John Warnes

Emergency Lab Technology Officer, UNHCR Innovation, United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR)
John Warnes is the Emergency Lab Technology Officer for UNHCR Innovation and leads on designing and implementing technology solutions to support UNHCR's activities around communicating with communities in emergencies. Previously he worked with the Communicating with Disaster Affected... Read More →
avatar for Jeff Wishnie

Jeff Wishnie

Senior Director, Program Technology, Mercy Corps
Jeff Wishnie is Mercy Corps' Senior Director of Program Technology. He is responsible for the design and implementation use of ICTs to improve the effectiveness, reach, scale, and efficiency of Mercy Corps' programming globally. Jeff also provides technology strategy advising to Mercy... Read More →



Tuesday May 17, 2016 14:45 - 15:30
Giraffe 258

16:00

Debris Management Process Case Study Microsoft & UNDP
Limited Capacity seats available

After the Nepal Earthquake of 2015, Microsoft and UNDP collaborated on innovative ways to rebuild and respond quickly.  Working with a local team at the Microsoft Innovation Center (MIC) Nepal, UNDP is creating a mobile application that tracks and coordinates logistics, personnel and payments to help administrate the rebuilding effort, storing critical records both on-premises and in the cloud. While the approach was borne from the necessity of extreme circumstances, it may literally redefine the administration of humanitarian aid, and recovery and reconstruction efforts when the next inevitable disaster occurs. Through this process, they have employed over 3,000 local people, accomplished over 2,000 safe demolitions, and from those we’ve recovered $11 million worth of recyclable material.

Speakers
avatar for Kate Krukiel

Kate Krukiel

Director of Strategic Partnerships, Microsoft
Kate Krukiel joined Microsoft in 2006 and is currently the Technology Advisor for Partnerships for the United Nations International Organizations. In this role she is responsible for developing the key strategic objectives, mission-related partnerships and solution strategies across... Read More →


Tuesday May 17, 2016 16:00 - 16:45
Giraffe 259

16:00

Free, On-Demand SBCC on Simple Mobile Phones
Limited Capacity full

When her child is sick, how will a woman with low literacy in rural Africa get reliable health information? Traditional mass media such as radio messages, billboards, and posters have proven to be effective at reaching large numbers of people, but these channels do not allow the target audiences to have input on what information they receive, or where and when they receive it. Other mobile and social media interventions use the same "push" technique, sending out predetermined messages that are frequently misdirected and only moderately successful at engaging individuals with lower literacy levels.

As the first new SBCC channel since the invention of the television, mobile phones have the ability to provide populations with a "pull" channel, empowering them to access information that is 1) retrievable on demand to meet their immediate need, 2) accessible by lower literates through detailed voice recordings, 3) reachable using simple mobile phones, 4) affordable, and
5) linked to actionable next steps, such as referrals.

In 2010, HNI created the 3-2-1 Service, a mobile phone information service to prepare resource- poor individuals to take action to improve their well-being. In Madagascar, 4 million unique users have made 50 million information searches on the 3-2-1 Service. The Service was expanded to Malawi in 2014, with 800,000 users making more than 4 million inquiries in the first 12 months.

HNI is now launching the 3-2-1 Service with telecom partners in Burkina Faso, Cambodia, the DRC, Ghana, Mali, Mozambique, Nigeria, Niger, Tanzania, Uganda, and Zambia. It is an effective, sustainable and cost-efficient intervention, as telecoms have a commercial incentive to provide the Service for free without donor dependency.

