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The annual ICT4D Conferences have proven to be an invaluable opportunity for NGOs, private sector organizations, universities, governmental agencies and foundations to share their experience in using ICT to increase the impact of development programs and to learn from each other.  In 2016, 715 individuals from 76 countries and 301 private sector and public sector and civil society explored the ways to harness the full power of digital solutions to achieve the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals.  Our thanks to Accenture, Catholic Relief Services, Esri, Hewlett Packard Enterprise, iMerit Technology Services, Inmarsat, IS Solutions, Making All Voices Count, Mercy Corps, Microsoft, NetHope, Oxfam, Pandexio, Qualcom Wireless Reach, RTI International, SimbaNet and World Vision for making that possible.

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03- Health [clear filter]
Monday, May 16
 

10:45

Achieving Economies of Scale with a Common Digital Health Solution in Africa/Asia
Limited Capacity full

For over eight years, World Vision has advanced mHealth as a health and community systems strengthening tool. The World Vision mHealth portfolio has active deployments supporting community health workers (CHWs) and health facility staff in 16 different countries in Africa, South and Southeast Asia.

To support many of these projects, World Vision has invested in the development of a common set of applications built within the mHealth solution, MoTECH Suite. This has been made possible through a partnership with solution providers Dimagi and Grameen Foundation supported by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. The common platform offers an open source software solution tailored to meet the needs of five different World Vision health and nutrition project models or approaches. Using these five global applications as the starting point, the solution application is contextualised in close consultation with Ministry of Health (MOH) counterparts and users at the national and field levels.

World Vision mHealth projects are all working towards transitioning into scale-up phase once consensus and shared commitment to a solution or a package of solutions is reached among key national stakeholders - governments, local mobile network operators (MNOs), and MOH leadership chief among them.

Speakers
avatar for Martha Newsome

Martha Newsome

Vice President, Sustainable Health, World Vision International
Martha Holley Newsome is responsible for World Vision International’s Sustainable Health global programme group, including food, nutrition, HIV&AIDS, and water, sanitation and hygiene. She has a Masters of Public Health from the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health... Read More →



Monday May 16, 2016 10:45 - 11:30
Giraffe 210

10:45

CreativeMapper and SDG Youth Action Mapper: How Creative Is Integrating Mapping and GIS Tech into Development Work
Limited Capacity seats available

In the development sector it has been standard for enumerators from outside a community to enter that community, extract data and not return any of the information from the data collection. The rapid adoption of mobile devices in developing countries now allows for data collection and analysis to not only be more rapid and more frequent, but to also be more participatory and inclusive. To empower community-based data collection and mapping, Creative has developed the CreativeMapper toolkit. Citizens, particularly youth, have been trained on how to use the toolkit to gather information important their community's development and to make that data easily accessible on a public map.

To support the massive data collection needs of the SDGs, Creative has used its CreativeMapper toolkit to develop the SDG Youth Action Mapper (SDG YAM) model. For SDG YAM, Creative and its partners will be mobilizing and training youth to map opportunities for taking action on the SDGs using their mobile devices. Youth will identify volunteer opportunities that contribute to the realization of the 17 goals. The map of SDG action opportunities will allow other youth to find ways to contribute to the development of their country. The Points of Contact for the opportunities that have been mapped will use CreativeMapper to report regularly on the number of hours youth have volunteered toward the SDG goals and the results of this volunteer time. SDG YAM is changing how development is done by putting youth in charge of identifying opportunities and taking action toward the development of their countries and having their efforts logged and counted toward the realization of development goals. 

Speakers
avatar for Ayan Kishore

Ayan Kishore

Director, Creative Development Lab, Creative Associates International
Ayan Kishore is a social entrepreneur who has successfully built, grown and sold technology companies. At Creative Associates International, he leads the Creative Development Lab in the application of technology in development programs in education, violence prevention, workforce... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 10:45 - 11:30
Giraffe 208

10:45

Use of Electronic Sensors to Improve the Effectiveness of Environmental Health Interventions In Developing Countries
Limited Capacity filling up

Cellar reporting sensors may provide feedback on the sustainability of interventions in developing communities, improving on survey data and infrequent spot checks to assess performance. This presentation will profile several example applications of remotely reporting sensors to assess the proper operation and use of environmental health interventions.

In one recent study in Bangladesh, for instance, our instruments demonstrated more than a 50 percent exaggeration of latrine use compared to household surveys. That result may enable funders and development engineers to rethink how they implement sanitation programs.

In another example, in 2014 we worked on a project to install about 200 sensors in rural water pumps in Rwanda. The purpose was to identify pumps that were broken in order to dispatch repair teams. According to a survey, before the sensors were installed some 44 percent of the area's pumps were broken at any given time, and it took an average of about seven months to get a pump repaired. After the sensors were in place, the repair interval was reduced to just 26 days; consequently, only 9 percent of pumps were broken at a time.

We also evaluated whether awareness of sensors would impact household use of water filters or cookstoves in rural Rwanda. Turns out, there was a dramatic impact: a nearly 63 percent increase in the use of water filters in the first week, which declined slowly over the subsequent four weeks.

Working with CRS in Kenya, our team is presently installing sensors and developing management systems for rural water points.

Speakers
avatar for Katie Fankhauser

Katie Fankhauser

East Africa Program Manager, SweetSense, Inc.
Katie Fankhauser earned a degree in Environmental Studies at the University of Kansas in 2013. Katie is a full time program manager for SweetSense Inc. working in Rwanda, Kenya and Ethiopia, while pursuing a Masters in Public Health within the OHSU / PSU School of Public Health... Read More →
avatar for Styvers Kathuni

Styvers Kathuni

Program Manager - WASH, Catholic Relief Services
Styvers is the head of the WASH unit at CRS Kenya with over 8 years’ experience in designing and implementing WASH emergency and development projects. He has extensive experience with innovative approaches in water point operation and maintenance. Currently, he also oversees Kenya... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 10:45 - 11:30
Giraffe 211

11:30

Achieving Economies of Scale with a Common Digital Health Solution in Africa/Asia
Limited Capacity seats available

For over eight years, World Vision has advanced mHealth as a health and community systems strengthening tool. The World Vision mHealth portfolio has active deployments supporting community health workers (CHWs) and health facility staff in 16 different countries in Africa, South and Southeast Asia.

To support many of these projects, World Vision has invested in the development of a common set of applications built within the mHealth solution, MoTECH Suite. This has been made possible through a partnership with solution providers Dimagi and Grameen Foundation supported by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. The common platform offers an open source software solution tailored to meet the needs of five different World Vision health and nutrition project models or approaches. Using these five global applications as the starting point, the solution application is contextualised in close consultation with Ministry of Health (MOH) counterparts and users at the national and field levels.

World Vision mHealth projects are all working towards transitioning into scale-up phase once consensus and shared commitment to a solution or a package of solutions is reached among key national stakeholders - governments, local mobile network operators (MNOs), and MOH leadership chief among them.

Speakers
avatar for Martha Newsome

Martha Newsome

Vice President, Sustainable Health, World Vision International
Martha Holley Newsome is responsible for World Vision International’s Sustainable Health global programme group, including food, nutrition, HIV&AIDS, and water, sanitation and hygiene. She has a Masters of Public Health from the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health... Read More →



Monday May 16, 2016 11:30 - 12:15
Giraffe 210

11:30

Use of Electronic Sensors to Improve the Effectiveness of Environmental Health Interventions In Developing Countries
Limited Capacity seats available

Cellar reporting sensors may provide feedback on the sustainability of interventions in developing communities, improving on survey data and infrequent spot checks to assess performance. This presentation will profile several example applications of remotely reporting sensors to assess the proper operation and use of environmental health interventions.

In one recent study in Bangladesh, for instance, our instruments demonstrated more than a 50 percent exaggeration of latrine use compared to household surveys. That result may enable funders and development engineers to rethink how they implement sanitation programs.

In another example, in 2014 we worked on a project to install about 200 sensors in rural water pumps in Rwanda. The purpose was to identify pumps that were broken in order to dispatch repair teams. According to a survey, before the sensors were installed some 44 percent of the area's pumps were broken at any given time, and it took an average of about seven months to get a pump repaired. After the sensors were in place, the repair interval was reduced to just 26 days; consequently, only 9 percent of pumps were broken at a time.

We also evaluated whether awareness of sensors would impact household use of water filters or cookstoves in rural Rwanda. Turns out, there was a dramatic impact: a nearly 63 percent increase in the use of water filters in the first week, which declined slowly over the subsequent four weeks.

Working with CRS in Kenya, our team is presently installing sensors and developing management systems for rural water points.

Speakers
avatar for Katie Fankhauser

Katie Fankhauser

East Africa Program Manager, SweetSense, Inc.
Katie Fankhauser earned a degree in Environmental Studies at the University of Kansas in 2013. Katie is a full time program manager for SweetSense Inc. working in Rwanda, Kenya and Ethiopia, while pursuing a Masters in Public Health within the OHSU / PSU School of Public Health... Read More →
avatar for Styvers Kathuni

Styvers Kathuni

Program Manager - WASH, Catholic Relief Services
Styvers is the head of the WASH unit at CRS Kenya with over 8 years’ experience in designing and implementing WASH emergency and development projects. He has extensive experience with innovative approaches in water point operation and maintenance. Currently, he also oversees Kenya... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 11:30 - 12:15
Giraffe 211

11:30

OpenSRP - a Fresh HCD-Based Approach to mHealth Being Scaled in Bangladesh, Indonesia and Pakistan (1.5 Hours)
Limited Capacity full

OpenSRP (Open Smart Register Platform) is a WHO/ UNICEF-supported platform for frontline health-workers (FHWs) that is being scaled up in Bangladesh by the Ministry of Health for a variety of health domains. Having learned from deficiencies of mHealth platforms in the past, OpenSRP has taken a fresh approach to empowering community health-workers using mobile devices. Most current mHealth technology solutions have a number of important deficiencies such as the following:
- many mHealth initiatives have focused on the data collection aspect of FHW's work and disregarded their needs for decision-making, prioritized interventions, targeted and customized communications etc.
- in an effort to focus primarily on FHWs, the needs of the supervisory layer of FHWs have often been by-passed or de-prioritized in many mHealth initiatives thus leading to lack of appropriate incentive structures in the health system as a whole to adopt mHealth
- the "form-based" approach taken by most mHealth platforms presents a very different orientation to the one that FHWs are generally accustomed to where they fill up individual beneficiary information in rows and columns
- most mHealth platforms are not integrated with national health information systems such as DHIS2

OpenSRP offers a completely fresh approach to creating an mHealth platform using human-centered design principles, taking the above issues into consideration, and trying to mimic the workflow of a typical FHW and the physical orientation of manual register books.

The Bangladesh government has already adopted OpenSRP for a number of health domains and will likely scale it up nationally in the next few years. This presentation will highlight the unique approach taken by OpenSRP having learned from previous deficiencies and the lessons learned in gradual scale-up of OpenSRP implementation in Bangladesh.

Moderators
avatar for Mridul Chowdhury

Mridul Chowdhury

CEO, mPower Social Enterprises Ltd.
Mridul Chowdhury has extensive experience in development and technology innovation in developing countries. He is the Founder and CEO of mPower Social Enterprises, a global company specializing in the use of mobile phones for innovative social & public health applications. He has... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Matt Berg

Matt Berg

CEO, Ona
Based in Nairobi, Kenya Matt is CEO of Ona. Prior to co-founding Ona, Matt served as the ICT Director for Modi Research Group at Columbia University and was the country director for the Geekcorps' Mali program where his work focused on promoting ICT and information access in rural... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Alain Labrique

Dr. Alain Labrique

Director / Associate Professor, JHU Global mHealth Initiative
Dr. Alain Labrique is the founding director of the Johns Hopkins University Global mHealth Initiative, a multi-disciplinary consortium engaged in digital health innovation and research across the Johns Hopkins system. Labrique serves as an mHealth and Technical Advisor to several... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Garrett Mehl

Dr. Garrett Mehl

Scientist, World Health Organization
Dr. Garrett Mehl leads work on digital innovations for reproductive, maternal and child health at WHO. This includes evidence synthesis as manager of the WHO Technical and Evidence Review Group on mHealth for Reproductive, Maternal, Newborn and Child Health (mTERG), and as WHO implementation... Read More →
SM

Shama Mohammed

Country Director, Pakistan, Interactive Research and Development
Shama Mohammed is the Country Director for Pakistan at IRD, one of the founding organizations of the THRIVE consortium, and is part of the team that is rolling out OpenSRP in Pakistan. Previously she has participated in an mHealth project to track a cohort of children during their... Read More →
DA

Dr. Anuraj Shankar

Senior Research Scientist, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
Dr. Anuraj Shankar (DSc) is a Senior Research Scientist at the Harvard University T.H. Chan School of Public Health and key advisor to digital health implementations globally. Dr. Shankar's current areas of interest relate to building local capacity for use of data in decision-making... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 11:30 - 13:00
Giraffe 208

12:15

Making mHealth Solutions Count in DCs amidst Challenges
Limited Capacity seats available

World Vision's AIM Health project funded by Irish Aid through the Ireland office uses the timed and targeted Counseling (ttC) strategy through a MoTECH suite enabled mHealth application to improve maternal and newborn and child health. The mHealth project with support from World Vision US has outfitted CHWs with MoTECH suite ttC application enabled s devices to address MNCH issues in the project catchment area. The scale of the mHealth deployment is one of the largest in Uganda with over 896 CHWs. Results forthcoming overtime are indicative of the good progress and potential impact of the solution as an efficient, quality guaranteeing resource for community health system strengthening.
At this forum we shall share with the august audience the structural and infrastructural challenges and looming gaps encountered in piloting and rolling out an ICT4D mHealth intervention and how we have managed to harness result amidst these challenges. We will share success and what this success looks like in the face ideal ICT4D implementation logic. We will delve into resourcing and planning needs, stakeholder engagements with MoH and other partners to address alignment to national strategy and systematic and strategic integration for sustainability including other opportunities for scaling. We will share practices adopted and adapted at nation level to guarantee results as we seek to use this opportunity to learn from the wealth of knowledge present at the forum.

Speakers
avatar for Joel Fred Nsumba

Joel Fred Nsumba

mHealth Coordinator, World Vision Uganda
Joel Fred Nsumba is the mHealth Coordinator at world Vision Uganda. He has over 9 year experience in Statistical Computing, Health, women and child programming and implementation, monitoring and evaluation. Over the years, Joel has garnered lots of experience in implementing, Monitoring... Read More →



Monday May 16, 2016 12:15 - 13:00
Giraffe 210

12:15

Use of Electronic Sensors to Improve the Effectiveness of Environmental Health Interventions In Developing Countries
Limited Capacity seats available

Cellar reporting sensors may provide feedback on the sustainability of interventions in developing communities, improving on survey data and infrequent spot checks to assess performance. This presentation will profile several example applications of remotely reporting sensors to assess the proper operation and use of environmental health interventions.

In one recent study in Bangladesh, for instance, our instruments demonstrated more than a 50 percent exaggeration of latrine use compared to household surveys. That result may enable funders and development engineers to rethink how they implement sanitation programs.

In another example, in 2014 we worked on a project to install about 200 sensors in rural water pumps in Rwanda. The purpose was to identify pumps that were broken in order to dispatch repair teams. According to a survey, before the sensors were installed some 44 percent of the area's pumps were broken at any given time, and it took an average of about seven months to get a pump repaired. After the sensors were in place, the repair interval was reduced to just 26 days; consequently, only 9 percent of pumps were broken at a time.

We also evaluated whether awareness of sensors would impact household use of water filters or cookstoves in rural Rwanda. Turns out, there was a dramatic impact: a nearly 63 percent increase in the use of water filters in the first week, which declined slowly over the subsequent four weeks.

Working with CRS in Kenya, our team is presently installing sensors and developing management systems for rural water points.

