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The annual ICT4D Conferences have proven to be an invaluable opportunity for NGOs, private sector organizations, universities, governmental agencies and foundations to share their experience in using ICT to increase the impact of development programs and to learn from each other.  In 2016, 715 individuals from 76 countries and 301 private sector and public sector and civil society explored the ways to harness the full power of digital solutions to achieve the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals.  Our thanks to Accenture, Catholic Relief Services, Esri, Hewlett Packard Enterprise, iMerit Technology Services, Inmarsat, IS Solutions, Making All Voices Count, Mercy Corps, Microsoft, NetHope, Oxfam, Pandexio, Qualcom Wireless Reach, RTI International, SimbaNet and World Vision for making that possible.

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02- Agriculture [clear filter]
Monday, May 16
 

10:45

Farmerline: Impact Through Information Value
Limited Capacity full

Farmerline, a social enterprise dedicated to improving the livelihood of farmers, has found strength in empowering farmers with information products providing ROI for the farmers. These empowered farmers become less risky as an investment themselves.

Farmerline’s climate-smart agronomic information product delivers good agricultural practices, weather reports, and market information systems for nine crops to farmers in order to increase their profits and make farming practices more sustainable. Created in partnership with leading socially minded meteorological technology companies and agricultural experts, the products are currently implemented in seven local Ghanaian languages. Fish farmers in Ghana saw almost 50% increase in profits over one season of utilizing these information products. Farmerline closes the information gap between farmers and the world market, while farmers pay as little as $0.09/week.

Farmerline also has a powerful android app-based data collection tool that covers many aspects of farmer support from basic farmer data collection to developing relationships with trading partners, through certification procedures, supply chain management, cataloguing and inventory. This app works with the content services to provide support to every level of farming infrastructure across West Africa.

By discussing this technology, these experiences, and asking what parts of the model are transferrable, we can approach what needs to be reimagined across sectors.



Speakers
avatar for Sessie Burns

Sessie Burns

Business Development Associate, Farmerline
Sessie is a math nerd turned policy professional with a passion for high-impact development work, data-driven interventions, and really good coffee. As a student of policy, she narrowed her international interest to focus on cross-sector development solutions, particularly in post-colonial... Read More →



Monday May 16, 2016 10:45 - 11:30
Giraffe 255

10:45

Farmforce
Limited Capacity filling up

Farmforce is a web and mobile platform built for use by large scale contract farming schemes composed of small holder farmers. The system allows these schemes to be managed with real time digital data. The system allows company agronomists & production managers to control which inputs growers apply to their fields, ensuring that that approved chemicals are used and that the correct maximum dose, pre-harvest intervals, and maximum number of applications per season are observed. The system provides support for data collection for international safety and sustainability standards such as Global GAP. Farmforce has a loan management module which supports cash and input loans calculated based on the size of farmer's fields. The Farmforce mobile application has a secure harvest purchasing module (including loan repayments) which is integrated with mobile weighing scales and a bluetooth printer for use at collection centers to improve transparency. The system captures data while online or offline enabling technical assistants capture data in very remote areas. The system provides detailed weekly production forecasts. The system supports low end android mobile phones like Samsung Galaxy Pocket which are cheap ($110), portable and easy to use.

Speakers
FK

Faith Kamenchu

Project Manager, FarmForce
NGO



Monday May 16, 2016 10:45 - 11:30
Giraffe 254

10:45

Strengthening Digital Solutions for Agriculture: User-Centered Design and Testing Processes
Limited Capacity full

In the agriculture sector, mobile solutions for farmers have failed for three main reasons: First, they're not designed with end-user input. Second, they fail to integrate advisory and financial services-providing only one or the other. Finally, they lack a range of access options-either excluding low-end device users or smartphone owners. A custom bids and offers platform, created by Souktel and Mercy Corps for Southern Africa, is the first solution that offers user-designed advisory and m-commerce services together, with full mobile money integration and multi-channel access (via USSD or app). This session will show how platform was developed from the end user perspective of small-scale farmers and agricultural product buyers. It will also demonstrate how organizations can launch and manage this platform to strengthen their own agriculture/livelihoods projects, and achieve progress toward SDGs #1 (No Poverty), #2 (Zero Hunger), and #8 (Decent Work) as a result.


Speakers
avatar for Michael Moszczynski

Michael Moszczynski

Chief Software Architect, Souktel Digital Solutions
Michael leads Souktel’s custom digital design team, directing user-centered scoping work across Africa—most recently in Zimbabwe and Liberia. He has over a decade of experience in mobile application design, interactive voice response (IVR), and network connectivity integration... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 10:45 - 11:30
Giraffe 253

11:30

Farmerline: Impact Through Information Value
Limited Capacity seats available

Farmerline, a social enterprise dedicated to improving the livelihood of farmers, has found strength in empowering farmers with information products providing ROI for the farmers. These empowered farmers become less risky as an investment themselves.

Farmerline’s climate-smart agronomic information product delivers good agricultural practices, weather reports, and market information systems for nine crops to farmers in order to increase their profits and make farming practices more sustainable. Created in partnership with leading socially minded meteorological technology companies and agricultural experts, the products are currently implemented in seven local Ghanaian languages. Fish farmers in Ghana saw almost 50% increase in profits over one season of utilizing these information products. Farmerline closes the information gap between farmers and the world market, while farmers pay as little as $0.09/week.

Farmerline also has a powerful android app-based data collection tool that covers many aspects of farmer support from basic farmer data collection to developing relationships with trading partners, through certification procedures, supply chain management, cataloguing and inventory. This app works with the content services to provide support to every level of farming infrastructure across West Africa.

By discussing this technology, these experiences, and asking what parts of the model are transferrable, we can approach what needs to be reimagined across sectors.


Speakers
avatar for Sessie Burns

Sessie Burns

Business Development Associate, Farmerline
Sessie is a math nerd turned policy professional with a passion for high-impact development work, data-driven interventions, and really good coffee. As a student of policy, she narrowed her international interest to focus on cross-sector development solutions, particularly in post-colonial... Read More →



Monday May 16, 2016 11:30 - 12:15
Giraffe 255

11:30

Farmforce
Limited Capacity seats available

Farmforce is a web and mobile platform built for use by large scale contract farming schemes composed of small holder farmers. The system allows these schemes to be managed with real time digital data. The system allows company agronomists & production managers to control which inputs growers apply to their fields, ensuring that that approved chemicals are used and that the correct maximum dose, pre-harvest intervals, and maximum number of applications per season are observed. The system provides support for data collection for international safety and sustainability standards such as Global GAP. Farmforce has a loan management module which supports cash and input loans calculated based on the size of farmer's fields. The Farmforce mobile application has a secure harvest purchasing module (including loan repayments) which is integrated with mobile weighing scales and a bluetooth printer for use at collection centers to improve transparency. The system captures data while online or offline enabling technical assistants capture data in very remote areas. The system provides detailed weekly production forecasts. The system supports low end android mobile phones like Samsung Galaxy Pocket which are cheap ($110), portable and easy to use.

Speakers
FK

Faith Kamenchu

Project Manager, FarmForce
NGO


Monday May 16, 2016 11:30 - 12:15
Giraffe 254

11:30

Strengthening Digital Solutions for Agriculture: User-Centered Design and Testing Processes
Limited Capacity filling up

In the agriculture sector, mobile solutions for farmers have failed for three main reasons: First, they're not designed with end-user input. Second, they fail to integrate advisory and financial services-providing only one or the other. Finally, they lack a range of access options-either excluding low-end device users or smartphone owners. A custom bids and offers, created by Souktel and Mercy Corps for Southern Africa, is the first solution that offers user-designed advisory and m-commerce services together, with full mobile money integration and multi-channel access (via USSD or app). This session will show how platform was developed from the end user perspective of small-scale farmers and agricultural product buyers. It will also demonstrate how organizations can launch and manage this platform to strengthen their own agriculture/livelihoods projects, and achieve progress toward SDGs #1 (No Poverty), #2 (Zero Hunger), and #8 (Decent Work) as a result.


Speakers
avatar for Michael Moszczynski

Michael Moszczynski

Chief Software Architect, Souktel Digital Solutions
Michael leads Souktel’s custom digital design team, directing user-centered scoping work across Africa—most recently in Zimbabwe and Liberia. He has over a decade of experience in mobile application design, interactive voice response (IVR), and network connectivity integration... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 11:30 - 12:15
Giraffe 253

12:15

Farmerline: Impact Through Information Value
Limited Capacity seats available

Farmerline, a social enterprise dedicated to improving the livelihood of farmers, has found strength in empowering farmers with information products providing ROI for the farmers. These empowered farmers become less risky as an investment themselves.

Farmerline's climate-smart agronomic information product delivers good agricultural practices, weather reports, and market information systems for nine crops to farmers in order to increase their profits and make farming practices more sustainable. Created in partnership with leading socially minded meteorological technology companies and agricultural experts, the products are currently implemented in seven local Ghanaian languages. Fish farmers in Ghana saw almost 50% increase in profits over one season of utilizing these information products. Farmerline closes the information gap between farmers and the world market, while farmers pay as little as $0.09/week.

Farmerline also has a powerful android app-based data collection tool that covers many aspects of farmer support from basic farmer data collection to developing relationships with trading partners, through certification procedures, supply chain management, cataloguing and inventory. This app works with the content services to provide support to every level of farming infrastructure across West Africa.

By discussing this technology, these experiences, and asking what parts of the model are transferrable, we can approach what needs to be reimagined across sectors.

Speakers
avatar for Sessie Burns

Sessie Burns

Business Development Associate, Farmerline
Sessie is a math nerd turned policy professional with a passion for high-impact development work, data-driven interventions, and really good coffee. As a student of policy, she narrowed her international interest to focus on cross-sector development solutions, particularly in post-colonial... Read More →



Monday May 16, 2016 12:15 - 13:00
Giraffe 255

12:15

Farmforce
Limited Capacity seats available

Farmforce is a web and mobile platform built for use by large scale contract farming schemes composed of small holder farmers. The system allows these schemes to be managed with real time digital data. The system allows company agronomists & production managers to control which inputs growers apply to their fields, ensuring that that approved chemicals are used and that the correct maximum dose, pre-harvest intervals, and maximum number of applications per season are observed. The system provides support for data collection for international safety and sustainability standards such as Global GAP. Farmforce has a loan management module which supports cash and input loans calculated based on the size of farmer's fields. The Farmforce mobile application has a secure harvest purchasing module (including loan repayments) which is integrated with mobile weighing scales and a bluetooth printer for use at collection centers to improve transparency. The system captures data while online or offline enabling technical assistants capture data in very remote areas. The system provides detailed weekly production forecasts. The system supports low end android mobile phones like Samsung Galaxy Pocket which are cheap ($110), portable and easy to use.