Speakers
avatar for Jamie Arkin

Jamie Arkin

Program Manager, Human Network International
Jamie is HNI’s Uganda Program Manager based in Kampala.  In this role, she works with various stakeholders, helping them utilize mobile technology to engage beneficiaries as well as improve monitoring and evaluation.  Before joining HNI, Jamie worked in public health, focusing... Read More →


Tuesday May 17, 2016 16:00 - 16:45
Giraffe 258

16:45

Debris Management Process Case Study Microsoft & UNDP
Limited Capacity seats available

After the Nepal Earthquake of 2015, Microsoft and UNDP collaborated on innovative ways to rebuild and respond quickly.  Working with a local team at the Microsoft Innovation Center (MIC) Nepal, UNDP is creating a mobile application that tracks and coordinates logistics, personnel and payments to help administrate the rebuilding effort, storing critical records both on-premises and in the cloud. While the approach was borne from the necessity of extreme circumstances, it may literally redefine the administration of humanitarian aid, and recovery and reconstruction efforts when the next inevitable disaster occurs. Through this process, they have employed over 3,000 local people, accomplished over 2,000 safe demolitions, and from those we’ve recovered $11 million worth of recyclable material.

Speakers
avatar for Kate Krukiel

Kate Krukiel

Director of Strategic Partnerships, Microsoft
Kate Krukiel joined Microsoft in 2006 and is currently the Technology Advisor for Partnerships for the United Nations International Organizations. In this role she is responsible for developing the key strategic objectives, mission-related partnerships and solution strategies across... Read More →


Tuesday May 17, 2016 16:45 - 17:30
Giraffe 259

16:45

Free, On-Demand SBCC on Simple Mobile Phones
Limited Capacity seats available

When her child is sick, how will a woman with low literacy in rural Africa get reliable health information? Traditional mass media such as radio messages, billboards, and posters have proven to be effective at reaching large numbers of people, but these channels do not allow the target audiences to have input on what information they receive, or where and when they receive it. Other mobile and social media interventions use the same "push" technique, sending out predetermined messages that are frequently misdirected and only moderately successful at engaging individuals with lower literacy levels.

As the first new SBCC channel since the invention of the television, mobile phones have the ability to provide populations with a "pull" channel, empowering them to access information that is 1) retrievable on demand to meet their immediate need, 2) accessible by lower literates through detailed voice recordings, 3) reachable using simple mobile phones, 4) affordable, and
5) linked to actionable next steps, such as referrals.

In 2010, HNI created the 3-2-1 Service, a mobile phone information service to prepare resource- poor individuals to take action to improve their well-being. In Madagascar, 4 million unique users have made 50 million information searches on the 3-2-1 Service. The Service was expanded to Malawi in 2014, with 800,000 users making more than 4 million inquiries in the first 12 months.

HNI is now launching the 3-2-1 Service with telecom partners in Burkina Faso, Cambodia, the DRC, Ghana, Mali, Mozambique, Nigeria, Niger, Tanzania, Uganda, and Zambia. It is an effective, sustainable and cost-efficient intervention, as telecoms have a commercial incentive to provide the Service for free without donor dependency.

Speakers
avatar for Jamie Arkin

Jamie Arkin

Program Manager, Human Network International
Jamie is HNI’s Uganda Program Manager based in Kampala.  In this role, she works with various stakeholders, helping them utilize mobile technology to engage beneficiaries as well as improve monitoring and evaluation.  Before joining HNI, Jamie worked in public health, focusing... Read More →


Tuesday May 17, 2016 16:45 - 17:30
Giraffe 258
 
Wednesday, May 18
 

10:45

Red Rose CPS: Using a Fully Integrated E-Platform in Emergencies & Minimal Infrastructure Settings
Limited Capacity full

Markets and cash-based delivery of humanitarian assistance provide flexibility of choice to aid recipients while concurrently sustaining and strengthening market systems. However, the risk associated with provision of actual cash can compromise the 'do no harm' ethic of humanitarian work. As such, Electronic cash systems have emerged as a preferred technology, providing the benefits of cash with improved risk management.
Red Rose has developed the ONEsolution for the humanitarian aid sector, which is a fully integrated approach to e-cash program management and includes; beneficiary and vendor information management, real-time monitoring and evaluation data to enable program managers to keep their programs relevant and fit for purpose, an interactive customized dashboard for data visualizations, and financial management. CRS currently utilizes Red Rose's ONEsolution for emergency programming in Nigeria and DRC, providing Food and Non Food Items to vulnerable communities through local vendors who manage the supply.
During the training session Red Rose and CRS will walk participants through the steps of deciding whether the Red Rose ONESystem is appropriate for their programming needs, and get hands-on experience using the Red Rose Apps, which support beneficiary registration, market monitoring, post-distribution monitoring needs and Point of Sale transactions for Vendors to conduct sales.