Speakers
avatar for Katie Fankhauser

Katie Fankhauser

East Africa Program Manager, SweetSense, Inc.
Katie Fankhauser earned a degree in Environmental Studies at the University of Kansas in 2013. Katie is a full time program manager for SweetSense Inc. working in Rwanda, Kenya and Ethiopia, while pursuing a Masters in Public Health within the OHSU / PSU School of Public Health... Read More →
avatar for Styvers Kathuni

Styvers Kathuni

Program Manager - WASH, Catholic Relief Services
Styvers is the head of the WASH unit at CRS Kenya with over 8 years’ experience in designing and implementing WASH emergency and development projects. He has extensive experience with innovative approaches in water point operation and maintenance. Currently, he also oversees Kenya... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 12:15 - 13:00
Giraffe 211

14:00

Designing a Mobile Partograph for Safer Maternal Deliveries
Limited Capacity seats available

Prolonged and obstructed labor is one of the leading causes of maternal and newborn mortality. The partograph, a one-page paper form, has been universally recommended by WHO since 1994 as an effective tool for the early detection of complications during labor, thereby reducing prolonged labor, intrapartum stillbirths, and emergency caesarean sections. While it has been hailed as a highly effective, low-cost method of reducing maternal and fetal mortality, the adoption of the partograph remains low in low-resource settings despite decades of training and investment. Health providers find the graph format and its instructions too complex to follow.

To address these challenges, Dimagi developed a mobile application version of the partograph, called "mLabour," built on Dimagi's mHealth platform, CommCare. Designed to significantly reduce health workers' workload, mLabour - piloted in India in early 2015 at the Abdul Hakeem Centenary Hospital - features built-in clinical protocols that detect and manage abnormal labor progress, automatic graphing, reminders to conduct timely patient exams, messaging capabilities to notify staff of emergency cases, and web-based reports for supervisors and administrators. Initial results showed a reduction in the number of patients who were neglected (100% births had a mobile partograph completed, compared to 12.5% on paper) and in follow-up time.

In this presentation, Dimagi's Carla Legros will describe the process of designing and developing the mLabour application and present the evaluation methodologies and results that came out of the pilot. Participants will learn about the unique challenges and considerations that come with designing and piloting ICT tools for intrapartum care in low-resource clinical settings.

Speakers
avatar for Carla Legros

Carla Legros

Project Manager, Dimagi
Carla Legros is a Project Manager at Dimagi and has worked on over 10 ICT4D projects in Africa, developing and supporting clients in launch mobile tools for health services. Primarily her work has been in nutrition, designing applications to screen, treat and provide recommendations... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 14:00 - 14:45
Giraffe 208

14:00

Making mHealth Solutions Count in DCs amidst Challenges
Limited Capacity seats available

World Vision's AIM Health project funded by Irish Aid through the Ireland office uses the timed and targeted Counseling (ttC) strategy through a MoTECH suite enabled mHealth application to improve maternal and newborn and child health. The mHealth project with support from World Vision US has outfitted CHWs with MoTECH suite ttC application enabled s devices to address MNCH issues in the project catchment area. The scale of the mHealth deployment is one of the largest in Uganda with over 896 CHWs. Results forthcoming overtime are indicative of the good progress and potential impact of the solution as an efficient, quality guaranteeing resource for community health system  strengthening.
At this forum we shall share with the august audience the structural and infrastructural challenges and looming gaps encountered in piloting and rolling out an ICT4D mHealth intervention and how we have managed to harness result amidst these challenges. We will share success and what this success looks like in the face ideal ICT4D implementation logic. We will delve into resourcing and planning needs, stakeholder engagements with MoH and other partners to address alignment to national strategy and systematic and strategic integration for sustainability including other opportunities for scaling. We will share practices adopted and adapted at nation level to guarantee results as we seek to use this opportunity to learn from the wealth of knowledge present at the forum.

Speakers
avatar for Joel Fred Nsumba

Joel Fred Nsumba

mHealth Coordinator, World Vision Uganda
Joel Fred Nsumba is the mHealth Coordinator at world Vision Uganda. He has over 9 year experience in Statistical Computing, Health, women and child programming and implementation, monitoring and evaluation. Over the years, Joel has garnered lots of experience in implementing, Monitoring... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 14:00 - 14:45
Giraffe 210

14:00

Mobile Technology for Health in Ghana (MOTECH): Overview of Platform Message Delivery and User Response
Limited Capacity full

The Mobile Technology for Health platform delivers two interrelated mobile applications in Ghana - "Mobile Midwife" and the "Client Data Application". Mobile Midwife enables pregnant women to receive pre-recorded voice messages on their mobile phones that provide time-specific pregnancy information. The Client Data Application enabled frontline health workers to use mobile phones to electronically record care given to patients and identify women and infants in their area that are due or overdue for care. In this presentation, we review data on message delivery and user response across study sites and over time from 2011-2014. Findings suggest that less than 50% of expected messages were delivered. 63% to 91% of women who received messages during pregnancy and/or postpartum were listened to; where listening is defined as having to listen to at least 50% the length of each message. Among pregnant women, almost 90% chose to listen to messages received; however, postpartum rates of active listening decline significantly over time. By thematic area, the highest interest in messages were around routine care seeking during pregnancy care and help during emergencies.

Speakers
DA

Dr. Amnesty LeFevre

Assistant Scientist, Johns Hopkins School of Public Health
Monitoring and Evaluation of digital health programs | Design and implementation of maternal newborn and child health programs in low and middle income countries | Economic evaluation


Monday May 16, 2016 14:00 - 14:45
Giraffe 211

14:45

Designing a Mobile Partograph for Safer Maternal Deliveries
Limited Capacity seats available

Prolonged and obstructed labor is one of the leading causes of maternal and newborn mortality. The partograph, a one-page paper form, has been universally recommended by WHO since 1994 as an effective tool for the early detection of complications during labor, thereby reducing prolonged labor, intrapartum stillbirths, and emergency caesarean sections. While it has been hailed as a highly effective, low-cost method of reducing maternal and fetal mortality, the adoption of the partograph remains low in low-resource settings despite decades of training and investment. Health providers find the graph format and its instructions too complex to follow.

To address these challenges, Dimagi developed a mobile application version of the partograph, called "mLabour," built on Dimagi's mHealth platform, CommCare. Designed to significantly reduce health workers' workload, mLabour - piloted in India in early 2015 at the Abdul Hakeem Centenary Hospital - features built-in clinical protocols that detect and manage abnormal labor progress, automatic graphing, reminders to conduct timely patient exams, messaging capabilities to notify staff of emergency cases, and web-based reports for supervisors and administrators. Initial results showed a reduction in the number of patients who were neglected (100% births had a mobile partograph completed, compared to 12.5% on paper) and in follow-up time.

In this presentation, Dimagi's Carla Legros will describe the process of designing and developing the mLabour application and present the evaluation methodologies and results that came out of the pilot. Participants will learn about the unique challenges and considerations that come with designing and piloting ICT tools for intrapartum care in low-resource clinical settings.

Speakers
avatar for Carla Legros

Carla Legros

Project Manager, Dimagi
Carla Legros is a Project Manager at Dimagi and has worked on over 10 ICT4D projects in Africa, developing and supporting clients in launch mobile tools for health services. Primarily her work has been in nutrition, designing applications to screen, treat and provide recommendations... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 14:45 - 15:30
Giraffe 208

14:45

Making mHealth Solutions Count in DCs amidst Challenges
Limited Capacity seats available

World Vision's AIM Health project funded by Irish Aid through the Ireland office uses the timed and targeted Counseling (ttC) strategy through a MoTECH suite enabled mHealth application to improve maternal and newborn and child health. The mHealth project with support from World Vision US has outfitted CHWs with MoTECH suite ttC application enabled s devices to address MNCH issues in the project catchment area. The scale of the mHealth deployment is one of the largest in Uganda with over 896 CHWs. Results forthcoming overtime are indicative of the good progress and potential impact of the solution as an efficient, quality guaranteeing resource for community health system strengthening.
At this forum we shall share with the august audience the structural and infrastructural challenges and looming gaps encountered in piloting and rolling out an ICT4D mHealth intervention and how we have managed to harness result amidst these challenges. We will share success and what this success looks like in the face ideal ICT4D implementation logic. We will delve into resourcing and planning needs, stakeholder engagements with MoH and other partners to address alignment to national strategy and systematic and strategic integration for sustainability including other opportunities for scaling. We will share practices adopted and adapted at nation level to guarantee results as we seek to use this opportunity to learn from the wealth of knowledge present at the forum.

Speakers
avatar for Joel Fred Nsumba

Joel Fred Nsumba

mHealth Coordinator, World Vision Uganda
Joel Fred Nsumba is the mHealth Coordinator at world Vision Uganda. He has over 9 year experience in Statistical Computing, Health, women and child programming and implementation, monitoring and evaluation. Over the years, Joel has garnered lots of experience in implementing, Monitoring... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 14:45 - 15:30
Giraffe 210

14:45

Mobile Technology for Health in Ghana (MOTECH): Overview of Platform Message Delivery and User Response
Limited Capacity full

The Mobile Technology for Health platform delivers two interrelated mobile applications in Ghana - "Mobile Midwife" and the "Client Data Application". Mobile Midwife enables pregnant women to receive pre-recorded voice messages on their mobile phones that provide time-specific pregnancy information. The Client Data Application enabled frontline health workers to use mobile phones to electronically record care given to patients and identify women and infants in their area that are due or overdue for care. In this presentation, we review data on message delivery and user response across study sites and over time from 2011-2014. Findings suggest that less than 50% of expected messages were delivered. 63% to 91% of women who received messages during pregnancy and/or postpartum were listened to; where listening is defined as having to listen to at least 50% the length of each message. Among pregnant women, almost 90% chose to listen to messages received; however, postpartum rates of active listening decline significantly over time. By thematic area, the highest interest in messages were around routine care seeking during pregnancy care and help during emergencies.

Speakers
DA

Dr. Amnesty LeFevre

Assistant Scientist, Johns Hopkins School of Public Health
Monitoring and Evaluation of digital health programs | Design and implementation of maternal newborn and child health programs in low and middle income countries | Economic evaluation


Monday May 16, 2016 14:45 - 15:30
Giraffe 211

16:00

Harnessing Digital Networks to Reach Newborns and Strengthen Postnatal Care
Limited Capacity filling up

Neonatal mortality contributes to over 55% of under 5 child deaths in Bangladesh. In rural northwest Bangladesh, 85% of births
occur at home and only 27% receive any postnatal care (PNC) by a trained provider within 2 days of childbirth, a practice considered
essential to the health of mother and the vulnerable neonate. More than 20% infants are born preterm, and nearly half are low birth weight - unprepared to encounter the many challenges home-based
deliveries present. Essential newborn care can maximize chances of survival and identify critical danger signs in these vulnerable infants.
Methods: A comprehensive system called mCARE allowed community health workers (CHWs) to conduct digital pregnancy surveillance of 11,836 women, enroll pregnant women (n=800) and report birth outcomes digitally (including miscarriage, live births and stillbirths). Families in the intervention group (n=400) received two SMS reminders to access postnatal (PNC) and essential newborn care (ENC), their CHW was reminded to promote PNC near the time it was due. The comparison group received no targeted reminders by CHW or mobile message. Data collectors conducted verification visits to assess PNC and ENC utilization in both groups.
Results: 70% of women in the mobile group received PNC, compared to 40% in the control group. Women who did not receive PNC, (42%) in
control group and (4%) in mobile group, reported lack of time and distance as barriers, apparently removed by the mobile reminder, since services were not more distant compared to those in the intervention group. Danger signs were higher among women in control group (71.9%) than mHealth group (32.5%). 99.2% of newborns in mHealth group vs. 89.8% in control
group were immediately breastfed.
Conclusion: Women and newborns in the mHealth group were 2+ times more likely to receive PNC and reported having significantly fewer danger signs and improved outcomes.The integrated mCARE system improved timeliness, coverage and utilization of PNC and ENC in the mCARE
group, opening up the potential for delivery of essential neonatal intervention and averting preventable newborn deaths through immediate care and referral.

Speakers
avatar for Dr. Alain Labrique

Dr. Alain Labrique

Director / Associate Professor, JHU Global mHealth Initiative
Dr. Alain Labrique is the founding director of the Johns Hopkins University Global mHealth Initiative, a multi-disciplinary consortium engaged in digital health innovation and research across the Johns Hopkins system. Labrique serves as an mHealth and Technical Advisor to several... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 16:00 - 16:45
Giraffe 208

16:00

mHealth Tools for Malnutrition Screening and Follow-up in Low-Resource Settings: Learning's from Kenya deployment
Limited Capacity seats available

Delivering interventions for acute malnutrition in low-resource settings is an arduous endeavor. Beyond the effort of managing the sheer caseloads, other challenges faced include logistics, stock management, development and enforcement of protocols, high turnover of service-providers, limited visibility into the magnitude of the problem and, subsequently, of their impact. Having a tool that could provide and centralized solutions for several of these challenges could and has proven useful to several organizations. This aim of this abstract is to share the experiences of Save the Children in using mobile health to begin to address some of the aforementioned challenges in Kenya.
Project implementation: Starting in 2014, World Vision Canada and Save the Children partnered with Dimagi an organization involved in developing mobile health applications designed as job-aides for health workers for Integrated Management of Acute Malnutrition (IMAM). This happened in a consortium and is being undertaken in four countries namely Kenya, Niger, Chad and Mali. In this agreement Dimagi would integrate the World Health Organization (WHO) protocol into an algorithm that enforces the global malnutrition treatment protocols that health centers should follow. Reflecting a decision-tree, the application guides clinic staff through screening for malnutrition, classifies the degree of the illness, prompts recommendations for treatment and counseling, and automatically lists beneficiaries into groups for follow-up. On the back-end, viewable by program staff, the application generates both granular data about each visit for every beneficiary (pregnant or lactating women, or children under five) as well as global data, for trends across the intervention areas.
In Kenya deployment started in January 2015, the IMAM application was assessed and adapted to the Kenyan Context in line with IMAM guidelines from the application made for Niger. Following a scoping visit made in Wajir, the original application was modified and contextualized. The modification factored inputs from local health protocols, Z-Score calculations auto-generated by the mobile platform, locally-vetted, personalized counseling messages in multiple languages and dialects, as well as culturally-relevant images. The prototype was then tested with select users and refined before training and launching in selected health clinics. The entire process took about 10 months and actual use of the application was in November 2015. So far using the application health workers have been able to reach 131 Pregnant and lactating women and 118 (60M, 58F) children in the Outpatient Treatment Program (OTP) and 156 (75M, 81F) children in Supplementary Feeding Center (SFP).
Methodology: In order to generate evidence, an evaluation using the Randomized Control Cluster Trial method is being done to run concurrently with the pilot implementation. An initial baseline assessment was undertaken, which was followed by a random selection of 20 health facilities from three sub counties (Wajir County (Wajir East, Wajir South and Tarbaj). The health facilities were stratified by sub-county and mobile signal strength and provided with mobile devices with the application. The remaining 25 health facilities in the three sub-counties continue to use the paper based system so as to act as comparison sites. In order to monitor the project, periodic observations will be conducted to compare quality of care in intervention and non-intervention sites together with prospective and historical data collection completeness, timeliness and quality.
Findings: The project implementation is still underway but the following have are the key learning's in so far;
- Field test and retesting of the application with end users (front line health workers) is vital
- Working in a consortium is more beneficial than working as a single entity, as lessons learn between contexts and implementing partners can be maximized.
- Its beneficial to work with a technology partner specialized in working in mHealth in low resource contexts since then you leverage on their experience
- While sensitization and involvement of Ministry of Health (MoH) is critical, it is a time consuming process.
- Evidence generation for learning and informing program implementation is crucial however, it is complex to implement and integrate with the pilot
Conclusions and implications: The quality of care and data potential of the mHealth application has not yet been sufficiently exploited since the program is still on going. Findings from the evaluation will answer questions on the applications potential for improvement of quality of care and empowerment of health workers in better management of acute malnutrition.
Acknowledgement: The project was funded by the USAID Office of U.S. Foreign Disaster Assistance (USAID/OFDA) through World Vision.