Speakers
FK

Faith Kamenchu

Project Manager, FarmForce
NGO


Monday May 16, 2016 12:15 - 13:00
Giraffe 254

12:15

Strengthening Digital Solutions for Agriculture: User-Centered Design and Testing Processes
Limited Capacity full

In the agriculture sector, mobile solutions for farmers have failed for three main reasons: First, they're not designed with end-user input. Second, they fail to integrate advisory and financial services-providing only one or the other. Finally, they lack a range of access options-either excluding low-end device users or smartphone owners. A custom bids and offers, created by Souktel and Mercy Corps for Southern Africa, is the first solution that offers user-designed advisory and m-commerce services together, with full mobile money integration and multi-channel access (via USSD or app). This session will show how platform was developed from the end user perspective of small-scale farmers and agricultural product buyers. It will also demonstrate how organizations can launch and manage this platform to strengthen their own agriculture/livelihoods projects, and achieve progress toward SDGs #1 (No Poverty), #2 (Zero Hunger), and #8 (Decent Work) as a result.


Speakers
avatar for Michael Moszczynski

Michael Moszczynski

Chief Software Architect, Souktel Digital Solutions
Michael leads Souktel’s custom digital design team, directing user-centered scoping work across Africa—most recently in Zimbabwe and Liberia. He has over a decade of experience in mobile application design, interactive voice response (IVR), and network connectivity integration... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 12:15 - 13:00
Giraffe 253

14:00

Farmbook Suite: Applying ICT in Agroenterprise for Smallholders
Limited Capacity full

Farmbook Suite is a set of ICT tools for smallholder agroenterprise support comprised of three components: Map& Track, eLearning, and Business Planner. Map & Track, a GIS-based mapping and tracking system, assists in recording services delivered and management of farmer groups for value chain operations. The e-Learning component provides a delivery method of SMART Skills courses ( including topics that assist farmers to improve income and manage natural resources) to Field Agents who train farmer groups. The third component, Business Planner, functions to build business plans, assess production costs and profitability of products. The data collected may be collected offline and then synced to a database with a reporting system to generate information for farmers, field agents, market facilitators and buyers.

Speakers
avatar for Sydney Khando

Sydney Khando

Senior Programme Manager Agriculture Livelihoods, Catholic Relief services
Sydney Khando is the Senior Programme Manager Agriculture Livelihoods for the Catholic Relief Services Malawi Country Programme. As a holder of Bachelor of Science Degree majoring in Agriculture from the University of Malawi, he has worked in various capacities in the Agricultural... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Kim Tungate

Dr. Kim Tungate

Sr Tech Advisor, CRS
Kim Tungate is an Agroenterprise Advisor for CRS. She has more than 20 years of experience in the agriculture sector. Prior to her work with CRS she worked at North Carolina State University for close to 10 years as: an Innovative Crops Program Manager and as an Agriculture Extenstion... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 14:00 - 14:45
Giraffe 253

14:00

Improving Market Access and Services for Small-Holder Farmers in Rural Kenya
Limited Capacity full

Micro and Small Enterprises (MSEs) are perceived as the engine of growth in Kenya yet face formidable constraints that hinder them from realizing their potential. The sector generates employment opportunities, provides goods and services and steers competition and innovation. According to a 2013 study conducted by the Kenya Institute for Public Policy Research and Analysis (KIPPRA); MSEs comprise about 75 % of all businesses, employ 4.6 million people (30% of the workforce), accounts for 87% of new jobs created and contributes 18.4 % of the GDP.

In Kenya, majority of the MSEs are agricultural based and women control over 80 % of the total labor in the agriculture sector. A 2010 survey funded by the World Bank revealed that the greatest barrier facing women entrepreneurs in Kenya is access to finance and is an issue because of requirements of collateral. In Kenya only 1% of women own property and that makes it very difficult for women to provide collateral for banks. Most women who venture into businesses in the rural areas and need financing lack the needed collateral to enable them secure bank loans. Further, majority of them are unbanked hence do not have historical financial information significant for securing credit services. Finance is the backbone of MSEs and any other business enterprise. These enterprises need finance to start up, expand, diversify and to sustain their day-to-day operations. Without finance, no one business enterprise can achieve its objectives.

Opportunity: Recognizing the critical role small businesses play in the Kenyan economy, the government through Kenya Vision 2030 envisages the strengthening of MSEs to become the key industries of tomorrow by improving their productivity and innovation. Further, Kenya's new Constitution focuses on giving women equal rights. It gives women property rights by calling for elimination of gender discrimination in law, customs and practices related to land and property in land. It gives married women a presumption of joint ownership of matrimonial property, defined as any property that is owned or leased by one or both spouses during the marriage and occupied by the spouses as their family home. It also protects women's interests in land, putting the onus on purchasers, lenders, and registrars to ensure that women have consented to the sale or mortgage of land in which they have an interest. Despite the adoption of the new land legislation, women operating MSEs still cannot access finance.

Speakers
avatar for Joseph Waruingi

Joseph Waruingi

Managing Director, Advantech Consulting Ltd
I am a senior business leader with demonstrable ability and experience of working on strategic change projects with boards and senior management. I lead the strategy and business development functions of our business. Under my stewardship the business has grown its Sub Saharan African... Read More →



Monday May 16, 2016 14:00 - 14:45
Giraffe 254

14:00

Plantwise: Sharing Plant Health Knowledge via ICTs
Limited Capacity seats available

Plantwise is a global programme, led by CABI, which provides farmers with the plant health knowledge they need to lose less of what they grow in order to increase food security and improve rural livelihoods. Plantwise has championed the use of ICTs over the past few years. We train our plant doctors using the PW Plant Doctor Simulator, to ensure that they are able to correctly identify pests and suggest the appropriate management solution to farmers. Together with our partners, we have piloted the introduction of SIM-equipped Android tablets at plant clinics and monitoring their impact.

Plant doctors are encouraged to use the PW Factsheet Library app to access the Plantwise Knowledge Bank (which contains over 10,000 factsheets covering 4,000 plants and 2,500 pests) and provide accurate diagnoses even when offline. The tablets also allow plant doctors to communicate with each other as well as national and international diagnostic experts via instant messaging services.

When a farmer visits a local plant clinic, their details and the diagnosis and treatment advice are all logged using an online management system. This allows Plantwise to monitor the doctors' recommendations to ensure they are accurate and comply with best practice. It also allows us to provide the clinic data to plant protection agencies and researchers, enabling them to track outbreaks of new crop pests and analyze their spread close to real time.

This presentation will be accompanied by an interactive exhibit.

Speakers
avatar for Dr. Washington Otieno

Dr. Washington Otieno

Plantwise Programme Executive, CABI
Dr Otieno has over 25 years' experience in agricultural research and development, specializing in plant protection and agricultural biosecurity. Over the past 10 years he has engaged in a number of initiatives that support improving plant health systems of developing countries, including... Read More →



Monday May 16, 2016 14:00 - 14:45
Giraffe 255

14:45

Farmbook Suite: Applying ICT in Agroenterprise for Smallholders
Limited Capacity full

Farmbook Suite is a set of ICT tools for smallholder agroenterprise support comprised of three components: Map& Track, eLearning, and Business Planner. Map & Track, a GIS-based mapping and tracking system, assists in recording services delivered and management of farmer groups for value chain operations. The e-Learning component provides a delivery method of SMART Skills courses ( including topics that assist farmers to improve income and manage natural resources) to Field Agents who train farmer groups. The third component, Business Planner, functions to build business plans, assess production costs and profitability of products. The data collected may be collected offline and then synced to a database with a reporting system to generate information for farmers, field agents, market facilitators and buyers.

Speakers
avatar for Sydney Khando

Sydney Khando

Senior Programme Manager Agriculture Livelihoods, Catholic Relief services
Sydney Khando is the Senior Programme Manager Agriculture Livelihoods for the Catholic Relief Services Malawi Country Programme. As a holder of Bachelor of Science Degree majoring in Agriculture from the University of Malawi, he has worked in various capacities in the Agricultural... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Kim Tungate

Dr. Kim Tungate

Sr Tech Advisor, CRS
Kim Tungate is an Agroenterprise Advisor for CRS. She has more than 20 years of experience in the agriculture sector. Prior to her work with CRS she worked at North Carolina State University for close to 10 years as: an Innovative Crops Program Manager and as an Agriculture Extenstion... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 14:45 - 15:30
Giraffe 253

14:45

Plantwise: Sharing Plant Health Knowledge via ICTs
Limited Capacity seats available

Plantwise is a global programme, led by CABI, which provides farmers with the plant health knowledge they need to lose less of what they grow in order to increase food security and improve rural livelihoods. Plantwise has championed the use of ICTs over the past few years. We train our plant doctors using the PW Plant Doctor Simulator, to ensure that they are able to correctly identify pests and suggest the appropriate management solution to farmers. Together with our partners, we have piloted the introduction of SIM-equipped Android tablets at plant clinics and monitoring their impact.

Plant doctors are encouraged to use the PW Factsheet Library app to access the Plantwise Knowledge Bank (which contains over 10,000 factsheets covering 4,000 plants and 2,500 pests) and provide accurate diagnoses even when offline. The tablets also allow plant doctors to communicate with each other as well as national and international diagnostic experts via instant messaging services.

When a farmer visits a local plant clinic, their details and the diagnosis and treatment advice are all logged using an online management system. This allows Plantwise to monitor the doctors' recommendations to ensure they are accurate and comply with best practice. It also allows us to provide the clinic data to plant protection agencies and researchers, enabling them to track outbreaks of new crop pests and analyze their spread close to real time.

This presentation will be accompanied by an interactive exhibit.

Speakers
avatar for Dr. Washington Otieno

Dr. Washington Otieno

Plantwise Programme Executive, CABI
Dr Otieno has over 25 years' experience in agricultural research and development, specializing in plant protection and agricultural biosecurity. Over the past 10 years he has engaged in a number of initiatives that support improving plant health systems of developing countries, including... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 14:45 - 15:30
Giraffe 255

14:45

The Data Revolution: The Path to Global Food Security
Limited Capacity full

In this presentation, the Global Open Data Initiative will demonstrate practical examples where low to high tech applications using open data is providing significant benefits to farmers and consumers alike, and will play a key role helping the world achieve SDG2 in particular, with a world both better fed and wealthier

Speakers
avatar for Andre Laperrière

Andre Laperrière

Executive Director, GODAN
During his career, Mr. Laperrière has led/managed numerous large scale projects on behalf of Private Corporations and subsequently, within the United Nations.He has extensive work experience in the Americas, Caribbean, Africa, Europe and the Middle East, in particular in developing... Read More →


ICT4D pdf

Monday May 16, 2016 14:45 - 15:30
Giraffe 254

16:00

mAgriculture: Increasing Efficiency and Improving Livelihoods
Limited Capacity full

Mobile technologies are greatly improving the quality and timeliness of services delivered by agricultural extension workers to farmers while at the same time increasing accountability and making reporting more efficient. However, as compared to other "m" fields, such as healthcare (mHealth), there has been relatively less attention to "mAgriculture", e.g., with fewer dedicated conferences and less funding.