Speakers
HB

Hakan Buyukbayrak

Technical Director, Red Rose
Director and Co-Founder of Red Rose, experience in designing and development of e-cash transfers systems including: Open and closed loop systems on a fully integrated platform encompassing beneficiary registration, M&E and data analytics. | Degree in Computer Science


Wednesday May 18, 2016 10:45 - 11:50
Ivory - Partition 2

11:50

Red Rose CPS: Using a Fully Integrated E-Platform in Emergencies & Minimal Infrastructure Settings
Limited Capacity seats available

Markets and cash-based delivery of humanitarian assistance provide flexibility of choice to aid recipients while concurrently sustaining and strengthening market systems. However, the risk associated with provision of actual cash can compromise the 'do no harm' ethic of humanitarian work. As such, Electronic cash systems have emerged as a preferred technology, providing the benefits of cash with improved risk management.
Red Rose has developed the ONEsolution for the humanitarian aid sector, which is a fully integrated approach to e-cash program management and includes; beneficiary and vendor information management, real-time monitoring and evaluation data to enable program managers to keep their programs relevant and fit for purpose, an interactive customized dashboard for data visualizations, and financial management. CRS currently utilizes Red Rose's ONEsolution for emergency programming in Nigeria and DRC, providing Food and Non Food Items to vulnerable communities through local vendors who manage the supply.
During the training session Red Rose and CRS will walk participants through the steps of deciding whether the Red Rose ONESystem is appropriate for their programming needs, and get hands-on experience using the Red Rose Apps, which support beneficiary registration, market monitoring, post-distribution monitoring needs and Point of Sale transactions for Vendors to conduct sales.

Speakers
HB

Hakan Buyukbayrak

Technical Director, Red Rose
Director and Co-Founder of Red Rose, experience in designing and development of e-cash transfers systems including: Open and closed loop systems on a fully integrated platform encompassing beneficiary registration, M&E and data analytics. | Degree in Computer Science


Wednesday May 18, 2016 11:50 - 12:50
Ivory - Partition 2

13:50

ICT for cash programming : compliance with beneficiaries' data protection standards and financial regulations
Limited Capacity filling up

"Cash and voucher together have risen from less than 1% in 2004 to around 6% of total humanitarian spending today. In 2014, out of USD 25 billion of humanitarian spend, USD 1.2 billion was in cash and voucher" (ODI, 2015). The exponential increase of Cash Transfer Programming (CTP) is changing the landscape of humanitarian intervention and sometimes challenges its ways of operating. Beneficiaries' data protection is particularly challenges with the use of more complex financial product to deliver cash, in addition of more intrusive but necessary anti-terrorism and financial regulations. ICT can facilitate compliance with financial regulation and respect beneficiaries' privacy rights while delivering efficiently cash to save lives. After a rapid overview of financial regulation and data privacy standards humanitarian organizations need to comply with, we will explain how ICT can help us along the project cycle be used efficiently to deliver CTP while complying with sectors regulations and standards.

Speakers
avatar for William Martin

William Martin

Technical Advisor Cash and Markets, Catholic Relief Services
Specialist of economic and early recovery in highly challenging contexts, William is responsible for supporting the development and implementation of markets-based and cash transfer programs for CRS’ emergency response around the globe. With more than 8 years of experience, his... Read More →



Wednesday May 18, 2016 13:50 - 14:55
Jambo Conference Centre B

14:55

ICT for cash programming : compliance with beneficiaries' data protection standards and financial regulations
Limited Capacity filling up