Speakers
avatar for Caroline Kimere

Caroline Kimere

Child Survival Research and Learning Coordinator, Save the Childre
Caroline Njeri Kimere, Child Survival Research and Learning Coordinator, Email: Caroline.Kimere@savethechildren.org, Save the Children - Kenya Programme Ms Kimere is a nutritionist with over 8 years' experience and is undertaking a Master's Degree in Public Health from the University... Read More →



Monday May 16, 2016 16:00 - 16:45
Giraffe 210

16:00

OpenSRP Tech and Implementation Overview
Limited Capacity filling up

WHO's Open Smart Register Platform (OpenSRP) is an open-source platform that supports frontline health workers (FHWs) in low-and-middle-income countries to digitally register and track health-events and services. The OpenSRP application deploys on Android tablets and leverages the robust backend of OpenMRS for storing patient medical records. The platform uses the XLSForm standard for authoring forms and Enketo webforms for data entry. Ona has been working with teams across three OpenSRP country-sites to map the public health community health data elements of FHWs into the global CIEL dictionary, contributing significant new concepts into the dictionary. Since forms are mapped with OpenMRS concept ID mappings, it allows the data collected in the community to be automatically transmitted to OpenMRS and stored inside the patient's medical record, which allows for the continuity of care as patients travel from their communities to tertiary health facilities for care. To facilitate those who wish to leverage OpenSRP for strengthening FHW health performance and accountability, we have developed protocols and communities of practice around mapping data and workflows, and developing technical requirements, for teams to successfully adapt and deploy OpenSRP in their own countries to catalyze health system strengthening, monitoring and achievement of the health SDGs. Participants will learn how to start using OpenSRP, and its comparison with other health ICT tools.

Speakers
avatar for Matt Berg

Matt Berg

CEO, Ona
Based in Nairobi, Kenya Matt is CEO of Ona. Prior to co-founding Ona, Matt served as the ICT Director for Modi Research Group at Columbia University and was the country director for the Geekcorps' Mali program where his work focused on promoting ICT and information access in rural... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 16:00 - 16:45
Giraffe 211

16:45

Harnessing Digital Networks to Reach Newborns and Strengthen Postnatal Care
Limited Capacity seats available

Neonatal mortality contributes to over 55% of under 5 child deaths in Bangladesh. In rural northwest Bangladesh, 85% of births
occur at home and only 27% receive any postnatal care (PNC) by a trained provider within 2 days of childbirth, a practice considered
essential to the health of mother and the vulnerable neonate. More than 20% infants are born preterm, and nearly half are low birth weight - unprepared to encounter the many challenges home-based
deliveries present. Essential newborn care can maximize chances of survival and identify critical danger signs in these vulnerable infants.
Methods: A comprehensive system called mCARE allowed community health workers (CHWs) to conduct digital pregnancy surveillance of 11,836 women, enroll pregnant women (n=800) and report birth outcomes digitally (including miscarriage, live births and stillbirths). Families in the intervention group (n=400) received two SMS reminders to access postnatal (PNC) and essential newborn care (ENC), their CHW was reminded to promote PNC near the time it was due. The comparison group received no targeted reminders by CHW or mobile message. Data collectors conducted verification visits to assess PNC and ENC utilization in both groups.
Results: 70% of women in the mobile group received PNC, compared to 40% in the control group. Women who did not receive PNC, (42%) in
control group and (4%) in mobile group, reported lack of time and distance as barriers, apparently removed by the mobile reminder, since services were not more distant compared to those in the intervention group. Danger signs were higher among women in control group (71.9%) than mHealth group (32.5%). 99.2% of newborns in mHealth group vs. 89.8% in control
group were immediately breastfed.
Conclusion: Women and newborns in the mHealth group were 2+ times more likely to receive PNC and reported having significantly fewer danger signs and improved outcomes.The integrated mCARE system improved timeliness, coverage and utilization of PNC and ENC in the mCARE
group, opening up the potential for delivery of essential neonatal intervention and averting preventable newborn deaths through immediate care and referral.

Speakers
avatar for Dr. Alain Labrique

Dr. Alain Labrique

Director / Associate Professor, JHU Global mHealth Initiative
Dr. Alain Labrique is the founding director of the Johns Hopkins University Global mHealth Initiative, a multi-disciplinary consortium engaged in digital health innovation and research across the Johns Hopkins system. Labrique serves as an mHealth and Technical Advisor to several... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 16:45 - 17:30
Giraffe 208

16:45

mHealth Tools for Malnutrition Screening and Follow-up in Low-Resource Settings: Learning's from Kenya deployment
Limited Capacity seats available

Delivering interventions for acute malnutrition in low-resource settings is an arduous endeavor. Beyond the effort of managing the sheer caseloads, other challenges faced include logistics, stock management, development and enforcement of protocols, high turnover of service-providers, limited visibility into the magnitude of the problem and, subsequently, of their impact. Having a tool that could provide and centralized solutions for several of these challenges could and has proven useful to several organizations. This aim of this abstract is to share the experiences of Save the Children in using mobile health to begin to address some of the aforementioned challenges in Kenya.
Project implementation: Starting in 2014, World Vision Canada and Save the Children partnered with Dimagi an organization involved in developing mobile health applications designed as job-aides for health workers for Integrated Management of Acute Malnutrition (IMAM). This happened in a consortium and is being undertaken in four countries namely Kenya, Niger, Chad and Mali. In this agreement Dimagi would integrate the World Health Organization (WHO) protocol into an algorithm that enforces the global malnutrition treatment protocols that health centers should follow. Reflecting a decision-tree, the application guides clinic staff through screening for malnutrition, classifies the degree of the illness, prompts recommendations for treatment and counseling, and automatically lists beneficiaries into groups for follow-up. On the back-end, viewable by program staff, the application generates both granular data about each visit for every beneficiary (pregnant or lactating women, or children under five) as well as global data, for trends across the intervention areas.
In Kenya deployment started in January 2015, the IMAM application was assessed and adapted to the Kenyan Context in line with IMAM guidelines from the application made for Niger. Following a scoping visit made in Wajir, the original application was modified and contextualized. The modification factored inputs from local health protocols, Z-Score calculations auto-generated by the mobile platform, locally-vetted, personalized counseling messages in multiple languages and dialects, as well as culturally-relevant images. The prototype was then tested with select users and refined before training and launching in selected health clinics. The entire process took about 10 months and actual use of the application was in November 2015. So far using the application health workers have been able to reach 131 Pregnant and lactating women and 118 (60M, 58F) children in the Outpatient Treatment Program (OTP) and 156 (75M, 81F) children in Supplementary Feeding Center (SFP).
Methodology: In order to generate evidence, an evaluation using the Randomized Control Cluster Trial method is being done to run concurrently with the pilot implementation. An initial baseline assessment was undertaken, which was followed by a random selection of 20 health facilities from three sub counties (Wajir County (Wajir East, Wajir South and Tarbaj). The health facilities were stratified by sub-county and mobile signal strength and provided with mobile devices with the application. The remaining 25 health facilities in the three sub-counties continue to use the paper based system so as to act as comparison sites. In order to monitor the project, periodic observations will be conducted to compare quality of care in intervention and non-intervention sites together with prospective and historical data collection completeness, timeliness and quality.
Findings: The project implementation is still underway but the following have are the key learning's in so far;
- Field test and retesting of the application with end users (front line health workers) is vital
- Working in a consortium is more beneficial than working as a single entity, as lessons learn between contexts and implementing partners can be maximized.
- Its beneficial to work with a technology partner specialized in working in mHealth in low resource contexts since then you leverage on their experience
- While sensitization and involvement of Ministry of Health (MoH) is critical, it is a time consuming process.
- Evidence generation for learning and informing program implementation is crucial however, it is complex to implement and integrate with the pilot
Conclusions and implications: The quality of care and data potential of the mHealth application has not yet been sufficiently exploited since the program is still on going. Findings from the evaluation will answer questions on the applications potential for improvement of quality of care and empowerment of health workers in better management of acute malnutrition.
Acknowledgement: The project was funded by the USAID Office of U.S. Foreign Disaster Assistance (USAID/OFDA) through World Vision.

Speakers
avatar for Caroline Kimere

Caroline Kimere

Child Survival Research and Learning Coordinator, Save the Childre
Caroline Njeri Kimere, Child Survival Research and Learning Coordinator, Email: Caroline.Kimere@savethechildren.org, Save the Children - Kenya Programme Ms Kimere is a nutritionist with over 8 years' experience and is undertaking a Master's Degree in Public Health from the University... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 16:45 - 17:30
Giraffe 210

16:45

OpenSRP Tech and Implementation Overview
Limited Capacity seats available

WHO's Open Smart Register Platform (OpenSRP) is an open-source platform that supports frontline health workers (FHWs) in low-and-middle-income countries to digitally register and track health-events and services. The OpenSRP application deploys on Android tablets and leverages the robust backend of OpenMRS for storing patient medical records. The platform uses the XLSForm standard for authoring forms and Enketo webforms for data entry. Ona has been working with teams across three OpenSRP country-sites to map the public health community health data elements of FHWs into the global CIEL dictionary, contributing significant new concepts into the dictionary. Since forms are mapped with OpenMRS concept ID mappings, it allows the data collected in the community to be automatically transmitted to OpenMRS and stored inside the patient's medical record, which allows for the continuity of care as patients travel from their communities to tertiary health facilities for care. To facilitate those who wish to leverage OpenSRP for strengthening FHW health performance and accountability, we have developed protocols and communities of practice around mapping data and workflows, and developing technical requirements, for teams to successfully adapt and deploy OpenSRP in their own countries to catalyze health system strengthening, monitoring and achievement of the health SDGs. Participants will learn how to start using OpenSRP, and its comparison with other health ICT tools.

Speakers
avatar for Matt Berg

Matt Berg

CEO, Ona
Based in Nairobi, Kenya Matt is CEO of Ona. Prior to co-founding Ona, Matt served as the ICT Director for Modi Research Group at Columbia University and was the country director for the Geekcorps' Mali program where his work focused on promoting ICT and information access in rural... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 16:45 - 17:30
Giraffe 211
 
Tuesday, May 17
 

10:45

Challenges in Implementing National mHealth Solutions: The MomConnect Experience
Limited Capacity filling up

MomConnect is a South African National Department of Health (DOH) mHealth initiative that was launched in August 2014. The project aims to:-

· Register pregnant women into an electronic database connected to a national health information exchange,

· Send these women stage-based SMS messages for the duration of their pregnancy and up to 1 year after the birth of the child,

· Allow these women to ask questions about their pregnancy and childcare-related health issues and to provide feedback on the quality of care received,

· Provide nurses and midwives, who are providing maternal and infant services, with cell phone based support and relevant messages related to their work.

As of August 2015, over 500,000 women throughout South Africa had been registered on MomConnect and were receiving messages. Through the implementation of the project, the South African National Department of Health, and its partners have overcome many issues related to effective scaling of the project, stakeholder engagement and interoperability. The Department of Health has also started to use data from the MomConnect system to improve aspects of the health system. This presentation provides an overview of the MomConnect project, and highlights important elements contributing its successful nationwide scaling, including leadership, wide-scale partner buy-in, appropriate technical solutions and linkage with other initiatives. The presentation also details issues which still need to be overcome.

Speakers
DA

Dr. Antonio Fernandes

Momconnect project manager, South Africa National Department of Health
Dr Antonio Fernandes is a Medical doctor and epidemiologist who is the project manager of the South African Department of Health's MomConnect project. He has significant experience in implementing health information systems through his work at the state information technology agency... Read More →


Tuesday May 17, 2016 10:45 - 11:30
Giraffe 203

10:45

Faster than Mosquitoes: Mobile Tech & Malaria
Limited Capacity filling up

Just sixty five years ago malaria was a major problem in the United States. Massive spraying campaigns and expensive infrastructure investments eliminated this long standing problem in just a few years. In Zanzibar and many other places suffering from malaria, these same expensive approaches have been used and success achieved in the short term, only to have funding disappear and malaria incidence quickly return to endemic levels. In places where medicine and information move slowly over big distances and rough roads, malaria, flying along in mosquitoes and migrant workers quickly outpaces all but the best funded efforts to keep it from spreading.

Yet, technology brings hope. Mobile phone signals travel even faster than mosquitoes. Capturing data about malaria cases from health clinics via interactive SMS and then quickly sending health workers with GPS equipped tablets to map and then treat infected households and their neighbors is proving to be a cost-effective way to keep malaria cases from spreading. In Zanzibar, twenty health workers equipped with inexpensive tablets and a motorbike are keeping malaria prevalance at less than 1% - a steady and sustained decrease from more than 35% just 15 years ago.

This approach is working in Zanzibar. Can it work in places that aren't islands? Can it work with other diseases? How can timely information help address other challenges in public health, education and governance?

Speakers
avatar for Michael McKay

Michael McKay

Technologist, RTI International
Mike McKay is a technology optimist living in Nairobi. He has spent the last twelve years applying technology to challenges in sub-Saharan Africa including financial inclusion, HIV care & treatment, diabetes & hypertension management, corruption reporting, malaria surveillance, early... Read More →


Tuesday May 17, 2016 10:45 - 11:30
Giraffe 204

10:45

Health Center by Phone: An Innovation for Achieving SDGs
Limited Capacity seats available

In Malawi, a woman has a one in 34 chance of dying during childbirth and 3% of newborns die in their first month. Facing a lack of access to reliable health information, long travel distances to health facilities and other barriers, women and caregivers of children may delay or avoid seeking care. Knowing when and where to go are critical to improving reproductive, maternal, neonatal and child health (RMNCH) outcomes.
To achieve Sustainable Development Goal 3, the health information gap must be addressed. Designed to improve information availability and appropriate care-seeking behavior, VillageReach, Airtel Malawi, and the Malawi Ministry of Health (MoH) operate Chipatala cha pa Foni (CCPF) or Health Center by Phone. CCPF has two main components:
1. A toll-free hotline staffed with health workers providing health information and advice.
2. A "tips and reminders" mobile messaging service providing weekly messages tailored to the client's week of pregnancy or a child's age.

CCPF has a statistically significant impact on MNCH knowledge and behavior. CCPF users show improvements in use of antenatal care within the first trimester, bed nets during pregnancy, early initiation of breastfeeding, and knowledge of healthy behaviors during pregnancy, such as avoiding harmful medicines. CCPF users trust the service and cite the ability to access health information from home, saving time, and saving travel costs, as key benefits.

CCPF recently merged with Airtel Malawi's Dial-A-Doc program to form Airtel CCPF, a zero-rated service providing health information and advice beyond RMNCH with physician triage ability. CCPF is now available in eight of Malawi's 28 districts. Under direction of the MoH, CCPF is expected to scale nationally by the end of 2017.

Speakers
ZJ

Zachariah Jezman

mHealth Programme Manager, VillageReach
Zachariah Jezman is the mHealth Programme Manager for VillageReach Malawi. He heads a Health Centre by phone service and mNutrition, a content development project. He is a member of the Reproductive and Maternal Health and mHealth Technical Working Groups of Malawi. Previously, he... Read More →


Tuesday May 17, 2016 10:45 - 11:30
Giraffe 202

11:30

Challenges in Implementing National mHealth Solutions: The MomConnect Experience
Limited Capacity seats available

MomConnect is a South African National Department of Health (DOH) mHealth initiative that was launched in August 2014. The project aims to:-

· Register pregnant women into an electronic database connected to a national health information exchange,

· Send these women stage-based SMS messages for the duration of their pregnancy and up to 1 year after the birth of the child,

· Allow these women to ask questions about their pregnancy and childcare-related health issues and to provide feedback on the quality of care received,

· Provide nurses and midwives, who are providing maternal and infant services, with cell phone based support and relevant messages related to their work.

As of August 2015, over 500,000 women throughout South Africa had been registered on MomConnect and were receiving messages. Through the implementation of the project, the South African National Department of Health, and its partners have overcome many issues related to effective scaling of the project, stakeholder engagement and interoperability. The Department of Health has also started to use data from the MomConnect system to improve aspects of the health system. This presentation provides an overview of the MomConnect project, and highlights important elements contributing its successful nationwide scaling, including leadership, wide-scale partner buy-in, appropriate technical solutions and linkage with other initiatives. The presentation also details issues which still need to be overcome.