In this presentation, Dimagi Field Manager Nele Groosman will present the wide range of ways that the CommCare mobile platform has been used in agriculture. Although originally designed for community health workers, CommCare has been deployed for four major sub-sectors of agriculture: Agricultural Extension Advisory, Value-chain Logistics, Cooperative Management and Support, and Financial Services. These use cases cover many points in the agricultural supply chain, to help agricultural programs increase efficiency and improve the livelihoods of stakeholders in of those involved in rural agriculture.

Nele will describe the process of designing and developing applications for agricultural initiatives. Participants will learn about different potential application of mobile technology to support agricultural development, as well as the challenges and considerations that come with designing and piloting ICT tools in low-resource rural settings. Dimagi has implemented 55 agricultural projects in 19 countries to date.

Speakers
avatar for Nele Groosman

Nele Groosman

Field Manager, Dimagi
Nele is passionate about using mobile technology to improve access of goods and services to rural communities. At Dimagi, she has developed numerous CommCare mobile applications for social enterprises that deliver clean water, solar lighting, health products, and agricultural inputs... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 16:00 - 16:45
Giraffe 254

16:00

Unlocking Opportunities for Smallholders
Limited Capacity seats available

Accessing to quality extension services is still a major challenge in developing countries. This is not only about the availability of the required service rather more about the awareness and willingness of the farmers to avail the services. It also observed that in addition to the public extension facilities, input supplier could play an important role in this process. BIID introduced the Zero Cost EAS model to address these multi-layer challenges in extension eco-system. The model consists of 3 major components - engagement of input supplier, integrate ICT solutions and intense communication & awareness building. The BIID model foresees a potential sustainable model with win-win business proposition for all the stakeholders. Currently BIID is implementing the model in Bangladesh in collaboration with Bangladesh Seed Association (BSA) and its members (BRAC Seed, ACI Seed, Mallika Seed and Kishan Agro Services) with support from Katalyst. Soon the model will be scaled up with the financial institutes and other input service providers.

Speakers
AN

Amolo Ng'weno

East Africa Regional Director, Bankable Frontier Associates
Amolo Ng'weno is the Bankable Frontier Associates East African Regional Director. She previously worked as the Managing Director of Digital Divide Data Kenya, a social enterprise that provides data and research services. Prior to that, she worked for the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 16:00 - 16:45
Giraffe 255

16:00

Zero Cost EAS: Making Extension Services Sustainable
Limited Capacity seats available

Accessing to quality extension services is still a major challenge in developing countries. This is not only about the availability of the required service rather more about the awareness and willingness of the farmers to avail the services. It also observed that in addition to the public extension facilities, input supplier could play an important role in this process. BIID introduced the Zero Cost EAS model to address these multi-layer challenges in extension eco-system. The model consists of 3 major components - engagement of input supplier, integrate ICT solutions and intense communication & awareness building. The BIID model foresees a potential sustainable model with win-win business proposition for all the stakeholders. Currently BIID is implementing the model in Bangladesh in collaboration with Bangladesh Seed Association (BSA) and its members (BRAC Seed, ACI Seed, Mallika Seed and Kishan Agro Services) with support from Katalyst. Soon the model will be scaled up with the financial institutes and other input service providers.

Speakers
avatar for Shahid Akbar

Shahid Akbar

Chief Executive Officer (CEO), Bangladesh Institute of ICT in Development (BIID)
Md Shahid Uddin Akbar is the Chief Executive Officer (CEO) at Bangladesh Institute of ICT in Development (BIID), an inclusive business initiative to promote the use of ICT as a tool for development. Fostering ICT integration in development initiatives and mainstreaming ICT4D in... Read More →
SN

Sumaiya Nour

Manager (Program), Bangladesh Institute of ICT in Development (BIID)
Sumaiya Nour has been working with Bangladesh Institute of ICT in Development (BIID) since 2013. She has been working as manager for programs, under which she worked in project planning, management and coordination of various projects which include among other Smart Farmer-Smart Future... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 16:00 - 16:45
Giraffe 253

16:45

mAgriculture: Increasing Efficiency and Improving Livelihoods
Limited Capacity full

Mobile technologies are greatly improving the quality and timeliness of services delivered by agricultural extension workers to farmers while at the same time increasing accountability and making reporting more efficient. However, as compared to other "m" fields, such as healthcare (mHealth), there has been relatively less attention to "mAgriculture", e.g., with fewer dedicated conferences and less funding.

In this presentation, Dimagi Field Manager Nele Groosman will present the wide range of ways that the CommCare mobile platform has been used in agriculture. Although originally designed for community health workers, CommCare has been deployed for four major sub-sectors of agriculture: Agricultural Extension Advisory, Value-chain Logistics, Cooperative Management and Support, and Financial Services. These use cases cover many points in the agricultural supply chain, to help agricultural programs increase efficiency and improve the livelihoods of stakeholders in of those involved in rural agriculture.

Nele will describe the process of designing and developing applications for agricultural initiatives. Participants will learn about different potential application of mobile technology to support agricultural development, as well as the challenges and considerations that come with designing and piloting ICT tools in low-resource rural settings. Dimagi has implemented 55 agricultural projects in 19 countries to date.

Speakers
avatar for Nele Groosman

Nele Groosman

Field Manager, Dimagi
Nele is passionate about using mobile technology to improve access of goods and services to rural communities. At Dimagi, she has developed numerous CommCare mobile applications for social enterprises that deliver clean water, solar lighting, health products, and agricultural inputs... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 16:45 - 17:30
Giraffe 254

16:45

Unlocking Opportunities for Smallholders
Limited Capacity seats available

Accessing to quality extension services is still a major challenge in developing countries. This is not only about the availability of the required service rather more about the awareness and willingness of the farmers to avail the services. It also observed that in addition to the public extension facilities, input supplier could play an important role in this process. BIID introduced the Zero Cost EAS model to address these multi-layer challenges in extension eco-system. The model consists of 3 major components - engagement of input supplier, integrate ICT solutions and intense communication & awareness building. The BIID model foresees a potential sustainable model with win-win business proposition for all the stakeholders. Currently BIID is implementing the model in Bangladesh in collaboration with Bangladesh Seed Association (BSA) and its members (BRAC Seed, ACI Seed, Mallika Seed and Kishan Agro Services) with support from Katalyst. Soon the model will be scaled up with the financial institutes and other input service providers.

Speakers
AN

Amolo Ng'weno

East Africa Regional Director, Bankable Frontier Associates
Amolo Ng'weno is the Bankable Frontier Associates East African Regional Director. She previously worked as the Managing Director of Digital Divide Data Kenya, a social enterprise that provides data and research services. Prior to that, she worked for the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 16:45 - 17:30
Giraffe 255

16:45

Zero Cost EAS: Making Extension Services Sustainable
Limited Capacity seats available

Accessing to quality extension services is still a major challenge in developing countries. This is not only about the availability of the required service rather more about the awareness and willingness of the farmers to avail the services. It also observed that in addition to the public extension facilities, input supplier could play an important role in this process. BIID introduced the Zero Cost EAS model to address these multi-layer challenges in extension eco-system. The model consists of 3 major components - engagement of input supplier, integrate ICT solutions and intense communication & awareness building. The BIID model foresees a potential sustainable model with win-win business proposition for all the stakeholders. Currently BIID is implementing the model in Bangladesh in collaboration with Bangladesh Seed Association (BSA) and its members (BRAC Seed, ACI Seed, Mallika Seed and Kishan Agro Services) with support from Katalyst. Soon the model will be scaled up with the financial institutes and other input service providers.

Speakers
avatar for Shahid Akbar

Shahid Akbar

Chief Executive Officer (CEO), Bangladesh Institute of ICT in Development (BIID)
Md Shahid Uddin Akbar is the Chief Executive Officer (CEO) at Bangladesh Institute of ICT in Development (BIID), an inclusive business initiative to promote the use of ICT as a tool for development. Fostering ICT integration in development initiatives and mainstreaming ICT4D in... Read More →
SN

Sumaiya Nour

Manager (Program), Bangladesh Institute of ICT in Development (BIID)
Sumaiya Nour has been working with Bangladesh Institute of ICT in Development (BIID) since 2013. She has been working as manager for programs, under which she worked in project planning, management and coordination of various projects which include among other Smart Farmer-Smart Future... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 16:45 - 17:30
Giraffe 253
 
Tuesday, May 17
 

10:45

Community Knowledge Workers and Ag.-Extension Tech
Limited Capacity full

Effective extension outreach is key lever for strengthening the ability of smallholder coffee farmers in East Africa to achieve sustainable and resilient livelihoods. Kenya and Uganda have underdeveloped and underfunded extension services , in particular in Bungoma County, Kenya and Mbale County, Uganda near Mt. Elgon. In response Lutheran World Relief initiated the Climate Adapted Farming on Elgon (CAFE) project that has a focus on strengthening ag-extension services through the use of ICT to meet farmers' knowledge needs.
LWR staff members Garrett Schiche, Davin Wandera, Amos Sang will present on how the use of an ICT enabled ag-extension platform has been a key lever in helping smallholder coffee farmers on Mt. Elgon in Kenya and Uganda to make progress towards Sustainable Development Goals 2, 8, and 15 related sustainable agriculture, inclusive and sustainable economic growth and the protection of terrestrial ecosystems.
They will explain how the project put local farmers and ICT at the center of its ag-extension approach and will reflect on how the use of android phones preloaded with ag-extension information and a mobile survey application were key in the success of this approach. They will also highlight the challenges that have emerged regarding the post-project sustainability of the ICT platform and consequently the long-term sustainability of project outcomes.

Speakers
DW

Davin Wandera

Project Coordinator, Lutheran World Relief
Davin Wandera is currently the Project Coordinator for the Climate Adapted farming on Elgon project funded by Lutheran World Relief. Davin also worked as an Agronomist and M&E Officer on a USAID-Kenya Horticulture competitiveness project from 2010-2014. He holds a bachelors in Agriculture... Read More →


Tuesday May 17, 2016 10:45 - 11:30
Giraffe 201

10:45

ICT for Disseminating Agronomic Advice
Limited Capacity filling up

The ATA is Government of Ethiopia (GoE) initiative with the primary aim of promoting agricultural sector transformation by supporting existing structures of government, private-sector and other non-governmental partners to address systemic bottlenecks and deliver on a priority national agenda to achieve growth and food security. The ATA’s ICT team is responsible for designing, developing, and supporting initiatives that address these systemic bottlenecks by using ICT to implement sustainable solutions.  One of these ICT is the 8028 Hotline, which is a mobile-based Interactive Voice Response (IVR) and Short Message Service (SMS) system used to disseminate agronomic advice to SMFs and other stakeholders. In 2014, the ATA designed, developed and implemented this system to disseminate year-round agronomic advice to farmers and development agents (DAs) throughout Ethiopia. The 8028 offers a range of advantages, addressing literacy barriers and character limitations for farmers, while facilitating detailed sharing of information in any Ethiopian language. To date, the system has received more than 9.4 million calls from 1.3 million registered users (of which approximately 950,000 users identified themselves as a farmer). The information collected during registration is used to broadcast additional information via IVR and SMS on topics ranging from crops disease and unseasonal rainfall to improved agronomic practices, equipping farmers and DAs with critical information needed to make informed decisions in a timely manner. The ATA is also piloting an IVR based helpdesk system, developed by Awaaz.De, in partnership with Digital Green, that will enable farmers or other users to post their questions and for experts to answer them.  