"Cash and voucher together have risen from less than 1% in 2004 to around 6% of total humanitarian spending today. In 2014, out of USD 25 billion of humanitarian spend, USD 1.2 billion was in cash and voucher" (ODI, 2015). The exponential increase of Cash Transfer Programming (CTP) is changing the landscape of humanitarian intervention and sometimes challenges its ways of operating. Beneficiaries' data protection is particularly challenges with the use of more complex financial product to deliver cash, in addition of more intrusive but necessary anti-terrorism and financial regulations. ICT can facilitate compliance with financial regulation and respect beneficiaries' privacy rights while delivering efficiently cash to save lives. After a rapid overview of financial regulation and data privacy standards humanitarian organizations need to comply with, we will explain how ICT can help us along the project cycle be used efficiently to deliver CTP while complying with sectors regulations and standards.

Speakers
avatar for William Martin

William Martin

Technical Advisor Cash and Markets, Catholic Relief Services
Specialist of economic and early recovery in highly challenging contexts, William is responsible for supporting the development and implementation of markets-based and cash transfer programs for CRS’ emergency response around the globe. With more than 8 years of experience, his... Read More →



Wednesday May 18, 2016 14:55 - 16:00
Jambo Conference Centre B

16:30

ICT for cash programming : compliance with beneficiaries' data protection standards and financial regulations
Limited Capacity seats available

"Cash and voucher together have risen from less than 1% in 2004 to around 6% of total humanitarian spending today. In 2014, out of USD 25 billion of humanitarian spend, USD 1.2 billion was in cash and voucher" (ODI, 2015). The exponential increase of Cash Transfer Programming (CTP) is changing the landscape of humanitarian intervention and sometimes challenges its ways of operating. Beneficiaries' data protection is particularly challenges with the use of more complex financial product to deliver cash, in addition of more intrusive but necessary anti-terrorism and financial regulations. ICT can facilitate compliance with financial regulation and respect beneficiaries' privacy rights while delivering efficiently cash to save lives. After a rapid overview of financial regulation and data privacy standards humanitarian organizations need to comply with, we will explain how ICT can help us along the project cycle be used efficiently to deliver CTP while complying with sectors regulations and standards.

Speakers
avatar for William Martin

William Martin

Technical Advisor Cash and Markets, Catholic Relief Services
Specialist of economic and early recovery in highly challenging contexts, William is responsible for supporting the development and implementation of markets-based and cash transfer programs for CRS’ emergency response around the globe. With more than 8 years of experience, his... Read More →



Wednesday May 18, 2016 16:30 - 17:30
Jambo Conference Centre B
 
Thursday, May 19
 

10:45

Applying Predictive Analysis to Optimize Location of Food Distribution Sites
Limited Capacity seats available

CRS-Madagascar has received a Development Food Assistance Program funded by USAID. This project (Fararano) provides food rations to pregnant/lactating women and children under 2. Fararano plans to target 42,000 mother-child pairs by distributing food rations on a monthly basis from approximately 200 distribution sites.
Historically, distribution site selection is based on local context and includes basic criteria such as existence of large space, shelter, and water supply and often results in inadequate coverage of beneficiaries with some individuals having to walk 18 km (one way) to receive distributions. This has obvious implications including - Absenteeism from food distribution events, Increased fuel costs associated with returning remaining food, Commodity planning and supply chain disruption, Beneficiary women are exposed in high risk rape because they leave home at 4am to join the distribution site. Faced for these issues, CRS proposed applying geospatial analysis to help optimize site selection. Optimization was not based on average walk times but reduction of outlier walking distances. Our goals were to optimize the placement of distribution sites based on a maximum walking distance of 5km, to optimize the routes traveled by delivery trucks to the distribution sites, to increase the efficiency of all operations and transport. CRS contracted with ESRI to develop spatial tools to assist in food distribution site planning and management. The key tools to address this problem were Predictive Analysis toolset including the Speed Model Builder, Route Finder Tool and Distance/Speed Tool, classical analysis tools including Buffers, iFormBuilder integration tools developed by Esri Professional Services
Site selection, or suitability analysis, is the type of spatial analysis that we used to identify the best location for a particular facility or activity.
Goods distributions are common across many projects. A successful model using the GIS Solution and technology which are less expensive, scalable and sustainable could be readily adapted by other projects