Speakers
DA

Dr. Antonio Fernandes

Momconnect project manager, South Africa National Department of Health
Dr Antonio Fernandes is a Medical doctor and epidemiologist who is the project manager of the South African Department of Health's MomConnect project. He has significant experience in implementing health information systems through his work at the state information technology agency... Read More →


Tuesday May 17, 2016 11:30 - 12:15
Giraffe 203

11:30

Faster than Mosquitoes: Mobile Tech & Malaria
Limited Capacity filling up

Just sixty five years ago malaria was a major problem in the United States. Massive spraying campaigns and expensive infrastructure investments eliminated this long standing problem in just a few years. In Zanzibar and many other places suffering from malaria, these same expensive approaches have been used and success achieved in the short term, only to have funding disappear and malaria incidence quickly return to endemic levels. In places where medicine and information move slowly over big distances and rough roads, malaria, flying along in mosquitoes and migrant workers quickly outpaces all but the best funded efforts to keep it from spreading.

Yet, technology brings hope. Mobile phone signals travel even faster than mosquitoes. Capturing data about malaria cases from health clinics via interactive SMS and then quickly sending health workers with GPS equipped tablets to map and then treat infected households and their neighbors is proving to be a cost-effective way to keep malaria cases from spreading. In Zanzibar, twenty health workers equipped with inexpensive tablets and a motorbike are keeping malaria incidence at around 3% - a steady and sustained decrease from more than 80% just 15 years ago.

This approach is working in Zanzibar. Can it work in places that aren't islands? Can it work with other diseases? How can timely information help address other challenges in public health, education and governance?

Speakers
avatar for Michael McKay

Michael McKay

Technologist, RTI International
Mike McKay is a technology optimist living in Nairobi. He has spent the last twelve years applying technology to challenges in sub-Saharan Africa including financial inclusion, HIV care & treatment, diabetes & hypertension management, corruption reporting, malaria surveillance, early... Read More →


Tuesday May 17, 2016 11:30 - 12:15
Giraffe 204

11:30

Health Center by Phone: An Innovation for Achieving SDGs
Limited Capacity seats available

In Malawi, a woman has a one in 34 chance of dying during childbirth and 3% of newborns die in their first month. Facing a lack of access to reliable health information, long travel distances to health facilities and other barriers, women and caregivers of children may delay or avoid seeking care. Knowing when and where to go are critical to improving reproductive, maternal, neonatal and child health (RMNCH) outcomes.
To achieve Sustainable Development Goal 3, the health information gap must be addressed. Designed to improve information availability and appropriate care-seeking behavior, VillageReach, Airtel Malawi, and the Malawi Ministry of Health (MoH) operate Chipatala cha pa Foni (CCPF) or Health Center by Phone. CCPF has two main components:
1. A toll-free hotline staffed with health workers providing health information and advice.
2. A "tips and reminders" mobile messaging service providing weekly messages tailored to the client's week of pregnancy or a child's age.

CCPF has a statistically significant impact on MNCH knowledge and behavior. CCPF users show improvements in use of antenatal care within the first trimester, bed nets during pregnancy, early initiation of breastfeeding, and knowledge of healthy behaviors during pregnancy, such as avoiding harmful medicines. CCPF users trust the service and cite the ability to access health information from home, saving time, and saving travel costs, as key benefits.

CCPF recently merged with Airtel Malawi's Dial-A-Doc program to form Airtel CCPF, a zero-rated service providing health information and advice beyond RMNCH with physician triage ability. CCPF is now available in eight of Malawi's 28 districts. Under direction of the MoH, CCPF is expected to scale nationally by the end of 2017.

Speakers
ZJ

Zachariah Jezman

mHealth Programme Manager, VillageReach
Zachariah Jezman is the mHealth Programme Manager for VillageReach Malawi. He heads a Health Centre by phone service and mNutrition, a content development project. He is a member of the Reproductive and Maternal Health and mHealth Technical Working Groups of Malawi. Previously, he... Read More →


Tuesday May 17, 2016 11:30 - 12:15
Giraffe 202

12:15

Health Center by Phone: An Innovation for Achieving SDGs
Limited Capacity seats available

In Malawi, a woman has a one in 34 chance of dying during childbirth and 3% of newborns die in their first month. Facing a lack of access to reliable health information, long travel distances to health facilities and other barriers, women and caregivers of children may delay or avoid seeking care. Knowing when and where to go are critical to improving reproductive, maternal, neonatal and child health (RMNCH) outcomes.
To achieve Sustainable Development Goal 3, the health information gap must be addressed. Designed to improve information availability and appropriate care-seeking behavior, VillageReach, Airtel Malawi, and the Malawi Ministry of Health (MoH) operate Chipatala cha pa Foni (CCPF) or Health Center by Phone. CCPF has two main components:
1. A toll-free hotline staffed with health workers providing health information and advice.
2. A "tips and reminders" mobile messaging service providing weekly messages tailored to the client's week of pregnancy or a child's age.

CCPF has a statistically significant impact on MNCH knowledge and behavior. CCPF users show improvements in use of antenatal care within the first trimester, bed nets during pregnancy, early initiation of breastfeeding, and knowledge of healthy behaviors during pregnancy, such as avoiding harmful medicines. CCPF users trust the service and cite the ability to access health information from home, saving time, and saving travel costs, as key benefits.

CCPF recently merged with Airtel Malawi's Dial-A-Doc program to form Airtel CCPF, a zero-rated service providing health information and advice beyond RMNCH with physician triage ability. CCPF is now available in eight of Malawi's 28 districts. Under direction of the MoH, CCPF is expected to scale nationally by the end of 2017.

Speakers
ZJ

Zachariah Jezman

mHealth Programme Manager, VillageReach
Zachariah Jezman is the mHealth Programme Manager for VillageReach Malawi. He heads a Health Centre by phone service and mNutrition, a content development project. He is a member of the Reproductive and Maternal Health and mHealth Technical Working Groups of Malawi. Previously, he... Read More →


Tuesday May 17, 2016 12:15 - 13:00
Giraffe 202

12:15

Hybrid Communities for Social and Behavior Change Communication
Limited Capacity seats available

This presentation focuses on the importance, benefits, and challenges of the usage of hybrid communities (face-to-face and virtual) for promoting health, particularly Social and Behavior Change Communication (SBCC). One hybrid community, Springboard for Health Communication, will be highlighted during the presentation; we will explore the facets of this sizeable community of health communication practitioners who have come together to talk about best practices and lessons learned in SBCC.


Here's the link to the Springboard>>

Local Nairobi contact: Rohin Onyango


Speakers
avatar for Rohin Onyango

Rohin Onyango

Technical Officer, Research, Monitoring and Evaluation, African Capacity Alliance
Rohin Onyango, B. Economics and Statistics, University of Nairobi, M.A Economics (Policy and Management) - Ongoing, Kenyatta University, is the Technical Officer, Research, Monitoring and Evaluation at Africa Capacity Alliance (ACA), the former Regional AIDS Training Network (RATN... Read More →
avatar for Fredrik Winsnes

Fredrik Winsnes

Director, Global Programs, NetHope
Fredrik Winsnes joined NetHope in 2011 and is currently responsible for the NetHope Solutions Center and the NetHope Leadership Institute . Through education and collaboration, the NetHope Solutions Center aims at assisting NetHope members and likeminded organizations to maximize... Read More →



Tuesday May 17, 2016 12:15 - 13:00
Giraffe 203

12:15

Test All Exposed Infants: The Use of Mobile Technology (IQSMS) to Improve Distribution and Availability of Dry Blood Spot Kits for Testing Exposed Infants in Tanga and Mara Regions, Tanzania
Limited Capacity seats available

The Local Partners Excel in Comprehensive HIV & AIDS Service Delivery (LEAD) project, funded by the Centers for Disease Control under PEPFAR, supports prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) services at 509 facilities in Mara and Tanga regions of Tanzania. Most are health centers and dispensaries in remote locations with unreliable or no sources of funds to transport reports and travel to collect medical supplies. These factors contribute to regular stock-outs of Dry Blood Spot (DBS) kits needed for HIV testing of children (exposed infants) born by HIV positive women. In July 2013, LEAD introduced the use of International Quality Short Message Software (IQSMS) to support facilities to share DBS kits information without traveling.
Methods: The IQSMS software package uses health providers’ mobile phones to send preformatted exposed infants enrolled and tested and DBS stock reports to a central in-country server via SMS. Messages are received by a modem connected to a server which performs data quality checks and responds to the sender. After data verification, the data are integrated into the database. The enrolled and tested exposed infants and DBS stock reports are then retrieved, analyzed, and shared with key stakeholders for immediate action.
Results: Using a snapshot of reports sent by 467 sites from October to December 2014, analysis indicated 73% of 800 newly enrolled exposed infants were tested. A total of 40 facilities had no DBS test kits while a total of 1,791 DBS kits were available in all other 467 sites, which could enable testing of all exposed infants enrolled. This information helped program, district, and facility staff to support re-distribution of DBS test kits to sites that had none. The October-December 2015 report indicated 94% of 666 newly enrolled exposed infants in all 467 sites were tested, there were no stock-outs of DBS kits reported from any of the site.
Conclusion: IQSMS provides district, regional, and national stakeholders with up-to-date, vital information and assists with decision making about the distribution and re-distribution of DBS test kits to avoid disruption in the testing of exposed infants.

Speakers
avatar for John Ndega

John Ndega

Deputy Strategic Information Advisor, The Palladium Group
John Ndega, MSc Health Informatics, BSc Comp Eng & IT; is currently the Deputy SI Advisor for the Palladium Group, formerly known as Futures Group. He has been a full-time employee of Futures Group since 2007, holding Technical and Management positions on AIDSRelief/LEAD projects... Read More →



Tuesday May 17, 2016 12:15 - 13:00
Giraffe 204

14:00

CreativeMapper and SDG Youth Action Mapper: How Creative Is Integrating Mapping and GIS Tech into Development Work
Limited Capacity filling up

In the development sector it has been standard for enumerators from outside a community to enter that community, extract data and not return any of the information from the data collection. The rapid adoption of mobile devices in developing countries now allows for data collection and analysis to not only be more rapid and more frequent, but to also be more participatory and inclusive. To empower community-based data collection and mapping, Creative has developed the CreativeMapper toolkit. Citizens, particularly youth, have been trained on how to use the toolkit to gather information important their community's development and to make that data easily accessible on a public map.

To support the massive data collection needs of the SDGs, Creative has used its CreativeMapper toolkit to develop the SDG Youth Action Mapper (SDG YAM) model. For SDG YAM, Creative and its partners will be mobilizing and training youth to map opportunities for taking action on the SDGs using their mobile devices. Youth will identify volunteer opportunities that contribute to the realization of the 17 goals. The map of SDG action opportunities will allow other youth to find ways to contribute to the development of their country. The Points of Contact for the opportunities that have been mapped will use CreativeMapper to report regularly on the number of hours youth have volunteered toward the SDG goals and the results of this volunteer time. SDG YAM is changing how development is done by putting youth in charge of identifying opportunities and taking action toward the development of their countries and having their efforts logged and counted toward the realization of development goals.

Speakers
avatar for Ayan Kishore

Ayan Kishore

Director, Creative Development Lab, Creative Associates International
Ayan Kishore is a social entrepreneur who has successfully built, grown and sold technology companies. At Creative Associates International, he leads the Creative Development Lab in the application of technology in development programs in education, violence prevention, workforce... Read More →


Tuesday May 17, 2016 14:00 - 14:45
Giraffe 203

14:00

Digital Implementation of Seasonal Malaria ChemoPrevention (SMC) in the Sahel
Limited Capacity seats available

CRS is implementing the ACCESS-SMC Project in Mali, Niger, Guinea and the Gambia where we are utilizing eValuate and NetSuite as the digital backbone for data management with a mix of digital and paper collection and mixed methods of H2H and fixed site collection processes. We will demonstrate the opportunities and challenges, but overall the importance of digital process for ensuring data quality and rapid access to data for decision making when implementing in complex environments.

Speakers
avatar for Eric Hubbard

Eric Hubbard

Regional Coordinator: Monitoring, Evaluation, Accountability and Learning (ACCESS-SMC Project), Catholic Relief Services
Eric Hubbard serves the Regional MEAL Coordinator of the UNITAID-funded ACCESS-SMC (seasonal malaria) Project at CRS - implemented in Mali, Guinea, Niger and The Gambia. Over the past 15 years Eric has supported the design and management of system-wide capacity strengthening and integrated... Read More →


Tuesday May 17, 2016 14:00 - 14:45
Giraffe 202

14:00

Use of Mobile Technology to Monitor the Quality and Effectiveness of Community Mobilization Activities in Sindh Province, Pakistan
Limited Capacity filling up

The lack of tools to monitor the quality and effectiveness of community mobilization activities has resulted in limited understanding of the effectiveness of community mobilization and contributed to low investment in and commitment to this strategy globally. A mobile monitoring system was established to assess the quality of implementation of CHW-led MNCH mobilization activities in Sindh province, Pakistan.

Methods
About 12,679 community support groups (CSGs) were implemented during the first 9 months of implementation of this activity in five districts of Sindh. We present an analysis of routine monitoring data submitted via mobile devices by supervisors who observed and assessed 875 CSGs. The analysis asks the following questions: What was the quality of CSGs? Did the quality improve over time? Who attended CSGs? Did participants of CSGs reported intentions to implement behaviors recommended in CSGs? What factors were associated with participants' intentions to change behaviors?

Results
Bivariate and multivariate analysis was conducted with data from observations of SGs held in rural Sindh. The analysis shows that the quality of support groups improved after the first couple of months of training, remained stable for four months and declined subsequently due to operational reasons. Messages on maternal and child health provided through support groups had the greatest impact on the poorest women and community.

Conclusions
Mobile technology allowed program managers to confidently assess, track and provide feedback on the quality of women's support groups. Commitment to mobilization activities has increased in Sindh: more than 100,000 CSGs are planned by the Department of Health across 15 districts during 2016.

Speakers
avatar for Anayat Ali

Anayat Ali

Manager, MIS, Maternal and Child Health Integrated Program/Jhpiego
Anayat Ali is working as a MIS Manager in MCHIP/Jhpiego Karachi Pakistan. He holds a master of Business Administration in Information Technology, providing inclusive solutions using state-of-the-art technologies like mPowering and Web. His responsibilities are planning, designing... Read More →


Tuesday May 17, 2016 14:00 - 14:45
Giraffe 204

14:45

Digital Implementation of Seasonal Malaria ChemoPrevention (SMC) in the Sahel
Limited Capacity seats available

CRS is implementing the ACCESS-SMC Project in Mali, Niger, Guinea and the Gambia where we are utilizing eValuate and NetSuite as the digital backbone for data management with a mix of digital and paper collection and mixed methods of H2H and fixed site collection processes. We will demonstrate the opportunities and challenges, but overall the importance of digital process for ensuring data quality and rapid access to data for decision making when implementing in complex environments.

Speakers
avatar for Eric Hubbard

Eric Hubbard

Regional Coordinator: Monitoring, Evaluation, Accountability and Learning (ACCESS-SMC Project), Catholic Relief Services
Eric Hubbard serves the Regional MEAL Coordinator of the UNITAID-funded ACCESS-SMC (seasonal malaria) Project at CRS - implemented in Mali, Guinea, Niger and The Gambia. Over the past 15 years Eric has supported the design and management of system-wide capacity strengthening and integrated... Read More →


Tuesday May 17, 2016 14:45 - 15:30
Giraffe 202

14:45

Use of Mobile Technology to Monitor the Quality and Effectiveness of Community Mobilization Activities in Sindh Province, Pakistan
Limited Capacity seats available

The lack of tools to monitor the quality and effectiveness of community mobilization activities has resulted in limited understanding of the effectiveness of community mobilization and contributed to low investment in and commitment to this strategy globally. A mobile monitoring system was established to assess the quality of implementation of CHW-led MNCH mobilization activities in Sindh province, Pakistan.