Speakers
avatar for Temesgen Gebeyehu

Temesgen Gebeyehu

ICT Technical Expert, Ethiopian Agricultural Transformation Agency (ATA)
Temesgen Gebeyehu has been working as ICT Technical Expert at ATA for the last one and half a year. Prior work experience includes working at World Vision, Millennium Village Project and UNICEF Project for 9 years. He is at the final year (2016) of the MSc. program in Information... Read More →
avatar for Ermias Teshome

Ermias Teshome

ICT Technical Expert, Ethiopian Agricultural Transformation Agency (ATA)
Ermias Teshome has been working as an ICT Technical Expert at the ATA for the last two years on two major ICT based projects, one is on the dissemination of agronomic best practices via mobile phones to the Ethiopian smallholder farmers and the other is in collecting agricultural... Read More →



Tuesday May 17, 2016 10:45 - 11:30
Giraffe 200

10:45

Innovative Business Models for ICT4D
Limited Capacity full

As the market for ICT4D solutions becomes more competitive, new business models are needed in order to continue to deliver value to customers and users. Esoko is now executing its second significant business model innovation in the company's history. In this session, we will talk broadly about business model innovation (what is it and what are some examples in developed markets?) then look at two ICT4D examples - Esoko and Zoona. We will end with some tips on business model innovation for entrepreneurs and a brief discussion of the topic with the participants.



Speakers
avatar for Hillary Miller-Wise

Hillary Miller-Wise

Founder and CEO, Tulaa
Fintech, VAS, m-agri



Tuesday May 17, 2016 10:45 - 11:30
Cub

11:30

Community Knowledge Workers and Ag.-Extension Tech
Limited Capacity seats available

Effective extension outreach is key lever for strengthening the ability of smallholder coffee farmers in East Africa to achieve sustainable and resilient livelihoods. Kenya and Uganda have underdeveloped and underfunded extension services , in particular in Bungoma County, Kenya and Mbale County, Uganda near Mt. Elgon. In response Lutheran World Relief initiated the Climate Adapted Farming on Elgon (CAFE) project that has a focus on strengthening ag-extension services through the use of ICT to meet farmers' knowledge needs.
LWR staff members Garrett Schiche, Davin Wandera, Amos Sang will present on how the use of an ICT enabled ag-extension platform has been a key lever in helping smallholder coffee farmers on Mt. Elgon in Kenya and Uganda to make progress towards Sustainable Development Goals 2, 8, and 15 related sustainable agriculture, inclusive and sustainable economic growth and the protection of terrestrial ecosystems.
They will explain how the project put local farmers and ICT at the center of its ag-extension approach and will reflect on how the use of android phones preloaded with ag-extension information and a mobile survey application were key in the success of this approach. They will also highlight the challenges that have emerged regarding the post-project sustainability of the ICT platform and consequently the long-term sustainability of project outcomes.

Speakers
DW

Davin Wandera

Project Coordinator, Lutheran World Relief
Davin Wandera is currently the Project Coordinator for the Climate Adapted farming on Elgon project funded by Lutheran World Relief. Davin also worked as an Agronomist and M&E Officer on a USAID-Kenya Horticulture competitiveness project from 2010-2014. He holds a bachelors in Agriculture... Read More →


Tuesday May 17, 2016 11:30 - 12:15
Giraffe 201

11:30

ICT for Disseminating Agronomic Advice
Limited Capacity seats available

The ATA is Government of Ethiopia (GoE) initiative with the primary aim of promoting agricultural sector transformation by supporting existing structures of government, private-sector and other non-governmental partners to address systemic bottlenecks and deliver on a priority national agenda to achieve growth and food security. The ATA’s ICT team is responsible for designing, developing, and supporting initiatives that address these systemic bottlenecks by using ICT to implement sustainable solutions.  One of these ICT is the 8028 Hotline, which is a mobile-based Interactive Voice Response (IVR) and Short Message Service (SMS) system used to disseminate agronomic advice to SMFs and other stakeholders. In 2014, the ATA designed, developed and implemented this system to disseminate year-round agronomic advice to farmers and development agents (DAs) throughout Ethiopia. The 8028 offers a range of advantages, addressing literacy barriers and character limitations for farmers, while facilitating detailed sharing of information in any Ethiopian language. To date, the system has received more than 9.4 million calls from 1.3 million registered users (of which approximately 950,000 users identified themselves as a farmer). The information collected during registration is used to broadcast additional information via IVR and SMS on topics ranging from crops disease and unseasonal rainfall to improved agronomic practices, equipping farmers and DAs with critical information needed to make informed decisions in a timely manner. The ATA is also piloting an IVR based helpdesk system, developed by Awaaz.De, in partnership with Digital Green, that will enable farmers or other users to post their questions and for experts to answer them.  

Speakers
avatar for Temesgen Gebeyehu

Temesgen Gebeyehu

ICT Technical Expert, Ethiopian Agricultural Transformation Agency (ATA)
Temesgen Gebeyehu has been working as ICT Technical Expert at ATA for the last one and half a year. Prior work experience includes working at World Vision, Millennium Village Project and UNICEF Project for 9 years. He is at the final year (2016) of the MSc. program in Information... Read More →
avatar for Ermias Teshome

Ermias Teshome

ICT Technical Expert, Ethiopian Agricultural Transformation Agency (ATA)
Ermias Teshome has been working as an ICT Technical Expert at the ATA for the last two years on two major ICT based projects, one is on the dissemination of agronomic best practices via mobile phones to the Ethiopian smallholder farmers and the other is in collecting agricultural... Read More →



Tuesday May 17, 2016 11:30 - 12:15
Giraffe 200

11:30

Innovative Business Models for ICT4D
Limited Capacity full

As the market for ICT4D solutions becomes more competitive, new business models are needed in order to continue to deliver value to customers. Esoko is testing new business model innovations in everything from its product offering to its go-to-market strategy. In this presentation, we will describe the business case for these innovations and what we are learning along the way.
 

Speakers
avatar for Hillary Miller-Wise

Hillary Miller-Wise

Founder and CEO, Tulaa
Fintech, VAS, m-agri


Tuesday May 17, 2016 11:30 - 12:15
Cub

12:15

Information Technology for Agriculture Synergy (ITAS)
Limited Capacity full

Information and communication have always mattered in agriculture. Ever since people have grown crops, raised livestock, and caught fish, they have sought information from one another. What is the most effective planting strategy on steep slopes? Where can I buy the improved seed or feed this year? How can I acquire a land title? Who is paying the highest price at the market? How can I participate in the government’s credit program? Producers rarely find it easy to obtain answers to such questions, even if similar ones arise season after season. Farmers in a village may have planted the “same” crop for centuries, but over time, weather patterns and soil conditions change and epidemics of pests and diseases come and go. Updated information allows the farmers to cope with and even benefit from these changes. Providing such knowledge can be challenging, however, because the highly localized nature of agriculture means that information must be tailored specifically to distinct conditions. iTAS (Information technology for agriculture synergy) is a social network  where the flow of products, knowledge and information between smallholder farmers groups, research institutions and consumers can be found; it is a place where they can  draw upon their ‎social capital in order to strengthen their position within the agricultural value chain.



Speakers
avatar for Mireille N'simire

Mireille N'simire

ICT Specialist, International Institute of Tropical Agriculture
Ms. Mireille Nsimire is an ICT specialist focused on ICT for development. She is actually working with farmers and Agricultural researchers to Improve agriculture production and overcome hunger in rural and under serve region of East and Central Africa. As an IT Specialist in Agribusiness... Read More →



Tuesday May 17, 2016 12:15 - 13:00
Giraffe 201

12:15

Innovative Business Models for ICT4D
Limited Capacity filling up

As the market for ICT4D solutions becomes more competitive, new business models are needed in order to continue to deliver value to customers. Esoko is testing new business model innovations in everything from its product offering to its go-to-market strategy. In this presentation, we will describe the business case for these innovations and what we are learning along the way.

Speakers
avatar for Hillary Miller-Wise

Hillary Miller-Wise

Founder and CEO, Tulaa
Fintech, VAS, m-agri


Tuesday May 17, 2016 12:15 - 13:00
Cub

12:15

Kissan Call Center: Application of ICTs in Agricultural Extension in Rural India
Limited Capacity seats available

Indian agriculture has made significant gains during the post independence period in pushing the frontiers of production and productivity for major food and non-food crops in the country. The concept of the Kissan Call Centers - KCC (Farmers' Call Center - FCC) was a logical outcome of the Government of India's commitment to leverage the ICT interventions for overcoming the constraints of distance and time in providing new generation extension services to the farmers of the country by facilitating their direct virtual contact with the agricultural extension and experts. The services include transferring knowledge to farmers, advising and educating farmers in their decision making, enabling farmers to clarify their own goals and possibilities, and stimulating desirable agricultural developments. The scope to enhance awareness and access among women farmers to the KCC helpline is huge. It was also found that the age group of 25-50 years are the biggest user group of KCC helpline. There is also evidence of farmers' satisfaction growing with repeat calls made by them to the KCCs. Analysis of satisfied farmers by the demographic profile suggests that younger farmers below 38 years of age expressed the highest levels of satisfaction. The study on KCC has shown that there is a considerable interest and acceptance among farmers for ICT based agricultural services.

Speakers
avatar for Dillip Pattanaik

Dillip Pattanaik

Team Leader, IRMA-India (ICT4D Division of OSVSWA)
Dillip, a development professional, has been relentlessly pursuing research and action research for upliftment of rural and isolated communities through various developmental activities promoting and disseminating affordable technologies. Reiterating his commitment to ensure and enhance... Read More →


Tuesday May 17, 2016 12:15 - 13:00
Giraffe 200

14:00

Affordable Data Solutions for Farmer Organizations
Limited Capacity filling up

After more than a decade of success of sustainability standards in agriculture, a debate arises on the impact of such standards and how they have contributed to improved livelihoods for small-scale farmers and their families. Unfortunately facts are difficult to demonstrate. Larger farmer-based organizations (FBOs) that run certification programs often have a low ICT-capacity and consequently no or limited technologies have been used to collect and analyze data from their certified farms and farmers.