Speakers
avatar for Daniel Andriantsimba

Daniel Andriantsimba

SARO Solution Architect, Catholic Relief Services
Daniel Andriantsimba is an Engineer with 15 years' experiences in IT with specialization in Gis. I have been with CRS since 2005 and supported the Country Program to promote the GIS and new technology used in multi-sectorial programs Co-speaker: Tohera Razafitsiarovana, ICT4D Specialist... Read More →
TR

Tohera Razafitsiarovana

ICT4D Specialist, Catholic Relief Servces (CRS)
Tohera Razafitsiarovana is an ICT4D Specialist for CRS-Madagascar.



Thursday May 19, 2016 10:45 - 11:30
Giraffe 203

10:45

Developing an Organizational ICT4D Strategy
Limited Capacity full

This session will describe the steps we have taken at Catholic Relief Services to update our ICT4D strategy. We will review topics studied as part of this effort, polarities that surfaced and share the results that set our ICT4D strategic direction for the coming years.

Speakers
avatar for Steve Hellen

Steve Hellen

Director, ICT4D & GIS, Catholic Relief Services
Steve Hellen has nearly 20 years of information technology experience. He joined Catholic Relief Services in 2012 to lead a team focused on Information and Communication Technology for Development (ICT4D) and improvements to systems throughout the agency. He managed the implementation... Read More →



Thursday May 19, 2016 10:45 - 11:30
Cub

11:30

Building Country Program ICT4D Capacity
Limited Capacity full

This presentation will walk the audience through a new CRS (internal) service for assessing and building a country program's ICT4D capacity. While this is focused on CRS, the process should be applicable outside of CRS.

This ICT4D Capacity assessment looks at human, technical and process factors as well as current and upcoming projects that leverage ICT4D to make recommendations towards building a strong ICT4D foundation within a country program.

This presentation is meant to be practical in nature and give the audience tools to conduct their own ICT4D capacity assessment of a given country program.

Speakers
avatar for Nate Barthel

Nate Barthel

Sr. Manager ICT4D, Catholic Relief Services
Nate Barthel is Sr. Project Manager for ICT4D Project Services, an internal ICT4D consultancy housed within GKIM. In this role he manages a global team dedicated to supporting CRS Programming in the appropriate and successful integration of technology to support our work. Since joining... Read More →


Thursday May 19, 2016 11:30 - 12:15
Giraffe 203

11:30

Developing an Organizational ICT4D Strategy
Limited Capacity full

This session will describe the steps we have taken at Catholic Relief Services to update our ICT4D strategy. We will review topics studied as part of this effort, polarities that surfaced and share the results that set our ICT4D strategic direction for the coming years.

Speakers
avatar for Steve Hellen

Steve Hellen

Director, ICT4D & GIS, Catholic Relief Services
Steve Hellen has nearly 20 years of information technology experience. He joined Catholic Relief Services in 2012 to lead a team focused on Information and Communication Technology for Development (ICT4D) and improvements to systems throughout the agency. He managed the implementation... Read More →



Thursday May 19, 2016 11:30 - 12:15
Cub

12:15

Building Country Program ICT4D Capacity
Limited Capacity full

This presentation will walk the audience through a new CRS (internal) service for assessing and building a country program's ICT4D capacity. While this is focused on CRS, the process should be applicable outside of CRS.

This ICT4D Capacity assessment looks at human, technical and process factors as well as current and upcoming projects that leverage ICT4D to make recommendations towards building a strong ICT4D foundation within a country program.

This presentation is meant to be practical in nature and give the audience tools to conduct their own ICT4D capacity assessment of a given country program.