Methods
About 12,679 community support groups (CSGs) were implemented during the first 9 months of implementation of this activity in five districts of Sindh. We present an analysis of routine monitoring data submitted via mobile devices by supervisors who observed and assessed 875 CSGs. The analysis asks the following questions: What was the quality of CSGs? Did the quality improve over time? Who attended CSGs? Did participants of CSGs reported intentions to implement behaviors recommended in CSGs? What factors were associated with participants' intentions to change behaviors?

Results
Bivariate and multivariate analysis was conducted with data from observations of SGs held in rural Sindh. The analysis shows that the quality of support groups improved after the first couple of months of training, remained stable for four months and declined subsequently due to operational reasons. Messages on maternal and child health provided through support groups had the greatest impact on the poorest women and community.

Conclusions
Mobile technology allowed program managers to confidently assess, track and provide feedback on the quality of women's support groups. Commitment to mobilization activities has increased in Sindh: more than 100,000 CSGs are planned by the Department of Health across 15 districts during 2016.

Speakers
avatar for Anayat Ali

Anayat Ali

Manager, MIS, Maternal and Child Health Integrated Program/Jhpiego
Anayat Ali is working as a MIS Manager in MCHIP/Jhpiego Karachi Pakistan. He holds a master of Business Administration in Information Technology, providing inclusive solutions using state-of-the-art technologies like mPowering and Web. His responsibilities are planning, designing... Read More →


Tuesday May 17, 2016 14:45 - 15:30
Giraffe 204

16:00

Improving Program Quality with a Nationally Developed MIS
Limited Capacity filling up

The data management burden of large OVC programs is enormous. Services for OVC are need based, in the face of limited resources, services are provided first to children most in need. In large programs, paper based tools alone pose a challenge for service prioritization and client level monitoring.
The NOMIS is a web application design, using Java technology, it is easy setup and very user-friendly. It has in-built data validation rules to minimize data entry errors and enhance data quality. It generates custom reports, service statistics, client lists and a dashboard of selected indicators. It exports data to MS excel and other related tools for further analysis. CRS Nigeria's SMILE Project adapted and enhanced NOMIS in order to respond to her data collation, analysis and reporting needs.
SMILE has utilized NOMIS as an ICT4D solution to enhance data use and evidence based programming on a large scale OVC program that integrates data from approximately 50-plus partners. NOMIS facilitates data entry and analysis that is able to present key OVC programming indicators of vulnerability categories, enrollment and service delivery, all with disaggregation capabilities of age and sex. It captures client level data, and then aggregates at CSO, LGA, State and national levels. In addition, NOMIS supports case management and guide monitoring of CSO activities.
Experience with the NOMIS has demonstrated that it is possible to utilize electronic records to capture store and manage program data in OVC programs in a resource limited setting.
The adoption of the National OVC Management Information System (NOMIS) as the National OVC database by the FMWASD represents a giant step towards revolutionizing OVC programming in Nigeria and creating a solid MIS.

Speakers
avatar for Jimin Sontyo

Jimin Sontyo

Monitoring and Evaluation Manager, Catholic Relief Services
Jimin Sontyo currently serves as M&E Manager with Catholic Relief Services in Nigeria and works on the Sustainable Mechanisms for Improving Livelihoods and Household Empowerment (SMILE) project. Jimin is directly responsible for providing technical guidance for monitoring and evaluation... Read More →



Tuesday May 17, 2016 16:00 - 16:45
Giraffe 202

16:00

mHealth for Ebola Vaccine Trial in Sierra Leone
Limited Capacity seats available

A Phase 2B expanded safety and immunogenicity trial is being carried out in the Kambia District of Sierra Leone by the EBOVAC1 consortium, in partnership with the College of Medicine and Allied Health Sciences (Sierra Leone), under the name EBOVAC-Salone. This large scale safety and immunogenicity study seeks to learn as much as possible about how the vaccines work in people who live in an area affected by Ebola. The first participants in the EBOVAC-Salone study were vaccinated in early October 2015.

The adjunct EBODAC project has developed a communication strategy and tools to promote the acceptance and uptake of the Ebola vaccine. One of the project's most important products has been a mobile technology platform, dedicated to facilitating Ebola vaccine deployment, acceptance and compliance. In addition to providing local communities with information on Ebola and vaccines, the platform sends reminders to people receiving the prime-boost vaccine to return for their second 'booster' dose and to facilitate the tracking of vaccination coverage. The EBODAC team also provided local training programs to make sure the communication strategy and technology tools were ready for deployment in the local setting.

EBOVAC and EBODAC are funded by the European Union Innovative Medicines Initiative (IMI).

Speakers
avatar for Monica Amponsah

Monica Amponsah

Regional Program Manager, Grameen Foundation
Monica is Regional Program Manager at Grameen Foundation supporting the EBODAC (Ebola Vaccine Deployment, Acceptance & Compliance) project, responsible for the development of a mobile platform to improve communication and compliance of participants in the Ebola vaccine trial and beyond... Read More →
RK

Robert Kanwagi

Programme Coordinator, World Vision Ireland
Robert Kanwagi is a Social Worker and Public Health Professional with 15 years of experience in developing and managing public health programs in Uganda, South Sudan, Sierra Leone and Ireland. Presently working for World Vision Ireland as a Programme Coordinator of the EBODAC project... Read More →



Tuesday May 17, 2016 16:00 - 16:45
Giraffe 204

16:00

Real-Time Analytics to Improve Health Worker Performance
Limited Capacity filling up

Increasingly, mHealth tools are being developed for Community Health Workers (CHWs) to address barriers they face in the field, including and not limited to balancing multiple priorities, lack of information tools support services and record data, and limited access to training and supervision. However, the majority of initiatives have been pilot projects with little evidence on effectiveness or impact of mobile technology.  OpenSRP is an open-source integrated electronic register-based mobile data platform that supports CHWs to deliver core interventions along the RMNCH continuum of care. OpenSRP Indonesia is employing an iterative development approach that combines field assessments (knowledge, use and motivation), usability testing (compliance, learning ability, usefulness) and integrated analytics (operability, proficiency) to optimize the digitalization of paper-based registers and rapidly identify and solve challenges in the field. Data from each of the assessments is collaboratively used to iterate and improve both the application itself and the implementation design, while ensuring the central involvement of the CHWs throughout the process. This 3-months development phase involving 12 CHWs precedes a 6-month randomized controlled trial of OpenSRP with 40 CHWs that will cover ~5800 pregnant women and their children. Results suggest the use of real time rapid analysis of these routine assessments of provider performance and OpenSRP usability enables a dynamic process of continuous quality improvement.  It has also been shown to increase CHWs performance and responsiveness to the uptake of OpenSRP and identified key implementation challenges early on. Developing both rapid analysis processes and evaluation techniques that utilize the real time data made available by mHealth is crucial for continuous quality improvement and sustainability of mHealth approaches. 

Speakers
DA

Dr. Anuraj Shankar

Senior Research Scientist, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
Dr. Anuraj Shankar (DSc) is a Senior Research Scientist at the Harvard University T.H. Chan School of Public Health and key advisor to digital health implementations globally. Dr. Shankar's current areas of interest relate to building local capacity for use of data in decision-making... Read More →


Tuesday May 17, 2016 16:00 - 16:45
Giraffe 203

16:45

Improving Program Quality with a Nationally Developed MIS
Limited Capacity seats available

The data management burden of large OVC programs is enormous. Services for OVC are need based, in the face of limited resources, services are provided first to children most in need. In large programs, paper based tools alone pose a challenge for service prioritization and client level monitoring.
The NOMIS is a web application design, using Java technology, it is easy setup and very user-friendly. It has in-built data validation rules to minimize data entry errors and enhance data quality. It generates custom reports, service statistics, client lists and a dashboard of selected indicators. It exports data to MS excel and other related tools for further analysis. CRS Nigeria's SMILE Project adapted and enhanced NOMIS in order to respond to her data collation, analysis and reporting needs.
SMILE has utilized NOMIS as an ICT4D solution to enhance data use and evidence based programming on a large scale OVC program that integrates data from approximately 50-plus partners. NOMIS facilitates data entry and analysis that is able to present key OVC programming indicators of vulnerability categories, enrollment and service delivery, all with disaggregation capabilities of age and sex. It captures client level data, and then aggregates at CSO, LGA, State and national levels. In addition, NOMIS supports case management and guide monitoring of CSO activities.
Experience with the NOMIS has demonstrated that it is possible to utilize electronic records to capture store and manage program data in OVC programs in a resource limited setting.
The adoption of the National OVC Management Information System (NOMIS) as the National OVC database by the FMWASD represents a giant step towards revolutionizing OVC programming in Nigeria and creating a solid MIS.

Speakers
avatar for Jimin Sontyo

Jimin Sontyo

Monitoring and Evaluation Manager, Catholic Relief Services
Jimin Sontyo currently serves as M&E Manager with Catholic Relief Services in Nigeria and works on the Sustainable Mechanisms for Improving Livelihoods and Household Empowerment (SMILE) project. Jimin is directly responsible for providing technical guidance for monitoring and evaluation... Read More →


Tuesday May 17, 2016 16:45 - 17:30
Giraffe 202

16:45

mHealth for Ebola Vaccine Trial in Sierra Leone
Limited Capacity seats available

A Phase 2B expanded safety and immunogenicity trial is being carried out in the Kambia District of Sierra Leone by the EBOVAC1 consortium, in partnership with the College of Medicine and Allied Health Sciences (Sierra Leone), under the name EBOVAC-Salone. This large scale safety and immunogenicity study seeks to learn as much as possible about how the vaccines work in people who live in an area affected by Ebola. The first participants in the EBOVAC-Salone study were vaccinated in early October 2015.

The adjunct EBODAC project has developed a communication strategy and tools to promote the acceptance and uptake of the Ebola vaccine. One of the project's most important products has been a mobile technology platform, dedicated to facilitating Ebola vaccine deployment, acceptance and compliance. In addition to providing local communities with information on Ebola and vaccines, the platform sends reminders to people receiving the prime-boost vaccine to return for their second 'booster' dose and to facilitate the tracking of vaccination coverage. The EBODAC team also provided local training programs to make sure the communication strategy and technology tools were ready for deployment in the local setting.

EBOVAC and EBODAC are funded by the European Union Innovative Medicines Initiative (IMI).

Speakers
avatar for Monica Amponsah

Monica Amponsah

Regional Program Manager, Grameen Foundation
Monica is Regional Program Manager at Grameen Foundation supporting the EBODAC (Ebola Vaccine Deployment, Acceptance & Compliance) project, responsible for the development of a mobile platform to improve communication and compliance of participants in the Ebola vaccine trial and beyond... Read More →
RK

Robert Kanwagi

Programme Coordinator, World Vision Ireland
Robert Kanwagi is a Social Worker and Public Health Professional with 15 years of experience in developing and managing public health programs in Uganda, South Sudan, Sierra Leone and Ireland. Presently working for World Vision Ireland as a Programme Coordinator of the EBODAC project... Read More →



Tuesday May 17, 2016 16:45 - 17:30
Giraffe 204

16:45

Real-Time Analytics to Improve Health Worker Performance
Limited Capacity filling up

Increasingly, mHealth tools are being developed for Community Health Workers (CHWs) to address barriers they face in the field, including and not limited to balancing multiple priorities, lack of information tools support services and record data, and limited access to training and supervision. However, the majority of initiatives have been pilot projects with little evidence on effectiveness or impact of mobile technology.  OpenSRP is an open-source integrated electronic register-based mobile data platform that supports CHWs to deliver core interventions along the RMNCH continuum of care. OpenSRP Indonesia is employing an iterative development approach that combines field assessments (knowledge, use and motivation), usability testing (compliance, learning ability, usefulness) and integrated analytics (operability, proficiency) to optimize the digitalization of paper-based registers and rapidly identify and solve challenges in the field. Data from each of the assessments is collaboratively used to iterate and improve both the application itself and the implementation design, while ensuring the central involvement of the CHWs throughout the process. This 3-months development phase involving 12 CHWs precedes a 6-month randomized controlled trial of OpenSRP with 40 CHWs that will cover ~5800 pregnant women and their children. Results suggest the use of real time rapid analysis of these routine assessments of provider performance and OpenSRP usability enables a dynamic process of continuous quality improvement.  It has also been shown to increase CHWs performance and responsiveness to the uptake of OpenSRP and identified key implementation challenges early on. Developing both rapid analysis processes and evaluation techniques that utilize the real time data made available by mHealth is crucial for continuous quality improvement and sustainability of mHealth approaches. 

Speakers
DA

Dr. Anuraj Shankar

Senior Research Scientist, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
Dr. Anuraj Shankar (DSc) is a Senior Research Scientist at the Harvard University T.H. Chan School of Public Health and key advisor to digital health implementations globally. Dr. Shankar's current areas of interest relate to building local capacity for use of data in decision-making... Read More →


Tuesday May 17, 2016 16:45 - 17:30
Giraffe 203
 
Wednesday, May 18
 

10:45

Pragmatic Monitoring and Evaluation of ICT for Health: a WHO Toolkit
Limited Capacity seats available

"How do I evaluate my digital health program?" "What indicators should I use to demonstrate my ICT strategy works?" "What claims can I make about my ICT strategy on health outcomes?" Despite the global call for implementations to be guided by evidence, program managers face these recurring questions when designing robust monitoring and evaluation (M&E) plans. Challenges associated with the M&E of digital health projects include the varied application of ICT for health, with permutations combining different technologies and platforms, health domains, and types of end-users. In addition, ICT often sits within the context of a larger health intervention, and may not operate as standalone packages amenable to discrete evaluations. Due to these considerations, M&E requires careful reflection and technical guidance. In response to this need, this session will showcase and discuss the recently launched WHO toolkit on M&E for digital health. The panel will feature representatives from WHO and Johns Hopkins University Global mHealth Initiative who will detail the pragmatic ICT-specific steps: target stakeholder evidence needs, use measurable indicators, review the quality of data, and systematically report findings. Additionally, this panel session will highlight key M&E resources of value to the ecosystem, including the mHealth Data Assessment Tool (mDAT) and the mHealth Evaluation, Reporting and Assessment of mHealth (mERA) Guidelines.

Moderators
TT

Tigest Tamrat

Consultant, World Health Organization
Tigest Tamrat is Consultant at the World Health Organization's Department of Reproductive Health and Research. Her primary work is focused on the science of digital health implementation, scale, and institutionalization, as well as supporting the development of WHO guidelines for... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Dr. Smisha Agarwal

Dr. Smisha Agarwal

Associate, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
Dr. Agarwal is an Associate in the Department of International Health at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and the Johns Hopkins Global mHealth Initiative (JHU-GmI). She is a population health scientist with expertise in monitoring and evaluation of large scale maternal... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Alain Labrique

Dr. Alain Labrique

Director / Associate Professor, JHU Global mHealth Initiative
Dr. Alain Labrique is the founding director of the Johns Hopkins University Global mHealth Initiative, a multi-disciplinary consortium engaged in digital health innovation and research across the Johns Hopkins system. Labrique serves as an mHealth and Technical Advisor to several... Read More →
DA

Dr. Amnesty LeFevre

Assistant Scientist, Johns Hopkins School of Public Health
Monitoring and Evaluation of digital health programs | Design and implementation of maternal newborn and child health programs in low and middle income countries | Economic evaluation
KZ

Kelsey Zeller

Research Associate, Johns Hopkins University School of Public Health
Kelsey Zeller is a Research Associate with Johns Hopkins University. She has spent almost four years designing, implementing and evaluating mHealth tools in rural Bangladesh. Kelsey previously worked on the design and evaluation of mTika, an mHealth application supporting vaccination... Read More →


Wednesday May 18, 2016 10:45 - 11:50
Mt Elgon D - Partition D

10:45

WHO Processes and Tools for Government Coordination of Digital Health Investments
Limited Capacity seats available

Presenters: Dr Garrett Mehl, WHO; Liz Peloso, PATH  
As the field of ICT for Development grows, governments in low and middle countries face an increasingly confusing diversity of digital health tools and systems, and a lack of guidance on how to review, compare, and assess value within specific ICT solutions for programmatic and data goals. Furthermore, an evidence-based 'systems approach' to integrating these digital strategies into existing health systems, which may already include some ehealth infrastructure, is lacking. As such, there is considerable demand among ministries of health, donors, and decision-makers for interagency tools to guide country-level inventory, review and prioritization of digital health strategies for addressing specific data and health systems needs across health domain areas. This panel will focus on the WHO's new inter-agency work within the Health Data Collaborative, and through the WHO Technical and Evidence Review Group toward building on WHO and PATH Optimize HIS toolkit, to developing a revised and expanded tool for country-level health programme review, and processes for prioritizing the use of ICT to address identified health priorities for achieving and monitoring Universal Health Coverage (UHC). Additionally, panelists will describe country-use of the emergent web-based platform for inventorying and reviewing digital tools and deployments. Highlighting guidance and tools being developed through extensive engagement with thought leaders and government decision-makers, this session will provide a unique opportunity to discuss efforts underway to inform government adoption of digital health information systems for the health SDGs, and mechanisms to guide country-level digital investments from multilateral global development partners in a coordinated way.