From 2012 to 2013, THINK! Data was involved in the internal inspection program of a cocoa farmers’ association involving 16,000 members. All these members’ farms had to be inspected internally on compliance with respect to the criteria out of the cocoa standards, in their case UTZ and Rainforest Alliance. Manually assessing inspection forms of all these farms was a tremendous job, and it took all the effort and working-hours of staff at the association. Consequently, the inspection forms i.e. data that was collected in the field ended up in boxes in a storage and was not being analyzed for other purposes.  

Based on this experience, we decided to build a low-cost and easy-to-use data collection and data analysis solution for certified cooperatives, which resulted in the AuditAide solution. The data collection tools, data analysis software in combination with our AuditAide ‘roadmap’, helps FBOs to structure their internal inspection process more efficiently, combine it with other data collection activities, and makes it easier for them to analyze their data by means of a custom-designed reporting module in the software. In West Africa there are currently 4 FBOs that are using our AuditAide solution. 


Speakers
avatar for Brenda Bijen

Brenda Bijen

Social Enterpreneur & Co-founder, THINK! Data Services Ltd.
As a social entrepreneur in West Africa Brenda has worked a lot in the agricultural sector on ICT development and more particular on topics such as: (mobile) field data collection in agriculture, data collection and data management for certified producer groups, impact measurements... Read More →



Tuesday May 17, 2016 14:00 - 14:45
Giraffe 201

14:00

ICT Tools for Sustainable Agriculture- A Couple of Case Studies
Limited Capacity full

Social Enterprises such as SourceTrace Systems are leading the charge in building innovative mobile applications which operate at the last mile of agriculture value chain to empower the smallholder farmers and make the agriculture more sustainable. SourceTrace eServices Everywhereâ„¢ (ESE) Agri Solutions provide a comprehensive set of applications and tools for cooperatives, commodity companies, government and non-government agencies who are working with smallholder farmers in remote areas at the touch points of smallholder farmers.

This session focuses on a discussion of ICT tools for Sustainable Agriculture and relates the experience of deploying ICTS tools in 3 continents, Africa, Asia and Latin America in 10 countries. It includes examples of customer success stories in different countries and continents.

Speakers
avatar for Dr. Venkat Maroju

Dr. Venkat Maroju

CEO, SourceTrace Systems
Dr. Venkat Maroju is Chief Executive Officer, SourceTrace Systems – a company that has become a global leader in providing software solutions to agriculture and allied sectors. The use of these technological solutions has made the agriculture value chain more sustainable, transparent... Read More →


Tuesday May 17, 2016 14:00 - 14:45
Lioness

14:00

WeFarm - the Internet for People without the Internet
Limited Capacity full

WeFarm is a free peer-to-peer service that enables farmers to share information via SMS, without the Internet and without having to leave their farm. Farmers can ask questions on farming and receive crowd-sourced answers from other farmers around the world in minutes.

Speakers
KE

Kenneth Ewan

CEO and Founder, WeFarm
Kenny was based in Peru for 7 years as Regional Director, Latin America for an INGO, specializing in supporting local people to design and implement sustainable development projects. | He returned to the UK in 2009 as part of the Cafedirect Producers Foundation start-up team, where... Read More →


Tuesday May 17, 2016 14:00 - 14:45
Giraffe 200

14:45

ICT Tools for Sustainable Agriculture- A Couple of Case Studies
Limited Capacity seats available

Social Enterprises such as SourceTrace Systems are leading the charge in building innovative mobile applications which operate at the last mile of agriculture value chain to empower the smallholder farmers and make the agriculture more sustainable. SourceTrace eServices Everywhereâ„¢ (ESE) Agri Solutions provide a comprehensive set of applications and tools for cooperatives, commodity companies, government and non-government agencies who are working with smallholder farmers in remote areas at the touch points of smallholder farmers.

This session focuses on a discussion of ICT tools for Sustainable Agriculture and relates the experience of deploying ICTS tools in 3 continents, Africa, Asia and Latin America in 10 countries. It includes examples of customer success stories in different countries and continents.

Speakers
avatar for Dr. Venkat Maroju

Dr. Venkat Maroju

CEO, SourceTrace Systems
Dr. Venkat Maroju is Chief Executive Officer, SourceTrace Systems – a company that has become a global leader in providing software solutions to agriculture and allied sectors. The use of these technological solutions has made the agriculture value chain more sustainable, transparent... Read More →


Tuesday May 17, 2016 14:45 - 15:30
Lioness

14:45

Satellite and GEO-ICT Data for Precision Agriculture
Limited Capacity full

mPower social enterprises ltd. is providing ICT support to implement geodata based projects in Bangladesh which aims to provide cost-effective but actionable and targeted agriculture information to rural farmers in Bangladesh especially regarding weather and disease. By partnering with geo-information service providers this project we use satellite image to analyse the crop growth and based on this growth information we send targeted information to farmers about best agronomoy practises for this particular growth stage through SMS. In collaboration with local weather department we also provide targeted weather information to vegetable farmers about early warning so that they can take preventaive measure to protect their crop.

We also work extensively with Wageningen university in Netherlands on a project named Geopotato, where we are building a model to predict late blight disease of potato. Late blight is a major disease of potato all across the world and farmers often spray every week as part of preventive mechanism which is very expensive This forecasting model will alert the potato growers in Bangladesh when probablity of infection is high so that they can do preventive spraying which will reduce the chance of blight attack and as well as the production cost.

In this session the key empahises will be to present the range of applications satellite data can bring to agriculture across the globe, how such service can be designed and implemented easily, learnings and challenges of existing projects that we are implementing. 

Speakers
avatar for Sadman Sadek

Sadman Sadek

Team Lead, Service Innovation, mPower Social Enterprises Limited
Sadman Sadek is working as Technical Coordinator in mPower and has years of experience in designing and implementing sustainable ICT solutions in the area of agriculture, health, livestock & digital finance. He is a key member of mPower eAgriculture unit and providing support to three... Read More →



Tuesday May 17, 2016 14:45 - 15:30
Giraffe 201

14:45

WeFarm - the Internet for People without the Internet
Limited Capacity full

WeFarm is a free peer-to-peer service that enables farmers to share information via SMS, without the Internet and without having to leave their farm. Farmers can ask questions on farming and receive crowd-sourced answers from other farmers around the world in minutes.

Speakers
KE

Kenneth Ewan

CEO and Founder, WeFarm
Kenny was based in Peru for 7 years as Regional Director, Latin America for an INGO, specializing in supporting local people to design and implement sustainable development projects. | He returned to the UK in 2009 as part of the Cafedirect Producers Foundation start-up team, where... Read More →


Tuesday May 17, 2016 14:45 - 15:30
Giraffe 200

16:00

Smart ICT for Managing Irrigation and Floods in Africa
Limited Capacity seats available

The Surface Energy Balance Algorithm (SEBAL) has been applied to DMC satellite and MODIS sensors for estimation of crop water requirements for the farm blocks and a unique combination of crop water requirements and deficit were transferred through ICT-enabled services to assist small farmers in Sudan, Egypt and Ethiopia for undertaking actions. The customized information allowed them to plan at the individual field scale not what to plant and irrigate but when the weather conditions will be just right for maximum productivity and profits. Further, potential application of satellite-based rainfall estimates and flood forecasting model through a distributed modeling using remote sensing was developed for Gash River Basin in Sudan. The model was tested during the 2013 floods at real time, 3-hour intervals. The accuracy of the estimated peak flood discharge and lag time was found to be good with reference to field observation data. Flood forecasting lead time is increased by 12 hours compared to conventional methods of forecasting. With this remote-sensing-ICT based hydrological modeling approach, the accuracy in discharge computations has improved when compared to conventional methods, flood forecasting can be carried out at any river confluence and the influence of any tributary can be examined separately. Web and mobile-based smart ICT helped in real time sharing of actionable advice with the water managers, water user associations and individual farmers. These tools helped in improving the productivity and reduce vulnerability of small holder farmers in Africa. Business models have been developed for adoption and plans are underway for largescale upscaling.

Speakers
avatar for Dr. Bharat Sharma

Dr. Bharat Sharma

Scientist Emeritus (WR), International Water Management Institute
Bharat R Sharma has over 30 years experience in natural resources management research especially for surface and ground water resources, on-farm and rainwater management. His key contributions included improving large irrigation commands, assessment and management of groundwater in... Read More →



Tuesday May 17, 2016 16:00 - 16:45
Giraffe 200

16:00

The Role of Digital Development in Feed the Future
Limited Capacity full

Most applications of digital tools in a particular development program or activity are done in a one-off fashion: a digital financial service here, some geospatial work there, real time data capture in some geographies, or perhaps an effort to extend connectivity in some other locales. The focus is often on the product, service or application to be rolled out, and less on what is required in order to ensure the product is successful in supporting the development initiative. Rarely is the suite of digital technologies employed to allow this to happen, including infrastructural or systems-level investments that underpin broad uptake of digital services.

The emerging practice of "Digital Development" (formerly "ICT for Development") now recognizes the need for a "whole of digital approach" that includes identifying and addressing issues that almost every developing country faces. These include digital literacy, lack of connectivity (especially in rural areas) and lack of mobile phone ownership, particularly for women, as well as a dearth of locally relevant content delivered through mobile and Internet-enabled devices. This whole of digital approach is critical both for driving national economic growth but also for meeting overarching objectives for any development sector that incorporates digital tools. This is particularly true for agricultural productivity.

USAID has been employing a variety of digital tools for several years, as have its implementing partners, albeit in often an ad hoc manner. Now, the U.S. Global Development Lab and the Bureau of Food Security have recently joined forces to bring this Digital Development approach to Feed the Future. Through a new three-year collaboration, the two bureaus are working with Feed the Future teams at the country level to bring a variety of tools to bear. Activity areas include: digital financial services, mobile-based agricultural extension delivery, real-time data collection and geospatial visualization, affordable connectivity, digital literacy, enabling environment-strengthening at policy and regulatory levels, in-community technical assistance, market gap research, new generation public-private partnerships, and innovative applications of frontier technologies such as drones and low-cost remote sensors.

The nexus of many of these will be presented to drive home a critical point: When Feed the Future was first launched in 2010, the promise of mobile and digital technologies had not yet been delivered. Fast-forward five years and it is starting to emerge; strong market forces are paving the way for the most underserved populations to maximize such tools to meet their livelihood wants and needs. Yet much more must be done, deliberately, to ensure the growing digital economy is fully inclusive.

This presentation will draw upon various data points and points of intersection that demonstrate why a holistic approach to digital development is one fundamental way to ensure digital technologies reach their true potential in agricultural productivity. It will make the case of what must be done to delivery on this vision. And it will showcase what USAID and its partners are doing to strengthen such efforts.