Speakers
avatar for Nate Barthel

Nate Barthel

Sr. Manager ICT4D, Catholic Relief Services
Nate Barthel is Sr. Project Manager for ICT4D Project Services, an internal ICT4D consultancy housed within GKIM. In this role he manages a global team dedicated to supporting CRS Programming in the appropriate and successful integration of technology to support our work. Since joining... Read More →


Thursday May 19, 2016 12:15 - 13:00
Giraffe 203

12:15

Developing an Organizational ICT4D Strategy
Limited Capacity full

This session will describe the steps we have taken at Catholic Relief Services to update our ICT4D strategy. We will review topics studied as part of this effort, polarities that surfaced and share the results that set our ICT4D strategic direction for the coming years.

Speakers
avatar for Steve Hellen

Steve Hellen

Director, ICT4D & GIS, Catholic Relief Services
Steve Hellen has nearly 20 years of information technology experience. He joined Catholic Relief Services in 2012 to lead a team focused on Information and Communication Technology for Development (ICT4D) and improvements to systems throughout the agency. He managed the implementation... Read More →



Thursday May 19, 2016 12:15 - 13:00
Cub

14:00

Applying Predictive Analysis to Optimize Location of Food Distribution Sites
Limited Capacity filling up

CRS-Madagascar has received a Development Food Assistance Program funded by USAID. This project (Fararano) provides food rations to pregnant/lactating women and children under 2. Fararano plans to target 42,000 mother-child pairs by distributing food rations on a monthly basis from approximately 200 distribution sites.
Historically, distribution site selection is based on local context and includes basic criteria such as existence of large space, shelter, and water supply and often results in inadequate coverage of beneficiaries with some individuals having to walk 18 km (one way) to receive distributions. This has obvious implications including - Absenteeism from food distribution events, Increased fuel costs associated with returning remaining food, Commodity planning and supply chain disruption, Beneficiary women are exposed in high risk rape because they leave home at 4am to join the distribution site. Faced for these issues, CRS proposed applying geospatial analysis to help optimize site selection. Optimization was not based on average walk times but reduction of outlier walking distances. Our goals were to optimize the placement of distribution sites based on a maximum walking distance of 5km, to optimize the routes traveled by delivery trucks to the distribution sites, to increase the efficiency of all operations and transport. CRS contracted with ESRI to develop spatial tools to assist in food distribution site planning and management. The key tools to address this problem were Predictive Analysis toolset including the Speed Model Builder, Route Finder Tool and Distance/Speed Tool, classical analysis tools including Buffers, iFormBuilder integration tools developed by Esri Professional Services
Site selection, or suitability analysis, is the type of spatial analysis that we used to identify the best location for a particular facility or activity.
Goods distributions are common across many projects. A successful model using the GIS Solution and technology which are less expensive, scalable and sustainable could be readily adapted by other projects

Speakers
avatar for Daniel Andriantsimba

Daniel Andriantsimba

SARO Solution Architect, Catholic Relief Services
Daniel Andriantsimba is an Engineer with 15 years' experiences in IT with specialization in Gis. I have been with CRS since 2005 and supported the Country Program to promote the GIS and new technology used in multi-sectorial programs Co-speaker: Tohera Razafitsiarovana, ICT4D Specialist... Read More →
TR

Tohera Razafitsiarovana

ICT4D Specialist, Catholic Relief Servces (CRS)
Tohera Razafitsiarovana is an ICT4D Specialist for CRS-Madagascar.



Thursday May 19, 2016 14:00 - 14:45
Giraffe 203

14:00

Case Study: Data Protection in e-Voucher Systems
Limited Capacity full

In collaboration with the Electronic Learning Action Network (ELAN) and Mercy Corps, CRS is participating in an assessment of two e-voucher implementations of the Red Rose's ONEcard platform in Nigeria. The assessment mapped data flows and practices and provided recommendations based on Data Protection best practice published by the Cash Learning Partnership (CaLP).

This presentation will explore the CaLP Data Protection guidance, the results of the assessment, and the recommendations for improvement of data management and protection. A primary focus of this presentation will be to share resultant artifacts and lessons learned to aid participants in appropriately setting up and securing e-voucher systems in emergency settings.