Speakers
avatar for Dr. Garrett Mehl

Dr. Garrett Mehl

Scientist, World Health Organization
Dr. Garrett Mehl leads work on digital innovations for reproductive, maternal and child health at WHO. This includes evidence synthesis as manager of the WHO Technical and Evidence Review Group on mHealth for Reproductive, Maternal, Newborn and Child Health (mTERG), and as WHO implementation... Read More →
avatar for Liz Peloso

Liz Peloso

Global Outreach Advisor, PATH


Wednesday May 18, 2016 10:45 - 11:50
Mt Elgon D - Partition C

11:50

Pragmatic Monitoring and Evaluation of ICT for Health: a WHO Toolkit
Limited Capacity seats available

"How do I evaluate my digital health program?" "What indicators should I use to demonstrate my ICT strategy works?" "What claims can I make about my ICT strategy on health outcomes?" Despite the global call for implementations to be guided by evidence, program managers face these recurring questions when designing robust monitoring and evaluation (M&E) plans. Challenges associated with the M&E of digital health projects include the varied application of ICT for health, with permutations combining different technologies and platforms, health domains, and types of end-users. In addition, ICT often sits within the context of a larger health intervention, and may not operate as standalone packages amenable to discrete evaluations. Due to these considerations, M&E requires careful reflection and technical guidance. In response to this need, this session will showcase and discuss the recently launched WHO toolkit on M&E for digital health. The panel will feature representatives from WHO and Johns Hopkins University Global mHealth Initiative who will detail the pragmatic ICT-specific steps: target stakeholder evidence needs, use measurable indicators, review the quality of data, and systematically report findings. Additionally, this panel session will highlight key M&E resources of value to the ecosystem, including the mHealth Data Assessment Tool (mDAT) and the mHealth Evaluation, Reporting and Assessment of mHealth (mERA) Guidelines.

Moderators
TT

Tigest Tamrat

Consultant, World Health Organization
Tigest Tamrat is Consultant at the World Health Organization's Department of Reproductive Health and Research. Her primary work is focused on the science of digital health implementation, scale, and institutionalization, as well as supporting the development of WHO guidelines for... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Dr. Smisha Agarwal

Dr. Smisha Agarwal

Associate, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
Dr. Agarwal is an Associate in the Department of International Health at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and the Johns Hopkins Global mHealth Initiative (JHU-GmI). She is a population health scientist with expertise in monitoring and evaluation of large scale maternal... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Alain Labrique

Dr. Alain Labrique

Director / Associate Professor, JHU Global mHealth Initiative
Dr. Alain Labrique is the founding director of the Johns Hopkins University Global mHealth Initiative, a multi-disciplinary consortium engaged in digital health innovation and research across the Johns Hopkins system. Labrique serves as an mHealth and Technical Advisor to several... Read More →
DA

Dr. Amnesty LeFevre

Assistant Scientist, Johns Hopkins School of Public Health
Monitoring and Evaluation of digital health programs | Design and implementation of maternal newborn and child health programs in low and middle income countries | Economic evaluation
KZ

Kelsey Zeller

Research Associate, Johns Hopkins University School of Public Health
Kelsey Zeller is a Research Associate with Johns Hopkins University. She has spent almost four years designing, implementing and evaluating mHealth tools in rural Bangladesh. Kelsey previously worked on the design and evaluation of mTika, an mHealth application supporting vaccination... Read More →


Wednesday May 18, 2016 11:50 - 12:50
Mt Elgon D - Partition D

11:50

Tex4Life - Improving Health through SMS Communication
Limited Capacity filling up

Malawi faces a number of problems in health due to behavioral barriers that include inadequate knowledge about recommended practices in addition to low perception of risk and efficacy of interventions. While cell phones are becoming a common means of communication with 85% ownership (MACRA, 2016), and cognizant of the fact that their massive proliferation is predictable, the SSDI-Communication project has been piloting a Text4Life initiative that utilizes SMS communication to leverage on other forms of communication in print and electronic media.

Through the Initiative, SSDI-Communication sends and receives SMS's to and from listeners of a Moyo ndi Mpamba radio program. More than 8,000 health messages are sent weekly to listeners of a program that receives 300 SMS's per week. For men and women expecting a baby the messages are personalized to respond to their specific needs according to the stage of their pregnancy. Text4Life also follows up on activities undertaken by Community Action Groups and communicates them to others communities through the radio program; reaching an estimated 20% of the album and youth population in Malawi.

Periodical 'Question and Answer' activities through Text4Life indicate that the initiative is closing knowledge gaps and contributing to behavior change. Text4Life is an example of a replicable cost-effective means of health communication. It also is an alternative means for the youth to surmount cultural challenges barring open discussions on family planning.

Speakers
avatar for Chancy Mauluka

Chancy Mauluka

Social and Behaviour Change Communication (SBCC) Advisor, Johns Hopkins Center for Communication Programs
Chancy Mauluka has a Master of Arts Degree in Theatre and Media for Communication in Development and a Bachelor's Degree in Education Humanities. He has more than 10 years of experience in development and health communication coupled with educational skills and practice. Chancy has... Read More →



Wednesday May 18, 2016 11:50 - 12:50
Mt Elgon D - Partition C

13:50

Global Launch of WHO Digital MAPS Platform: Facilitating Technology Curation, Optimizing Scale-Up, Crowdsourcing Lessons
Limited Capacity seats available

Recently, the World Health Organization, the United Nations Foundation, and Johns Hopkins University's Global mHealth Initiative have contributed to developing the WHO mHealth Assessment and Planning for Scale (MAPS) Toolkit. The MAPS Toolkit offers a comprehensive self-assessment and planning guide designed to improve the capacity of program managers to objectively assess the maturity of their projects and measure progress towards ensuring sustainability. Since its initial release, the MAPS Toolkit has undergone a digital transformation into a web-based platform that facilitates an interactive approach for registering mHealth implementations, documenting scale-up experiences, viewing performance metrics, and crowdsourcing/sharing of lessons and resources. The session will serve as the global launch of the WHO-digitized MAPS platform, providing program managers the opportunity to learn about the web platform tools that aim to strengthen their implementation capacity for scale-up. This hands-on session will also allow program managers a forum to provide critical feedback on how the platform's functionality can be improved upon, in support of their need to monitor and optimize implementations. With increased use, the digital MAPS platform offers features supporting submission and systematic curation of user-populated content related to lessons from field experiences, practical tips, and resources of value to the ICT4D ecosystem.

Speakers
TT

Tigest Tamrat

Consultant, World Health Organization
Tigest Tamrat is Consultant at the World Health Organization's Department of Reproductive Health and Research. Her primary work is focused on the science of digital health implementation, scale, and institutionalization, as well as supporting the development of WHO guidelines for... Read More →


Wednesday May 18, 2016 13:50 - 14:55
Mt Elgon D - Partition D

13:50

mHealth Data Assessment Tool(mDAT)
Limited Capacity seats available

The importance of health information systems (HIS) and use of health data for decision making have long been recognized as critical to improving health service delivery and health systems performance. Mobile-based HIS programs face unique data quality challenges which often result in severe limitations in using the data to monitor and evaluate the program. In response to the need to better guide mobile data management practices, the WHO HRP and JHU-GmI developed the mHealth Data Assessment Tool (mDAT). The mDAT is adapted from existing HIS tools such as the Performance of Routine Information System Managament (PRISM) and presents a unique approach to designing, strengthening and evaluating a mobile-supported HIS.
The mDAT consists of six steps: identification of program claims, identification of indicators necessary to support those claims, overview of existing data sources, mapping of data sources, alignment of indicators with data sources, and assessment of the data. The final step (assessment of the data) takes the user through a series of questions under five domains which represent best practices for improving mobile data quality. These include the domains of data collection, data storage, data analytics/dashboards, data management and data use. Each of these supports the identification of gaps in the data management process, and aims to broadly generate recommendations for the improvement of the data management system.

Speakers
avatar for Dr. Smisha Agarwal

Dr. Smisha Agarwal

Associate, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
Dr. Agarwal is an Associate in the Department of International Health at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and the Johns Hopkins Global mHealth Initiative (JHU-GmI). She is a population health scientist with expertise in monitoring and evaluation of large scale maternal... Read More →


Wednesday May 18, 2016 13:50 - 14:55
Mt Elgon D - Partition C

14:55

Global Launch of WHO Digital MAPS Platform: Facilitating Technology Curation, Optimizing Scale-Up, Crowdsourcing Lessons
Limited Capacity seats available

Recently, the World Health Organization, the United Nations Foundation, and Johns Hopkins University's Global mHealth Initiative have contributed to developing the WHO mHealth Assessment and Planning for Scale (MAPS) Toolkit. The MAPS Toolkit offers a comprehensive self-assessment and planning guide designed to improve the capacity of program managers to objectively assess the maturity of their projects and measure progress towards ensuring sustainability. Since its initial release, the MAPS Toolkit has undergone a digital transformation into a web-based platform that facilitates an interactive approach for registering mHealth implementations, documenting scale-up experiences, viewing performance metrics, and crowdsourcing/sharing of lessons and resources. The session will serve as the global launch of the WHO-digitized MAPS platform, providing program managers the opportunity to learn about the web platform tools that aim to strengthen their implementation capacity for scale-up. This hands-on session will also allow program managers a forum to provide critical feedback on how the platform's functionality can be improved upon, in support of their need to monitor and optimize implementations. With increased use, the digital MAPS platform offers features supporting submission and systematic curation of user-populated content related to lessons from field experiences, practical tips, and resources of value to the ICT4D ecosystem.

Speakers
TT

Tigest Tamrat

Consultant, World Health Organization
Tigest Tamrat is Consultant at the World Health Organization's Department of Reproductive Health and Research. Her primary work is focused on the science of digital health implementation, scale, and institutionalization, as well as supporting the development of WHO guidelines for... Read More →


Wednesday May 18, 2016 14:55 - 16:00
Mt Elgon D - Partition D

14:55

mHealth Data Assessment Tool(mDAT)
Limited Capacity seats available

The importance of health information systems (HIS) and use of health data for decision making have long been recognized as critical to improving health service delivery and health systems performance. Mobile-based HIS programs face unique data quality challenges which often result in severe limitations in using the data to monitor and evaluate the program. In response to the need to better guide mobile data management practices, the WHO HRP and JHU-GmI developed the mHealth Data Assessment Tool (mDAT). The mDAT is adapted from existing HIS tools such as the Performance of Routine Information System Managament (PRISM) and presents a unique approach to designing, strengthening and evaluating a mobile-supported HIS.
The mDAT consists of six steps: identification of program claims, identification of indicators necessary to support those claims, overview of existing data sources, mapping of data sources, alignment of indicators with data sources, and assessment of the data. The final step (assessment of the data) takes the user through a series of questions under five domains which represent best practices for improving mobile data quality. These include the domains of data collection, data storage, data analytics/dashboards, data management and data use. Each of these supports the identification of gaps in the data management process, and aims to broadly generate recommendations for the improvement of the data management system.

Speakers
avatar for Dr. Smisha Agarwal

Dr. Smisha Agarwal

Associate, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
Dr. Agarwal is an Associate in the Department of International Health at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and the Johns Hopkins Global mHealth Initiative (JHU-GmI). She is a population health scientist with expertise in monitoring and evaluation of large scale maternal... Read More →


Wednesday May 18, 2016 14:55 - 16:00
Mt Elgon D - Partition C

16:30

Making Global the New Local! How Can Digital Health Information Systems Support Local Decision-Making?
Limited Capacity seats available

In the health sector, achieving Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), universal health care, improving accountability and improving health outcome are all dependent on improved decision-making and a harmonized national information system across health and related sectors, including, health financing, human resources, logistics, civil registration and vital statistics, private sector and private pharmacies. A National Health Information Systems Architecture is essential to identify data needs and interoperability between multiple systems to make efficient use of resources. Enterprise Architecture (EA) is one such approach. We will share our experiences of using the EA approach to help the health system in Tanzania to identify data needs based on the business of healthcare delivery, decision-making at multiple levels of health system and the role of ICT. Our work focuses on the three principles of human decision making: thinking automatically, thinking socially, and thinking with mental models (World Development Report 2015). We will share lessons learned including, human-centered design, use of technology as enabler and translating data into policy/decision relevant formats and most importantly country ownership and a change management strategy.

Speakers
avatar for Alpha Nsaghurwe

Alpha Nsaghurwe

Senior Health Information Systems Advisor, MCSP, John Snow Inc
Alpha is a human-centered design expert with over 15 years' experience in Information Systems project management and implementation. He has contributed to state-of-the-art development and deployment of ICT systems at national levels. Alpha has successfully facilitated the deployment... Read More →



Wednesday May 18, 2016 16:30 - 17:30
Mt Elgon D - Partition D

16:30

State of the Evidence of ICTs for Health Systems: A WHO-Led Interagency Group on mHealth Meeting to Develop Practical Guidelines
Limited Capacity seats available

Despite growing consensus that mHealth strategies have the potential to improve Reproductive, Maternal, Newborn and Child Health the rate of innovation has outpaced the generation of evidence quantifying improvements in healthcare. This panel draws on recent work of WHO mHealth Technical and Evidence Review Group to present findings from a meeting, and details of the process being used to synthesize evidence on the effectiveness of mHealth strategies for health program implementation, and system strengthening. This interactive panel-discussion will detail the WHO effort for synthesizing evidence on effective mHealth strategies to address the diversity of categories of health systems constraints that apply to most health domain areas, including reproductive, maternal, child and adolescent health. It will provide session participants with an overview of how researchers, governments, policy-makers and donors will soon have WHO guidance needed to be able to comparatively review and assess the risks and benefits of specific mHealth strategies, in order to systematically plan for integrated development and deployment of digital health information systems that are able to address the full range of national health needs within the SDG era.

Moderators
avatar for Dr. Garrett Mehl

Dr. Garrett Mehl

Scientist, World Health Organization
Dr. Garrett Mehl leads work on digital innovations for reproductive, maternal and child health at WHO. This includes evidence synthesis as manager of the WHO Technical and Evidence Review Group on mHealth for Reproductive, Maternal, Newborn and Child Health (mTERG), and as WHO implementation... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Dr. Smisha Agarwal

Dr. Smisha Agarwal

Associate, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
Dr. Agarwal is an Associate in the Department of International Health at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and the Johns Hopkins Global mHealth Initiative (JHU-GmI). She is a population health scientist with expertise in monitoring and evaluation of large scale maternal... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Alain Labrique

Dr. Alain Labrique

Director / Associate Professor, JHU Global mHealth Initiative
Dr. Alain Labrique is the founding director of the Johns Hopkins University Global mHealth Initiative, a multi-disciplinary consortium engaged in digital health innovation and research across the Johns Hopkins system. Labrique serves as an mHealth and Technical Advisor to several... Read More →


Wednesday May 18, 2016 16:30 - 17:30
Jambo Conference Centre E

16:30

Universal Birth Registration - Securing a Child's Digital Footprint
Limited Capacity seats available

Day of panel to confirm - The UN Sustainable Development Goals recognize the 'great potential Information and Communication Technology holds to advance human progress' (paragraph 15). It sets targets for ICT deployment in Goal 4(Education), Goal 5 (Gender Equality) Goal 9 (Infrastructure - internet access for all) and Goal 17, as a Means of Implementation for all of the SDGs. However, target 16.9 - universal birth registration may be the most important use for the deployment of ICTs. 35% of all children born every day are unregistered and as a result there most basic human right is in peril - Article 6 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, which ensures that everyone has the right to 'recognition as a person'. It can be argued that this is the most important 'gateway' human right, upon which all other rights depend.