Speakers
avatar for Christopher Burns

Christopher Burns

Sr. Coordinator, Digital Development for Feed the Future, USAID
Christopher Burns is the Senior Coordinator, Digital Development for Feed the Future. In this capacity, he leads a nimble technical team within the U.S. Global Development Lab, working alongside the Bureau for Food Security, to integrate a suite of digital technologies into Feed the... Read More →



Tuesday May 17, 2016 16:00 - 16:45
Giraffe 201

16:45

Smart ICT for Managing Irrigation and Floods in Africa
Limited Capacity seats available

The Surface Energy Balance Algorithm (SEBAL) has been applied to DMC satellite and MODIS sensors for estimation of crop water requirements for the farm blocks and a unique combination of crop water requirements and deficit were transferred through ICT-enabled services to assist small farmers in Sudan, Egypt and Ethiopia for undertaking actions. The customized information allowed them to plan at the individual field scale not what to plant and irrigate but when the weather conditions will be just right for maximum productivity and profits. Further, potential application of satellite-based rainfall estimates and flood forecasting model through a distributed modeling using remote sensing was developed for Gash River Basin in Sudan. The model was tested during the 2013 floods at real time, 3-hour intervals. The accuracy of the estimated peak flood discharge and lag time was found to be good with reference to field observation data. Flood forecasting lead time is increased by 12 hours compared to conventional methods of forecasting. With this remote-sensing-ICT based hydrological modeling approach, the accuracy in discharge computations has improved when compared to conventional methods, flood forecasting can be carried out at any river confluence and the influence of any tributary can be examined separately. Web and mobile-based smart ICT helped in real time sharing of actionable advice with the water managers, water user associations and individual farmers. These tools helped in improving the productivity and reduce vulnerability of small holder farmers in Africa. Business models have been developed for adoption and plans are underway for largescale upscaling.

Speakers
avatar for Dr. Bharat Sharma

Dr. Bharat Sharma

Scientist Emeritus (WR), International Water Management Institute
Bharat R Sharma has over 30 years experience in natural resources management research especially for surface and ground water resources, on-farm and rainwater management. His key contributions included improving large irrigation commands, assessment and management of groundwater in... Read More →



Tuesday May 17, 2016 16:45 - 17:30
Giraffe 200

16:45

The Role of Digital Development in Feed the Future
Limited Capacity filling up

Most applications of digital tools in a particular development program or activity are done in a one-off fashion: a digital financial service here, some geospatial work there, real time data capture in some geographies, or perhaps an effort to extend connectivity in some other locales. The focus is often on the product, service or application to be rolled out, and less on what is required in order to ensure the product is successful in supporting the development initiative. Rarely is the suite of digital technologies employed to allow this to happen, including infrastructural or systems-level investments that underpin broad uptake of digital services.

The emerging practice of "Digital Development" (formerly "ICT for Development") now recognizes the need for a "whole of digital approach" that includes identifying and addressing issues that almost every developing country faces. These include digital literacy, lack of connectivity (especially in rural areas) and lack of mobile phone ownership, particularly for women, as well as a dearth of locally relevant content delivered through mobile and Internet-enabled devices. This whole of digital approach is critical both for driving national economic growth but also for meeting overarching objectives for any development sector that incorporates digital tools. This is particularly true for agricultural productivity.

USAID has been employing a variety of digital tools for several years, as have its implementing partners, albeit in often an ad hoc manner. Now, the U.S. Global Development Lab and the Bureau of Food Security have recently joined forces to bring this Digital Development approach to Feed the Future. Through a new three-year collaboration, the two bureaus are working with Feed the Future teams at the country level to bring a variety of tools to bear. Activity areas include: digital financial services, mobile-based agricultural extension delivery, real-time data collection and geospatial visualization, affordable connectivity, digital literacy, enabling environment-strengthening at policy and regulatory levels, in-community technical assistance, market gap research, new generation public-private partnerships, and innovative applications of frontier technologies such as drones and low-cost remote sensors.

The nexus of many of these will be presented to drive home a critical point: When Feed the Future was first launched in 2010, the promise of mobile and digital technologies had not yet been delivered. Fast-forward five years and it is starting to emerge; strong market forces are paving the way for the most underserved populations to maximize such tools to meet their livelihood wants and needs. Yet much more must be done, deliberately, to ensure the growing digital economy is fully inclusive.

This presentation will draw upon various data points and points of intersection that demonstrate why a holistic approach to digital development is one fundamental way to ensure digital technologies reach their true potential in agricultural productivity. It will make the case of what must be done to delivery on this vision. And it will showcase what USAID and its partners are doing to strengthen such efforts.

Speakers
avatar for Christopher Burns

Christopher Burns

Sr. Coordinator, Digital Development for Feed the Future, USAID
Christopher Burns is the Senior Coordinator, Digital Development for Feed the Future. In this capacity, he leads a nimble technical team within the U.S. Global Development Lab, working alongside the Bureau for Food Security, to integrate a suite of digital technologies into Feed the... Read More →



Tuesday May 17, 2016 16:45 - 17:30
Giraffe 201
 
Wednesday, May 18
 

10:45

FGPS Mapping Assisting Agricultural Value Chains in Farmer 2 Farmer Program
Limited Capacity seats available

Catholic Relief Services (CRS) is implementing a five year USAID funded Farmer to Farmer (F2F) program in East Africa (Kenya Ethiopia, Uganda and Tanzania). The program links US volunteers with host organizations to conduct short assignments of 2 to 3 weeks, addressing pre identified bottlenecks in the development of key agricultural value chains including horticulture, grain, maize oilseeds livestock and dairy. Assignments largely focus on improving on farm production, leadership and strategic planning, marketing, and natural resource conservation. The goal of the program is to improve livelihood and nutritional status of 19,000 households in the region.

GPS mapping was undertaken of key points along several value chains (from production in the field, to collection points, processing and distribution centers) in Kenya to visually see synergies and efficiencies along the value chains. Sites plotted include host organization offices, producers' fields, input stores, collection centers, processing plants, roads, micro-finance institutions and commercial banks among others. Data has been synthesized online, used to create visual spatial maps that show all project sites, support infrastructure and identify more efficient interventions along the value chain. Using overlays from already existing GPS maps, the developed maps were used to analyze patterns that cannot be observed in ordinary situations, understand vulnerabilities and provide opportunities for improving agricultural value chain conditions.
Though significant achievement has been made in developing these value chains, through volunteer technical support, achieving project objectives with a lean budget and extensive coverage, is still a big challenge. Spatial data allowed the project to effectively target its interventions as well as plan for improving beneficiary access to inputs, markets, value addition, and stakeholder linkages among others. Using GIS mapping allows for data collection, visuals, and then analysis to support the development of efficient and effective leveraging interventions along the value chain with greater prospects for sustainability.

Speakers
avatar for Peter Kariuki

Peter Kariuki

Program Manager-MEAL, Catholic Relief Services
Peter Mureithi Kriuki is a Monitoring, Evaluation, Accountability and Learning (MEAL) professional with over seven years experience integrating ICT in MEAL activities in 7 countries in Africa. He hold a Masters degree in environmental studies and community development and is undertaking... Read More →


Wednesday May 18, 2016 10:45 - 11:50
Ivory - Partition 1

10:45

Narrative Storytelling Videos in Agricultural Technology Learning and Adoption
Limited Capacity filling up

In this session, I’m going to present how agricultural training videos featuring narrative stories are created. I’m going to share experience on

-developing non-scripted video storyboard,

-engaging farmer actors in co-creating video content

-integrating the technical steps with the narrative stories

Lastly, I will share our evaluation of these videos on the farmers’ learning and testing of the agricultural technology.

Video-based training provide opportunities to rural population to access reliable information about agricultural technologies. However, questions about how to design video content, who to present the messages and what to present are not well explored. Narrative storytelling, as an approach to create video content, normally involves farmers with experience of the technology as actors to share their stories about learning and implementation of certain technology. Farmers actors are encouraged to share personal stories including how they develop the motivations of learning and testing, how they overcome challenges during the testing and etc.,. This kind of video integrates technical content and narrative content together, and intends to psychologically and social prepare the farmers in their technology learning and adoption.

A field test conducted in Malawi shows that, after viewing the video, participants saw connection between the narrative video content (i.e. the farmer actors' appearance, social identity, and constraints described in the video) and their real lives. Moreover, participants were inspired by the narratives shared by their fellow farmers who acted in the video, which seemed associated with their adjustment of existing mindsets about low crop productivity as well as gender relations. For example, women were motivated to overcome the gender stereotype which hinder their testing of the new technology. Such adjustments encouraged participants to consider strategic solutions to overcome the social and cultural constraints of learning and testing the technology.


Speakers
avatar for Tian Cai

Tian Cai

Research Associate, Michigan State University
I explore how to design and create extension training content preparing people, especially farmers, in the developing world learn and adopt agricultural technology. I also study how the content delivered by these ICT approaches could encourage the farmers to change their mindset... Read More →



Wednesday May 18, 2016 10:45 - 11:50
Jambo Conference Centre E

11:50

Reaching the Rural Unconnected
Limited Capacity full

Farmer to Farmer videos in local languages distributed in places without electricity, internet or even mobile signal. Access Agriculture shows what is possible with suitable off-line technology. This is a very practical demonstration of the Smart Projector loaded with Access Agriculture videos.

Speakers
FC

Francis Chepyegon

ICT Manager, Access Agriculture
Francis has been part of Access Agriculture since it was founded 3.5 years ago.  He has assisted at the main training weeks for production of “farmer to farmer” style videos in local languages.  Previously with Heifer International, Francis has overseen the inputting of material... Read More →


Wednesday May 18, 2016 11:50 - 12:50
Jambo Conference Centre E

11:50

The Influence of ICT on Improvement of Farming Business and Increasing Support Efficiency
Limited Capacity seats available

The nut sector has a bright future. However the current production systems in Africa are sub optimal, which is both a missed opportunity for farmers as for the industry. But how to create a closer collaboration between the different actors to work on improvement of production that results in higher income for the farmers?

A MIS system, 3S (Sustainable Supply System), was developed to benchmark performances at farmers level, in order to clarify where to improve what. This system is currently being implemented in such a way that middlemen are eliminated, training has becoming more adopted to the specific needs of farmers and costs are decreasing. At this stage the system is being implemented at 7 factories all over Africa and will soon become a standard in cashew. It will soon move to other nuts.