Speakers
avatar for Joel Urbanowicz

Joel Urbanowicz

Director, Information Security & ICT Process Governance, Catholic Relief Services
Joel Urbanowicz is Director of Information Security and ICT Process Governance in the Global Knowledge and Information Management (GKIM) organization at Catholic Relief Services. He received a B.A. degree in Communications from Michigan State University and an M.S. in Information... Read More →



Thursday May 19, 2016 14:00 - 14:45
Giraffe 202

14:45

Applying Predictive Analysis to Optimize Location of Food Distribution Sites
Limited Capacity seats available

CRS-Madagascar has received a Development Food Assistance Program funded by USAID. This project (Fararano) provides food rations to pregnant/lactating women and children under 2. Fararano plans to target 42,000 mother-child pairs by distributing food rations on a monthly basis from approximately 200 distribution sites.
Historically, distribution site selection is based on local context and includes basic criteria such as existence of large space, shelter, and water supply and often results in inadequate coverage of beneficiaries with some individuals having to walk 18 km (one way) to receive distributions. This has obvious implications including - Absenteeism from food distribution events, Increased fuel costs associated with returning remaining food, Commodity planning and supply chain disruption, Beneficiary women are exposed in high risk rape because they leave home at 4am to join the distribution site. Faced for these issues, CRS proposed applying geospatial analysis to help optimize site selection. Optimization was not based on average walk times but reduction of outlier walking distances. Our goals were to optimize the placement of distribution sites based on a maximum walking distance of 5km, to optimize the routes traveled by delivery trucks to the distribution sites, to increase the efficiency of all operations and transport. CRS contracted with ESRI to develop spatial tools to assist in food distribution site planning and management. The key tools to address this problem were Predictive Analysis toolset including the Speed Model Builder, Route Finder Tool and Distance/Speed Tool, classical analysis tools including Buffers, iFormBuilder integration tools developed by Esri Professional Services
Site selection, or suitability analysis, is the type of spatial analysis that we used to identify the best location for a particular facility or activity.
Goods distributions are common across many projects. A successful model using the GIS Solution and technology which are less expensive, scalable and sustainable could be readily adapted by other projects

Speakers
avatar for Daniel Andriantsimba

Daniel Andriantsimba

SARO Solution Architect, Catholic Relief Services
Daniel Andriantsimba is an Engineer with 15 years' experiences in IT with specialization in Gis. I have been with CRS since 2005 and supported the Country Program to promote the GIS and new technology used in multi-sectorial programs Co-speaker: Tohera Razafitsiarovana, ICT4D Specialist... Read More →
TR

Tohera Razafitsiarovana

ICT4D Specialist, Catholic Relief Servces (CRS)
Tohera Razafitsiarovana is an ICT4D Specialist for CRS-Madagascar.



Thursday May 19, 2016 14:45 - 15:30
Giraffe 203

14:45

Case Study: Data Protection in e-Voucher Systems
Limited Capacity filling up

In collaboration with the Electronic Learning Action Network (ELAN) and Mercy Corps, CRS is participating in an assessment of two e-voucher implementations of the Red Rose's ONEcard platform in Nigeria. The assessment mapped data flows and practices and provided recommendations based on Data Protection best practice published by the Cash Learning Partnership (CaLP).

This presentation will explore the CaLP Data Protection guidance, the results of the assessment, and the recommendations for improvement of data management and protection. A primary focus of this presentation will be to share resultant artifacts and lessons learned to aid participants in appropriately setting up and securing e-voucher systems in emergency settings.

Speakers
avatar for Joel Urbanowicz

Joel Urbanowicz

Director, Information Security & ICT Process Governance, Catholic Relief Services
Joel Urbanowicz is Director of Information Security and ICT Process Governance in the Global Knowledge and Information Management (GKIM) organization at Catholic Relief Services. He received a B.A. degree in Communications from Michigan State University and an M.S. in Information... Read More →



Thursday May 19, 2016 14:45 - 15:30
Giraffe 202