Speakers
avatar for Gary Fowlie

Gary Fowlie

Head, ITU Liason Office to the United Nations, International Telecommunications Union (ITU)
Gary Fowlie is the Head of the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) Liaison Office to the United Nations. ITU is the specialized agency of the UN responsible for information and communication technology. Gary worked as an Account Director for the global technology practice... Read More →


Wednesday May 18, 2016 16:30 - 17:30
Mt Elgon D - Partition C
 
Thursday, May 19
 

10:45

Effects of a Mobile Phone Short Message Service on Antiretroviral Treatment Adherence in Kenya (WelTel Kenya1): A Randomized Trial
Limited Capacity seats available

Mobile phone communication may improve delivery of health services. However, data on the effects of mobile health technology on patient outcomes in resource-limited settings are limited. We aimed to assess whether mobile phone communication between health-care workers and patients starting antiretroviral therapy in Kenya improved drug adherence and suppression of plasma HIV-1 RNA load.
Methods: WelTel Kenya1 was a multisite randomized clinical trial of HIV-infected adults initiating antiretroviral therapy (ART) in three clinics in Kenya. Patients were randomized (1:1) to a mobile phone short message service (SMS) intervention or standard care. Patients in the intervention group received weekly SMS messages from a clinic nurse and were required to respond within 48h. Primary outcomes were self-reported ART adherence (> 95% of prescribed doses in the past 30 days at both 6 and 12 month follow-up visits) and plasma HIV-1 viral RNA load suppression

Speakers
avatar for Bonface Beti

Bonface Beti

Senior Advocacy and Policy Advisor, Weltel International mHealth Society
Bonface joined the Weltel team in June 2009 when it started as a CDC-PEPFAR HIV Trial research at the University of Manitoba working as a senior advocacy manager. Prior to this, Bonface had worked with the World Social Forum Secretariat as an international Media Coordinator and at... Read More →



Thursday May 19, 2016 10:45 - 11:30
Giraffe 257

10:45

Lessons Learned in the Implementation and Scale of the Health Enablement and Learning Platform (HELP) Mobile Solution
Limited Capacity seats available

Developing countries are facing a severe shortage and significant skills gap of frontline health workers; Community Health Workers (CHWs) are essential to fill the gap. Building their capacity through training & empowerment strengthens the health system from the ground up. A cross-sectorial partnership comprising Amref Health Africa, Mezzanine, Accenture, M-PESA Foundation, Safaricom and the Kenya Ministry of Health (MOH) built a mobile phone-based tool, the Health Enablement and Learning Platform (HELP), to train and empower CHWs flexibly using their mobile device. The tool has been used for 3 years to offer continuous support in community health service delivery through access to peer collaboration tools, refresher training and strengthened supervision to over 3000 CHWs. To date, over 8,000,000 SMSes and 80,000 audio files of MOH approved learning content have been delivered to the CHWs. 85% of those enrolled on training complete on time with a performance of 90% in the inbuilt quizzes. There is reduced attrition, greater commitment in community health work and healthier communities. The project is in Phase II and defining the growth plan into a social enterprise. Different capacities are required in the design and deployment of the solution; it must be designed with scale in mind; a good understanding of the end user, technology infrastructure and general mHealth environment to ensure that the solution responds to the local need with flexibility to support advancing technology and environments. A 'Bring Your Own Device' approach ensures sustainability and scale of the solution; Ownership of the solution by the stakeholder's enables the developers maintain a lean team internally with reliance on the stakeholders on the ground for scale.

Speakers
avatar for Jackline Kiarie

Jackline Kiarie

Project Delivery Lead, Amref Health Africa
Jackie is the project lead for HELP, an innovative mLearning product, that has trained over 3,000 Community Health Workers across Kenya with ambitious plans to grow across all of Africa. She has over 10 years’ experience in the NGO and international development sector working with... Read More →


Thursday May 19, 2016 10:45 - 11:30
Giraffe 256

10:45

Mobile-Enabled Health Finance in Nairobi, Kenya
Limited Capacity seats available

MicroEnsure and Grameen Foundation are leveraging the reach and cost-effectiveness of mobile technology to reimagine the health financing landscape in Kenya. Our solution eliminates the financial barriers that lead poor Kenyans to delay seeking care, self-diagnose, and forego needed services. It bundles features that empower clients to manage their health and financial risk.

Our product, Fearless Health, provides mobile credit on-demand for primary health care services at participating clinics, requiring no advanced planning or payment. As Fearless Health customers repay with mobile money over time, they gain access to hospitalization insurance, health information, and a mobile game with the chance to win cash prizes. Designed in 2015 through an iterative research, prototyping, and testing process in collaboration with target clients and health clinics serving the poor, the product is now in pilot with two outpatient clinics in Nairobi.

Using technology to connect a loan management backend, a mobile payments platform, and a messaging system, the solution will be straightforward to install with new providers and is poised to scale rapidly to additional high-quality, low-cost providers reaching Kenya's poor. Fearless Health is proving how an agile, mobile-based financing and information solution can improve appropriate care-seeking behavior and ultimately lead to better health outcomes for low-income Kenyans.

Speakers
avatar for Carrie Ngongo

Carrie Ngongo

Senior Project Lead, Grameen Foundation
Carrie Ngongo has worked in ten countries across Africa and Asia to design and implement projects that increase access to healthcare, improve health outcomes, and strengthen health systems. Carrie leads health financing at the Grameen Foundation, a global nonprofit that helps the... Read More →


Thursday May 19, 2016 10:45 - 11:30
Giraffe 254

10:45

Safer Deliveries: Integration of mHealth and mMoney
Limited Capacity seats available

More than half of women in Zanzibar give birth at home, with facility delivery rates in some areas as low as 32%. Since 2011, the Safer Deliveries program has worked to increase facility deliveries in Zanzibar through a comprehensive program leveraging community health workers (CHWs), community drivers and health facility staff linked through integrated mobile health and mobile money systems. CHWs are trained to use a mobile application to register pregnant women and support them to develop a birth plan for a facility delivery. Community drivers transport women to health facilities during labor and are paid via mobile money, and CHWs communicate with health workers at facilities so they are prepared when the woman arrives. At the end of the second phase of the project in December 2014, the program increased rates of facility deliveries to 78% compared to a baseline estimate of 48%.

Currently the Safer Deliveries program is entering phase III with a focus on sustainability and government ownership. The current program is leveraging successes of previous phases, while developing systems to support women and families to save money for transportation and integrating mobile money and mobile technology platforms to support more efficient program management and administration. This presentation will discuss the evolution of the Safer Deliveries program and illustrate how mobile money and mobile health systems can be integrated to empower communities to improve maternal health outcomes.

Speakers
avatar for Erica Layer

Erica Layer

Chief Program Officer, D-tree International
Erica Layer is the Chief Program Officer at D-tree International. She has over 10 years of experience designing, implementing and monitoring international health projects with a focus on digital health, maternal and child health and HIV/AIDS. At D-tree, Erica is responsible for standardization... Read More →


Thursday May 19, 2016 10:45 - 11:30
Giraffe 255

11:30

Effects of a Mobile Phone Short Message Service on Antiretroviral Treatment Adherence in Kenya (WelTel Kenya1): A Randomized Trial
Limited Capacity seats available

Mobile phone communication may improve delivery of health services. However, data on the effects of mobile health technology on patient outcomes in resource-limited settings are limited. We aimed to assess whether mobile phone communication between health-care workers and patients starting antiretroviral therapy in Kenya improved drug adherence and suppression of plasma HIV-1 RNA load.
Methods: WelTel Kenya1 was a multisite randomized clinical trial of HIV-infected adults initiating antiretroviral therapy (ART) in three clinics in Kenya. Patients were randomized (1:1) to a mobile phone short message service (SMS) intervention or standard care. Patients in the intervention group received weekly SMS messages from a clinic nurse and were required to respond within 48h. Primary outcomes were self-reported ART adherence (> 95% of prescribed doses in the past 30 days at both 6 and 12 month follow-up visits) and plasma HIV-1 viral RNA load suppression 

Speakers
avatar for Bonface Beti

Bonface Beti

Senior Advocacy and Policy Advisor, Weltel International mHealth Society
Bonface joined the Weltel team in June 2009 when it started as a CDC-PEPFAR HIV Trial research at the University of Manitoba working as a senior advocacy manager. Prior to this, Bonface had worked with the World Social Forum Secretariat as an international Media Coordinator and at... Read More →


Thursday May 19, 2016 11:30 - 12:15
Giraffe 257

11:30

Exploring Mobile Phone Surveys in Low and Middle Income Countries: Will they Work?
Limited Capacity seats available

Globally, the proliferation of mobile telephony and cellular networks has connected once remote, rural populations to levels nearing saturation. Initial concerns about illiteracy and poverty creating a "digital divide", the dropping price of phones and service contracts have spurred high rates of ownership, across socio-economic boundaries. Amidst this backdrop of a mobile 'revolution', mobile phone surveys, such as SMS, IVR, and CATI, are being deployed for a range of health-related topics.

The session will begin with a presentation on the landscape of mobile phone surveys being used in LMICs.  The presenters will then discuss key points of consideration in the development of a mobile phone survey. Technical, statistical and political dimensions of this approach, combined with prior experiences in this area will be discussed. Active audience participation will be gained by asking specific feedback on the approach.


Moderators
avatar for Dr. Alain Labrique

Dr. Alain Labrique

Director / Associate Professor, JHU Global mHealth Initiative
Dr. Alain Labrique is the founding director of the Johns Hopkins University Global mHealth Initiative, a multi-disciplinary consortium engaged in digital health innovation and research across the Johns Hopkins system. Labrique serves as an mHealth and Technical Advisor to several... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Dr. Dustin Gibson

Dr. Dustin Gibson

Assistant Scientist, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
Dr. Dustin Gibson is an assistant Scientist in the Department of International Health at JHSPH. He has extensive experience in the application and evaluation of mobile health technologies to strengthen health systems and generate demand for health services in lower income countri... Read More →
DG

Dr. George Pariyo

Senior Scientist, Johns Hopkins BSPH
George Pariyo is a medical doctor by training, specialized in International Health with a focus on health systems. He is currently Senior Scientist at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and has over two decades experience working at national and global levels, most recently... Read More →


Thursday May 19, 2016 11:30 - 12:15
Giraffe 256

11:30

Mobile-Enabled Health Finance in Nairobi, Kenya
Limited Capacity seats available

MicroEnsure and Grameen Foundation are leveraging the reach and cost-effectiveness of mobile technology to reimagine the health financing landscape in Kenya. Our solution eliminates the financial barriers that lead poor Kenyans to delay seeking care, self-diagnose, and forego needed services. It bundles features that empower clients to manage their health and financial risk.

Our product, Fearless Health, provides mobile credit on-demand for primary health care services at participating clinics, requiring no advanced planning or payment. As Fearless Health customers repay with mobile money over time, they gain access to hospitalization insurance, health information, and a mobile game with the chance to win cash prizes. Designed in 2015 through an iterative research, prototyping, and testing process in collaboration with target clients and health clinics serving the poor, the product is now in pilot with two outpatient clinics in Nairobi.

Using technology to connect a loan management backend, a mobile payments platform, and a messaging system, the solution will be straightforward to install with new providers and is poised to scale rapidly to additional high-quality, low-cost providers reaching Kenya's poor. Fearless Health is proving how an agile, mobile-based financing and information solution can improve appropriate care-seeking behavior and ultimately lead to better health outcomes for low-income Kenyans.

Speakers
avatar for Carrie Ngongo

Carrie Ngongo

Senior Project Lead, Grameen Foundation
Carrie Ngongo has worked in ten countries across Africa and Asia to design and implement projects that increase access to healthcare, improve health outcomes, and strengthen health systems. Carrie leads health financing at the Grameen Foundation, a global nonprofit that helps the... Read More →


Thursday May 19, 2016 11:30 - 12:15
Giraffe 254

11:30

Safer Deliveries: Integration of mHealth and mMoney
Limited Capacity seats available

More than half of women in Zanzibar give birth at home, with facility delivery rates in some areas as low as 32%. Since 2011, the Safer Deliveries program has worked to increase facility deliveries in Zanzibar through a comprehensive program leveraging community health workers (CHWs), community drivers and health facility staff linked through integrated mobile health and mobile money systems. CHWs are trained to use a mobile application to register pregnant women and support them to develop a birth plan for a facility delivery. Community drivers transport women to health facilities during labor and are paid via mobile money, and CHWs communicate with health workers at facilities so they are prepared when the woman arrives. At the end of the second phase of the project in December 2014, the program increased rates of facility deliveries to 78% compared to a baseline estimate of 48%.

Currently the Safer Deliveries program is entering phase III with a focus on sustainability and government ownership. The current program is leveraging successes of previous phases, while developing systems to support women and families to save money for transportation and integrating mobile money and mobile technology platforms to support more efficient program management and administration. This presentation will discuss the evolution of the Safer Deliveries program and illustrate how mobile money and mobile health systems can be integrated to empower communities to improve maternal health outcomes.

Speakers
avatar for Erica Layer

Erica Layer

Chief Program Officer, D-tree International
Erica Layer is the Chief Program Officer at D-tree International. She has over 10 years of experience designing, implementing and monitoring international health projects with a focus on digital health, maternal and child health and HIV/AIDS. At D-tree, Erica is responsible for standardization... Read More →



Thursday May 19, 2016 11:30 - 12:15
Giraffe 255

12:15

Effects of a Mobile Phone Short Message Service on Antiretroviral Treatment Adherence in Kenya (WelTel Kenya1): A Randomized Trial
Limited Capacity seats available

Mobile phone communication may improve delivery of health services. However, data on the effects of mobile health technology on patient outcomes in resource-limited settings are limited. We aimed to assess whether mobile phone communication between health-care workers and patients starting antiretroviral therapy in Kenya improved drug adherence and suppression of plasma HIV-1 RNA load.
Methods: WelTel Kenya1 was a multisite randomized clinical trial of HIV-infected adults initiating antiretroviral therapy (ART) in three clinics in Kenya. Patients were randomized (1:1) to a mobile phone short message service (SMS) intervention or standard care. Patients in the intervention group received weekly SMS messages from a clinic nurse and were required to respond within 48h. Primary outcomes were self-reported ART adherence (> 95% of prescribed doses in the past 30 days at both 6 and 12 month follow-up visits) and plasma HIV-1 viral RNA load suppression 

Speakers
avatar for Bonface Beti

Bonface Beti

Senior Advocacy and Policy Advisor, Weltel International mHealth Society
Bonface joined the Weltel team in June 2009 when it started as a CDC-PEPFAR HIV Trial research at the University of Manitoba working as a senior advocacy manager. Prior to this, Bonface had worked with the World Social Forum Secretariat as an international Media Coordinator and at... Read More →


Thursday May 19, 2016 12:15 - 13:00
Giraffe 257

12:15

Exploring Mobile Phone Surveys in Low and Middle Income Countries: Will they Work?
Limited Capacity seats available

Globally, the proliferation of mobile telephony and cellular networks has connected once remote, rural populations to levels nearing saturation. Initial concerns about illiteracy and poverty creating a "digital divide", the dropping price of phones and service contracts have spurred high rates of ownership, across socio-economic boundaries. Amidst this backdrop of a mobile 'revolution', mobile phone surveys, such as SMS, IVR, and CATI, are being deployed for a range of health-related topics.

The session will begin with a presentation on the landscape of mobile phone surveys being used in LMICs.  The presenters will then discuss key points of consideration in the development of a mobile phone survey. Technical, statistical and political dimensions of this approach, combined with prior experiences in this area will be discussed. Active audience participation will be gained by asking specific feedback on the approach.