The 3S system is creating full traceability from farmer to retail shelf and is positioned as a 'beyond certification system' in which verification is the key, instead of the quite expensive certification. For more info: www.supply3s.com

Speakers
avatar for Herman uit de Bosch

Herman uit de Bosch

Executive Director, FairMatch Support
Herman uit de Bosch is founder and Managing Director of FairMatch Support. He has many years of experience in developing sustainable supply chains and matching companies with (small) producers. He was closely involved in sector wide initiatives like 3S, FSC, BCI, FLO and was co-founder... Read More →


Wednesday May 18, 2016 11:50 - 12:50
Ivory - Partition 1

13:50

How Technology Can Improve the Resilience of Pastoral People
Limited Capacity seats available

The world of technology is revolutionizing how we can improve natural resource management and provide services to pastoral people. Pastoral people are often landless, have limited education, and members of marginal cultural groups. Services that improve resilience to these people are necessary to reduce poverty and improve livelihoods. The web, camera phones, and gps can provide information to inform our decision making on program implementation and services for beneficiaries in ways that were not done before. The three technologies that I would like to discuss are assessing ground vegetation cover with a camera phone, providing improved livestock management and services with GPS collars, and reporting animal diseases through EMPRESi. The major difficulties that pastoralists face are; insufficient forage (often a result of overgrazing), diseases and limited veterinary services, and access to water. All three of these factors can be addressed through the use of new technology.
GPS Collars:
A handful of GPS collars on a few herds in the state of Rajasthan, India was able to inform government policy on where wells should be located to reduce overgrazing, where veterinary services should be located, and what forages pastoral people were most dependent on by livestock type. Conflict between agriculturalists and pastoralists exist in many parts of the world and pastoral people are increasingly blamed for destruction in nationally protected areas in India and in many parts of the world. Coupling gps data on where animals stop to graze with well locations and classified imagery tells us what animals are eating, where they are drinking, and what areas can be better utilized for sustainable management. The information that was collected showed that the pastoralists were most dependent on crop stubble and that they were providing services to farmers to clear their fields. It also showed that they were not utilizing forage in nationally protected areas. The government can easily identify where wills should be located to reduce overgrazing on key migratory routes to market and where veterinary services should be located. Further project interventions on improving forage quality can also be better targeted in terms of location and what types of improved forages would have the greatest benefit. Security is also a concern and security checkpoints can be established. Household surveys were also informative on profiling what types of people are most likely to take such long migrations. A governmental and stakeholder meeting was held to inform policy and the Raika where made aware of where veterinary services exist along their migratory route. When 40% of livestock are lost on treacherous migratory routes such information can be key in improving resilience of pastoral people.


Camera Phones:
Pictures from camera phones matched with image recognition software can inform us of forage quality. Forage "greenness" can be determined from satellite imagery and with field data can provide forage predictions for 30, 60, and 90 days. Forage prediction maps are provided to pastoralists in a few developing countries. Forage "greenness" also informs livestock insurance schemes being developed by ILRI for pastoralists in Western Kenya. While such information is incredibly useful for helping pastoralists make decisions in the absence of any information, "greenness" does not always equal food for livestock. There are many "green" plants that livestock simply cannot eat, for example, many types of trees, and invasive plants. Satellite imagery also has difficulty picking up vegetation that is close to the ground.
Simple camera phones can take pictures of the vegetation on the ground that can be used to make improved forage maps using a software called VegMeasure. Our research team aims to make this into a mobile app with digital recognition software to create real-time maps on forage quality and availability to provide better information to pastoralists. Pictures from camera phones can be used to perform forage assessments that can inform how many grazing permits to allocate in communal rangelands and public parks. Such information assists in sustainably managing pastures while the climate around us becomes more variable, making the need for improved and real-time information more of a necessity for sustainable management.
EMPRESi
EMPRESi is an initiation from the Food and Agriculture Organization at the United Nations where animal diseases are reported and mapped on a publically available map. This information helps mobilize international actors to provide needed disease prevention services and can help governments decide where services are most needed, it also helps national governments respond quickly to the control and spread of disease. A mobile app was developed and piloted in Uganda for government workers. Many pastoralists decide their migratory paths based on the absence of disease and such information can help pastoralists prevent further animal losses. Animals often serve not only as a revenue source but as a mobile bank account, as a result animal losses from disease can have a detrimental effect on pastoral people. Using technology to help promptly respond to animal diseases before they spread further and significantly affect pastoral resilience.

Speakers
avatar for Dr. Kathryn Clifton

Dr. Kathryn Clifton

Post Doctoral Fellow in Landscape Ecology, International Center for Agriculture Research in the Dry Areas
Kathryn is interested in how research can be integrated into development projects to provide improved services, decision making, innovation, and out scaling of proven approaches. Kathryn is a researcher for the International Center for Agriculture Research in the Dry Areas in Amman... Read More →


Wednesday May 18, 2016 13:50 - 14:55
Ivory - Partition 1

13:50

More Voices, More Choices: Using Interactive Voice Response (IVR) for Engagement
Limited Capacity full

Real-time data collection. Toll-free information hotlines. On-demand reporting mechanisms. What do these tools have in common? They all rely on Interactive Voice Response (IVR) technology to facilitate two-way communication with basic phones, instantly crossing barriers of language, literacy and logistics. VOTO Mobile, a fast growing social enterprise headquartered in Ghana, enables organizations anywhere in the world to use a combination of mobile technologies such IVR, SMS and USSD to design, pilot and scale behavior change campaigns, national level research, massive content libraries, interactive media programs and toll-free hotlines across multiple sectors.
The ability for practitioners to transcend these barriers to engage in meaningful two-way conversations with end-beneficiaries is becoming increasingly important for enabling impact, particularly in the context of achieving SDGs. This workshop will take audience through the potentials of IVR through case studies and use cases from organizations including the World Bank, UNICEF, HNI, FHI360 etc. and will guide them on how to build an IVR program on the VOTO platform in minutes by setting up their own demo. The training will also discuss methodologies to optimize mobile engagement rates and will enable audience to think through enhancing their programs by adopting IVR for increased interaction with their beneficiaries.

Speakers
avatar for Neema Iyer

Neema Iyer

Regional Director of Programs, VOTO Mobile
Neema is the Regional Director of Programs for East Africa at VOTO Mobile. She works with various partners to design and implement M4D projects across health, agriculture, governance, energy and education, using interactive mobile technologies such as SMS, IVR and USSD. With a background... Read More →



Wednesday May 18, 2016 13:50 - 14:55
Jambo Conference Centre E

14:55

Identifying Recommendation Domains for Scaling-Out Improved Crop Varieties
Limited Capacity seats available

More than 30% of population in Saharan Africa is undernourished and the demand for food is projected to increase due to high population growth rate. Recent agronomic research has generated innovative technologies to increase food production and quality. Development programs and extension services has invested significant effort to promote adoption and scaling out of best-bet agronomic technologies. Achievement of the potential impacts of these innovative technologies is hindered by low adoption by farmers. Proper targeting of sites to scale out agricultural technologies is a key determinant of the rate of adoption. Targeting locations with similar biophysical and socio-economic characteristics significantly increase probability of adoption. Recommendation domains (RDs) are homogeneous areas with similar biophysical and socio-economic characteristics. We demonstrate the potential of geospatial analysis in identifying RDs for scaling best-bet agronomic technologies. We use GIS and remote sensing generated data to generate homogeneous clusters that exhibit similar biophysical and socio-economic characteristics in the FtF zone in Tanzania. Results identifies 20 sustainable recommendation domains (SRDs) and the main bio-socio-economic gradients that discriminate them. These SRDs were generated after excluding critical ecosystems and non-agricultural land. We propose an Impact Based Spatial Targeting Index (IBSTI) as an evidence-based tool for guiding spatial targeting of agricultural technologies based on their estimated potential impact(s). The utilized data-driven clustering method is suitable for identifying SRDs in regions with limited technology trials data but can be replicated in different ecologies and technologies. Results demonstrate the potential of geospatial tools in generating evidence-based policies for scaling-out innovative agricultural technologies.

Key words: Agricultural technologies, cluster analysis, Feed the Future, Impact Based Spatial Targeting Index, GIS, recommendation domains, scaling out, spatial targeting, Tanzania


Speakers
avatar for Francis Muthoni

Francis Muthoni

GIS Specialist, IITA
Francis is a GIS Specialist at the International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA) based in Arusha, Tanzania. Francis serves in the USAID funded Africa RISING project. Francis has undertaken geo-spatial analysis to generate recommendation domains for scaling out best-bet agronomic... Read More →



Wednesday May 18, 2016 14:55 - 16:00
Ivory - Partition 1

14:55

When Communities Manage Climate Adaptive Technology
Limited Capacity full

There are a quarter of a billion pastoralists in Africa using basic and increasingly unreliable methods to find adequate grazing. Project Concern International (PCI) has successfully completed a proof of concept called Satellite Assisted Pastoral Resource Management (SAPARM), which provides pastoralists with community maps of current grazing conditions using satellite-derived vegetation data. With the support of cross-sector partnerships, PCI is now expanding the testing of SAPARM through a randomized control trial covering a population of over one million people in Ethiopia and Tanzania. Early results revealed a 78% use of maps in pastoralist migration decision-making in challenging climate conditions and a 47% reduction of the high livestock mortality rates. SAPARM is not only an intervention supporting the Sustainable Development Goals of combatting the impacts of climate change and ending hunger, but by design, an ICT-enabled solution that helps to build a more resilient infrastructure. Michael Mulford, PCI Tanzania Country Director, will present on how the use of the SAPARM, the fusion of typically inaccessible technology with indigenous systems and structures, enables ICTs like internet access and digital services to be relevant and useful for decision-making by local populations to improve their livelihoods. He will share the lessons PCI is learning on what it takes to not only make satellite data readily available to pastoralists, but also adapted and adoptable.

Speakers
MM

Michael Mulford

Country Director, PCI
With 15 years of international relief and development experience, Michael Mulford has sought to apply ICT solutions to better understand and address challenges in rural settings in Sub-Saharan Africa. He currently manages a diverse program portfolio in Tanzania that is implementing... Read More →



Wednesday May 18, 2016 14:55 - 16:00
Jambo Conference Centre E

16:30

Assessing Use of Mobile ICT to Train Farmers
Limited Capacity filling up

Delivering high quality extension services, training in improved agricultural practices and better access to information for smallholder farmers is agricultural development in the global South. However, while the two other requirements for successful development of agricultural value chains, access to improved inputs and new market linkages, will scale due to their private sector delivery channels, farmer training has traditionally relied on face-to-face interaction with extension workers or corruptible word-of-mouth transmission. The way we do this has important consequences for the cost effectiveness of our projects.
Farm Africa tested the use of mobile technology as a possible alternative to the traditional 'farmer field school' approach in a sesame project in northern Tanzania. Farmers viewed interactive training modules in their local language, containing locally-produced videos and images on tablet computers. Results indicate that most farmers trained using tablets enjoyed the experience, and achieved similar increases in knowledge of sesame cultivation as those trained by demonstration plots, but for around a third of the cost, with further economies when scaled up. 96% of farmers trained with ICT introduced changes to their farming practices after viewing the tablet course.