Moderators
avatar for Dr. Alain Labrique

Dr. Alain Labrique

Director / Associate Professor, JHU Global mHealth Initiative
Dr. Alain Labrique is the founding director of the Johns Hopkins University Global mHealth Initiative, a multi-disciplinary consortium engaged in digital health innovation and research across the Johns Hopkins system. Labrique serves as an mHealth and Technical Advisor to several... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Dr. Dustin Gibson

Dr. Dustin Gibson

Assistant Scientist, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
Dr. Dustin Gibson is an assistant Scientist in the Department of International Health at JHSPH. He has extensive experience in the application and evaluation of mobile health technologies to strengthen health systems and generate demand for health services in lower income countri... Read More →
DG

Dr. George Pariyo

Senior Scientist, Johns Hopkins BSPH
George Pariyo is a medical doctor by training, specialized in International Health with a focus on health systems. He is currently Senior Scientist at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and has over two decades experience working at national and global levels, most recently... Read More →


Thursday May 19, 2016 12:15 - 13:00
Giraffe 256

12:15

Mobile-Enabled Health Finance in Nairobi, Kenya
Limited Capacity seats available

MicroEnsure and Grameen Foundation are leveraging the reach and cost-effectiveness of mobile technology to reimagine the health financing landscape in Kenya. Our solution eliminates the financial barriers that lead poor Kenyans to delay seeking care, self-diagnose, and forego needed services. It bundles features that empower clients to manage their health and financial risk.

Our product, Fearless Health, provides mobile credit on-demand for primary health care services at participating clinics, requiring no advanced planning or payment. As Fearless Health customers repay with mobile money over time, they gain access to hospitalization insurance, health information, and a mobile game with the chance to win cash prizes. Designed in 2015 through an iterative research, prototyping, and testing process in collaboration with target clients and health clinics serving the poor, the product is now in pilot with two outpatient clinics in Nairobi.

Using technology to connect a loan management backend, a mobile payments platform, and a messaging system, the solution will be straightforward to install with new providers and is poised to scale rapidly to additional high-quality, low-cost providers reaching Kenya's poor. Fearless Health is proving how an agile, mobile-based financing and information solution can improve appropriate care-seeking behavior and ultimately lead to better health outcomes for low-income Kenyans.

Speakers
avatar for Carrie Ngongo

Carrie Ngongo

Senior Project Lead, Grameen Foundation
Carrie Ngongo has worked in ten countries across Africa and Asia to design and implement projects that increase access to healthcare, improve health outcomes, and strengthen health systems. Carrie leads health financing at the Grameen Foundation, a global nonprofit that helps the... Read More →


Thursday May 19, 2016 12:15 - 13:00
Giraffe 254

12:15

Safer Deliveries: Integration of mHealth and mMoney
Limited Capacity seats available

More than half of women in Zanzibar give birth at home, with facility delivery rates in some areas as low as 32%. Since 2011, the Safer Deliveries program has worked to increase facility deliveries in Zanzibar through a comprehensive program leveraging community health workers (CHWs), community drivers and health facility staff linked through integrated mobile health and mobile money systems. CHWs are trained to use a mobile application to register pregnant women and support them to develop a birth plan for a facility delivery. Community drivers transport women to health facilities during labor and are paid via mobile money, and CHWs communicate with health workers at facilities so they are prepared when the woman arrives. At the end of the second phase of the project in December 2014, the program increased rates of facility deliveries to 78% compared to a baseline estimate of 48%.

Currently the Safer Deliveries program is entering phase III with a focus on sustainability and government ownership. The current program is leveraging successes of previous phases, while developing systems to support women and families to save money for transportation and integrating mobile money and mobile technology platforms to support more efficient program management and administration. This presentation will discuss the evolution of the Safer Deliveries program and illustrate how mobile money and mobile health systems can be integrated to empower communities to improve maternal health outcomes.

Speakers
avatar for Erica Layer

Erica Layer

Chief Program Officer, D-tree International
Erica Layer is the Chief Program Officer at D-tree International. She has over 10 years of experience designing, implementing and monitoring international health projects with a focus on digital health, maternal and child health and HIV/AIDS. At D-tree, Erica is responsible for standardization... Read More →



Thursday May 19, 2016 12:15 - 13:00
Giraffe 255

14:00

Critical Strategy to Scale-up Towards SDG 3 in Nigeria
Limited Capacity seats available

This session shares experiences from developing Nigeria’s eHealth strategy and how the collaborative process was guided by the WHO/ITU eHealth strategy toolkit. This session will be helpful for other country stakeholders/decision-makers interested in supporting the review or development of national and/or sub-national eHealth strategies. The presenter worked as part of the UN Foundation team that supported the Nigeria’s Ministries of Health and Communications Technology to articulate and develop the National eHealth Strategy, which was ratified in March 2016.

 The presentation illustrates how the vision was derived from the Nigeria’s health sector priorities and how they aligned to SDG3. The presentation highlights the strategic value of a National eHealth strategy in mainstreaming ICTs in the health sector. Assessments were conducted to determine the current state eHealth enabling environment. The structure of the integrated action plan and the measurement matrix will be discussed. Key challenges encountered through the process will be enumerated. 


Speakers
avatar for Emeka Chukwu

Emeka Chukwu

Senior Advisor, NAMEK
Emeka Chukwu has over 10 years technology for development experience, and expertise in health software project design, configuration, testing, documentation, deployment, training and management. He has participated in several digital health researches – point of care, mobile health... Read More →



Thursday May 19, 2016 14:00 - 14:45
Giraffe 255

14:00

From Idea to Implementation: Generating mHealth Projects
Limited Capacity seats available

Trying to identify field and user-level ideas for mhealth projects in a diverse, multi-country NGO is a significant challenge. Often, ideas are developed at a high level of large organizations and fail to capture potential high impact activities. IRC has developed a process to guide field teams through a methodology to generate and then evaluate mhealth ideas to move towards quicker implementation of high value concepts. The process was developed through the analysis of lessons learned from over 60 IRC mobile technology projects, and has been refined through a number of field visits The approach is most effective when presented to a cross-section of field staff from different levels of staff responsibilities - front line health workers, supervisory staff, and managerial positions.

The framework beings with an explanation of 4 key impact areas where IRC has seen significant benefit from incorporating mobile technology: increasing provider capacity, increasing beneficiary knowledge, strengthening health systems, and use of mobile data collection. Examples of projects are provided per category. Teams are encouraged to apply these benefits to their own program and identified ideas are grouped by category. The ideas are then evaluated against a set of considerations to assess the feasibility of the proposed project. Considerations include mobile network coverage, staffing resources, logistical availability, and user familiarity with technology. Concepts that satisfy all of the considerations are further refined for pilot testing and development. The framework is normally presented as set of slides, guided discussions, and exercises - with a key set of action plans developed.

Speakers
avatar for Paul Amendola

Paul Amendola

Technical Advisor for Health Information, International Rescue Committee
Paul Amendola, MPH, is the Technical Advisor for Health Information Systems at the International Rescue Committee and is based in New York. The primary focus of his work is increasing data quality and analysis through data training, reviewing and advising on information systems. He... Read More →


Thursday May 19, 2016 14:00 - 14:45
Giraffe 257

14:00

Monitoring the Digital 'Learning Curve' - Indicators and Mechanisms to Identify Progress of Health Workers in Digital Transition
Limited Capacity seats available

In rural Bangladesh, 50 government health workers and 600 community health research workers are preparing to use tablets and mobile phones as the platform to support their service provision and data collection responsibilities - in place of the paper registers and forms they have been using for decades. These workers are preparing for the startup of mCARE-II, a study that will transition the government workers to a tablet based application, called OpenSRP, for record maintenance and service reminders for census, pregnancy surveillance, antenatal care, postnatal care and newborn care activities. The community research workers will provide the denominator, collecting data on all women in the study area (over 120,000), pregnancies (over 12,000), and ANC, PNC, and neonatal care service provision. All of these workers have gone through extensive training but are they really ready to implement the mCARE-II intervention? This presentation will outline the process of monitoring, and responding to, the Digital "Learning Curve" of government and research workers participating in mCARE-II. Each worker must "graduate" from training before implementation begins, with targeted re-training of workers who do not pass. The first weeks and months of implementation are then carefully monitored to observe the learning curve and identify the point at which worker performance indicators stabilize, reflecting that workers have reached the apex of their Learning Curve.

Speakers
KZ

Kelsey Zeller

Research Associate, Johns Hopkins University School of Public Health
Kelsey Zeller is a Research Associate with Johns Hopkins University. She has spent almost four years designing, implementing and evaluating mHealth tools in rural Bangladesh. Kelsey previously worked on the design and evaluation of mTika, an mHealth application supporting vaccination... Read More →


Thursday May 19, 2016 14:00 - 14:45
Giraffe 254

14:00

Promoting Local Ownership of Large-scale Health Projects
Limited Capacity seats available

South Africa is faced with high HIV/TB co-infection. Health officials strive to manage resources and treat HIV and TB patients in a coordinated way, but the information systems supporting this various programs have been separate and incompatible. Multiple systems place a greater burden on the national and provincial departments of health (in terms of support and training), and negatively affect health outcomes on a national level.

The TB/HIV information systems (THIS) project was initiated by the National Department of Health (NDoH) in January 2015 to integrate the collection of HIV and TB data in South African health facilities. This integration will facilitate better management of co-infected patients, integrate patient data into a single record for HIV, DS-TB and DR-TB, reduce the systems burden on provinces, and harmonize M&E for TB and HIV. It will also encourage and facilitate data use at the facility, provincial, and national levels.

This presentation describes efforts to promote local ownership of an integrated national information system, and to manage change among a diverse set of stakeholders. It looks beyond the technology and considers fundamental non-technical issues such as data collection processes, creating and driving adherence to standard operating procedures, implementation documentation and guidelines, building capacity to implement and maintain systems, and fostering a culture of data use.

Speakers
avatar for Katherine de Tolly

Katherine de Tolly

Senior Project Manager, Vital Wave
Katherine de Tolly brings years of experience working at the intersection of health and technology, particularly mHealth. She has worked on projects focused on maternal and child health, HIV, PMTCT, and TB in her native South Africa, and throughout the continent. Most recently, she... Read More →



Thursday May 19, 2016 14:00 - 14:45
Giraffe 256

14:45

Critical Strategy to Scale-up Towards SDG 3 in Nigeria
Limited Capacity seats available

This session shares experiences from developing Nigeria’s eHealth strategy and how the collaborative process was guided by the WHO/ITU eHealth strategy toolkit. This session will be helpful for other country stakeholders/decision-makers interested in supporting the review or development of national and/or sub-national eHealth strategies. The presenter worked as part of the UN Foundation team that supported the Nigeria’s Ministries of Health and Communications Technology to articulate and develop the National eHealth Strategy, which was ratified in March 2016.

 The presentation illustrates how the vision was derived from the Nigeria’s health sector priorities and how they aligned to SDG3. The presentation highlights the strategic value of a National eHealth strategy in mainstreaming ICTs in the health sector. Assessments were conducted to determine the current state eHealth enabling environment. The structure of the integrated action plan and the measurement matrix will be discussed. Key challenges encountered through the process will be enumerated. 

 


Speakers
avatar for Emeka Chukwu

Emeka Chukwu

Senior Advisor, NAMEK
Emeka Chukwu has over 10 years technology for development experience, and expertise in health software project design, configuration, testing, documentation, deployment, training and management. He has participated in several digital health researches – point of care, mobile health... Read More →



Thursday May 19, 2016 14:45 - 15:30
Giraffe 255

14:45

From Idea to Implementation: Generating mHealth Projects
Limited Capacity seats available

Trying to identify field and user-level ideas for mhealth projects in a diverse, multi-country NGO is a significant challenge. Often, ideas are developed at a high level of large organizations and fail to capture potential high impact activities. IRC has developed a process to guide field teams through a methodology to generate and then evaluate mhealth ideas to move towards quicker implementation of high value concepts. The process was developed through the analysis of lessons learned from over 60 IRC mobile technology projects, and has been refined through a number of field visits The approach is most effective when presented to a cross-section of field staff from different levels of staff responsibilities - front line health workers, supervisory staff, and managerial positions.

The framework beings with an explanation of 4 key impact areas where IRC has seen significant benefit from incorporating mobile technology: increasing provider capacity, increasing beneficiary knowledge, strengthening health systems, and use of mobile data collection. Examples of projects are provided per category. Teams are encouraged to apply these benefits to their own program and identified ideas are grouped by category. The ideas are then evaluated against a set of considerations to assess the feasibility of the proposed project. Considerations include mobile network coverage, staffing resources, logistical availability, and user familiarity with technology. Concepts that satisfy all of the considerations are further refined for pilot testing and development. The framework is normally presented as set of slides, guided discussions, and exercises - with a key set of action plans developed.

Speakers
avatar for Paul Amendola

Paul Amendola

Technical Advisor for Health Information, International Rescue Committee
Paul Amendola, MPH, is the Technical Advisor for Health Information Systems at the International Rescue Committee and is based in New York. The primary focus of his work is increasing data quality and analysis through data training, reviewing and advising on information systems. He... Read More →


Thursday May 19, 2016 14:45 - 15:30
Giraffe 257

14:45

Monitoring the Digital 'Learning Curve' - Indicators and Mechanisms to Identify Progress of Health Workers in Digital Transition
Limited Capacity seats available

In rural Bangladesh, 50 government health workers and 600 community health research workers are preparing to use tablets and mobile phones as the platform to support their service provision and data collection responsibilities - in place of the paper registers and forms they have been using for decades. These workers are preparing for the startup of mCARE-II, a study that will transition the government workers to a tablet based application, called OpenSRP, for record maintenance and service reminders for census, pregnancy surveillance, antenatal care, postnatal care and newborn care activities. The community research workers will provide the denominator, collecting data on all women in the study area (over 120,000), pregnancies (over 12,000), and ANC, PNC, and neonatal care service provision. All of these workers have gone through extensive training but are they really ready to implement the mCARE-II intervention? This presentation will outline the process of monitoring, and responding to, the Digital "Learning Curve" of government and research workers participating in mCARE-II. Each worker must "graduate" from training before implementation begins, with targeted re-training of workers who do not pass. The first weeks and months of implementation are then carefully monitored to observe the learning curve and identify the point at which worker performance indicators stabilize, reflecting that workers have reached the apex of their Learning Curve.

Speakers
KZ

Kelsey Zeller

Research Associate, Johns Hopkins University School of Public Health
Kelsey Zeller is a Research Associate with Johns Hopkins University. She has spent almost four years designing, implementing and evaluating mHealth tools in rural Bangladesh. Kelsey previously worked on the design and evaluation of mTika, an mHealth application supporting vaccination... Read More →


Thursday May 19, 2016 14:45 - 15:30
Giraffe 254

14:45

Promoting Local Ownership of Large-scale Health Projects
Limited Capacity seats available

South Africa is faced with high HIV/TB co-infection. Health officials strive to manage resources and treat HIV and TB patients in a coordinated way, but the information systems supporting this various programs have been separate and incompatible. Multiple systems place a greater burden on the national and provincial departments of health (in terms of support and training), and negatively affect health outcomes on a national level.

The TB/HIV information systems (THIS) project was initiated by the National Department of Health (NDoH) in January 2015 to integrate the collection of HIV and TB data in South African health facilities. This integration will facilitate better management of co-infected patients, integrate patient data into a single record for HIV, DS-TB and DR-TB, reduce the systems burden on provinces, and harmonize M&E for TB and HIV. It will also encourage and facilitate data use at the facility, provincial, and national levels.

This presentation describes efforts to promote local ownership of an integrated national information system, and to manage change among a diverse set of stakeholders. It looks beyond the technology and considers fundamental non-technical issues such as data collection processes, creating and driving adherence to standard operating procedures, implementation documentation and guidelines, building capacity to implement and maintain systems, and fostering a culture of data use.

Speakers
avatar for Katherine de Tolly

Katherine de Tolly

Senior Project Manager, Vital Wave
Katherine de Tolly brings years of experience working at the intersection of health and technology, particularly mHealth. She has worked on projects focused on maternal and child health, HIV, PMTCT, and TB in her native South Africa, and throughout the continent. Most recently, she... Read More →


Thursday May 19, 2016 14:45 - 15:30
Giraffe 256