Speakers
avatar for Steve Ball

Steve Ball

Country Director for Tanzania, Farm Africa
Steve Ball is Country Director for Farm Africa in Tanzania. He has 12 years experience in rural development in Tanzania, working in both natural resources and agricultural development sectors. Previously to that he worked in the corporate IT sector in London as a Systems Architec... Read More →


Wednesday May 18, 2016 16:30 - 17:30
Ivory - Partition 1
 
Thursday, May 19
 

10:45

Deploying Mobile Tech to Scale Impact
Limited Capacity full

Digital innovations are transforming how organizations enable communities to lift themselves out of poverty. NGOs, social enterprises and nonprofits on the frontlines of global development are deploying mobile tech to better understand their impact and their added value they have in the communities they operate in. Our panel session will act as a forum to educate and engage attendees about how leading organizations such as Solar Sister, d.light and iDE have deployed mobile technology such as TaroWorks in the field, how they are using it to improve and scale their impact as well as share best practices. In addition, panelists will offer a candid take on the challenges and successes they've had to date leveraging mobile tech.

Leading the panel will be Emily Tucker, CEO of TaroWorks. TaroWorks is a solution which enables organizations working in the most remote parts of the planet to collect data, monitor their impact, and manage field operations in real-time using mobile devices. Emily will discuss with panelists and attendees how mobile tech is transforming how organizations can collect, monitor and understand data to gain new insights on how they can improve the lives of the world's poor.

Attendees will come away from the panel session knowing what mobile technologies such as TaroWorks makes possible, and the use cases that make it promising in helping organizations fight poverty.

Speakers
avatar for Emily Tucker

Emily Tucker

CEO, TaroWorks
Emily has spent the last four years as CEO of TaroWorks, where she has helped over 70 organizations across 30 countries leverage mobile tech to improve the lives of the world's poor. Prior to TaroWorks, Emily worked at Grameen Foundation for over 10 years, most recently as Director... Read More →


Thursday May 19, 2016 10:45 - 11:30
Giraffe 201

10:45

Partner Led Technology in El Salvador and Nicaragua
Limited Capacity seats available

In 2014 SCIAF were awarded a Big Lottery Fund (BLF) for a project in El Salvador and Nicaragua to improve food security and income of vulnerable rural people through sustainable food production. SCIAF works exclusively through partnership and the BLF grant is implemented by SCIAF through 5 local partners, 3 in El Sal and 2 in Nicaragua. At the outset SCIAF hired a consultant to assist in a partner led baseline to facilitate participatory design of baseline tools with partners and communities, facilitate data collection by the partners and from the baseline tools, design annual data collection tools. The approach aimed to promote participation and data ownership.
SCIAF together with the implementing partners and the consultant Rodolfo Valdez Morales came up with a system to collect data using both paper and open source software on the partners own phones, all data was entered on to a shared database held on desktops and collated on a private server. The database enabled those involved in the project to access analyzed data and project specific report in real time. Likewise a number of methods were used to train and troubleshoot with partners including workshops, field testing, video tutorials and skype meetings. The system was reviewed by SCIAF and partners and extended to a second project which uses only open source software on partners' phones to collect data. The project is funded by the European Union to promote young rural technicians promote sustainable communities through agro-ecology.

Speakers
avatar for Ciara Commins

Ciara Commins

International Programme Officer and T4D Lead, Scottish Catholic International Aid Fund (SCIAF)
Ciara Commins, has a background in Civil and Environmental engineering and has worked in the NGO sector for a number of years as Programme Officer and lead on T4D pilots and projects for Caritas agencies.



Thursday May 19, 2016 10:45 - 11:30
Giraffe 200

11:30

Audio Knowledge for Remote Communities
Limited Capacity seats available

Literacy Bridge developed the Talking Book as a low-cost, simple, and durable audio device to provide on-demand access to locally relevant knowledge across many sectors and SDGs. The Talking Book also collects user feedback, usage statistics, and interactive quiz results.

We will demonstrate the functionality of the battery-powered Talking Book and explain how local users designed it to address challenges found in the most underserved rural communities, such as illiteracy, numerous dialects, unreliable electricity and networks, and unequal access to technology for marginalized groups including women and girls.

We will discuss some of the early deployment problems and how the product became packaged as part of a service that includes behavior change communication design, content strategy, audio production, and monitoring, learning, and evaluation.

We will demonstrate new features in 2016 such as the cloud-based dashboard presenting key performance indications and data exploration so partners can immediately and transparently access the state of deployment and user interaction-- even those in remote communities with networks.

Finally, we will share newly developed best practices for partnerships. Literacy Bridge is now shifting from bilateral to multilateral partnerships, so that partners like UNICEF can develop maternal & child health content that is deployed alongside farming instruction for women farmer's in CARE International's Village Savings and Loan Associations.

Speakers
avatar for Cliff Schmidt

Cliff Schmidt

Founder & Executive Director, Literacy Bridge
Cliff founded Literacy Bridge in 2007 to make agriculture and health knowledge accessible to people without literacy skills in remote rural areas. He created an audio-based device called the "Talking Book", which led to a fellowship award presented by Bill Gates and a Clinton Global... Read More →



Thursday May 19, 2016 11:30 - 12:15
Giraffe 201

11:30

Partner Led Technology in El Salvador and Nicaragua
Limited Capacity seats available

In 2014 SCIAF were awarded a Big Lottery Fund (BLF) for a project in El Salvador and Nicaragua to improve food security and income of vulnerable rural people through sustainable food production. SCIAF works exclusively through partnership and the BLF grant is implemented by SCIAF through 5 local partners, 3 in El Sal and 2 in Nicaragua. At the outset SCIAF hired a consultant to assist in a partner led baseline to facilitate participatory design of baseline tools with partners and communities, facilitate data collection by the partners and from the baseline tools, design annual data collection tools. The approach aimed to promote participation and data ownership.
SCIAF together with the implementing partners and the consultant Rodolfo Valdez Morales came up with a system to collect data using both paper and open source software on the partners own phones, all data was entered on to a shared database held on desktops and collated on a private server. The database enabled those involved in the project to access analyzed data and project specific report in real time. Likewise a number of methods were used to train and troubleshoot with partners including workshops, field testing, video tutorials and skype meetings. The system was reviewed by SCIAF and partners and extended to a second project which uses only open source software on partners' phones to collect data. The project is funded by the European Union to promote young rural technicians promote sustainable communities through agro-ecology.

Speakers
avatar for Ciara Commins

Ciara Commins

International Programme Officer and T4D Lead, Scottish Catholic International Aid Fund (SCIAF)
Ciara Commins, has a background in Civil and Environmental engineering and has worked in the NGO sector for a number of years as Programme Officer and lead on T4D pilots and projects for Caritas agencies.


Thursday May 19, 2016 11:30 - 12:15
Giraffe 200

12:15

Audio Knowledge for Remote Communities
Limited Capacity seats available

Literacy Bridge developed the Talking Book as a low-cost, simple, and durable audio device to provide on-demand access to locally relevant knowledge across many sectors and SDGs. The Talking Book also collects user feedback, usage statistics, and interactive quiz results.

We will demonstrate the functionality of the battery-powered Talking Book and explain how local users designed it to address challenges found in the most underserved rural communities, such as illiteracy, numerous dialects, unreliable electricity and networks, and unequal access to technology for marginalized groups including women and girls.

We will discuss some of the early deployment problems and how the product became packaged as part of a service that includes behavior change communication design, content strategy, audio production, and monitoring, learning, and evaluation.

We will demonstrate new features in 2016 such as the cloud-based dashboard presenting key performance indications and data exploration so partners can immediately and transparently access the state of deployment and user interaction-- even those in remote communities with networks.

Finally, we will share newly developed best practices for partnerships. Literacy Bridge is now shifting from bilateral to multilateral partnerships, so that partners like UNICEF can develop maternal & child health content that is deployed alongside farming instruction for women farmer's in CARE International's Village Savings and Loan Associations.

Speakers
avatar for Cliff Schmidt

Cliff Schmidt

Founder & Executive Director, Literacy Bridge
Cliff founded Literacy Bridge in 2007 to make agriculture and health knowledge accessible to people without literacy skills in remote rural areas. He created an audio-based device called the "Talking Book", which led to a fellowship award presented by Bill Gates and a Clinton Global... Read More →



Thursday May 19, 2016 12:15 - 13:00
Giraffe 201

12:15

Harnessing Mobile Phones for Sustainable Development of Smallholder Agriculture
Limited Capacity full

Mobile technologies facilitate networks of farmers and agribusiness, so that they can support each other. But the critical question is 'How best can this be done?' The initiative of using mobile technologies in agriculture is in its infancy stage in the world at large while in some developing countries it is already in use. The bulk of small scale farming systems in the developing world are very much limited in production and therefore inherently less profitable than they should be. The chief contributor to this is the far cry information and the necessary farming skills gap that hinder the embracing of available technologies and management practices According to (Silva, 2008) information asymmetry is a significant contributor to overall transaction costs. ICT is starting to influence the way agriculture is practised in the world (Maumbe, 2013.) For instance the bulk of the Zimbabwean population (67%) (Agency, 2012) live in the rural areas and heavily depends on farming activities for a living. In actual fact there is empirical evidence of urban to rural migration in Zimbabwe as confirmed by the census of 2012 (ibid). The smallholder farmers largely depend on agricultural activities for food and income for all their requirements which include paying school fees for children, buying farming implements for next season and housekeeping requirements. These smallholder farmers labor on their land but what is happening is that there are middlemen who are benefitting from these farmers' work as they prey on farmers poverty and bring second hand clothing and groceries to small holder farmers and take away the hard-earned farmers' produce as observed by this researcher in one area. There is need for boosting the performance of these Smallholder farmers as this result in the uplifting of the overall level of standards of living of Smallholder farmers and the development of the economy at large. This segment provides a source of living to 70+ percent of the Zimbabwean population and up to a third of the country's labor force is employed in the agricultural sector. The presenter will talk on ways of addressing the problems bedevilling Smallholder farmers in developing countries.

Speakers
avatar for Samuel Musungwini

Samuel Musungwini

Lecturer, MIDLANDS STATE UNIVERSITY AND UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH AFRICA
Samuel Musungwini was born in Shurugwi district in The Midlands Province in Zimbabwe. Samuel Musungwini is a lecturer at Midlands State University in Zimbabwe. He is a holder of a BSc Hons Information Systems, MSc Information Systems Management and a Post Graduate Diploma in Tertiary... Read More →



Thursday May 19, 2016 12:15 - 13:00
Giraffe 200

14:00

Audio Knowledge for Remote Communities
Limited Capacity seats available

Literacy Bridge developed the Talking Book as a low-cost, simple, and durable audio device to provide on-demand access to locally relevant knowledge across many sectors and SDGs. The Talking Book also collects user feedback, usage statistics, and interactive quiz results.

We will demonstrate the functionality of the battery-powered Talking Book and explain how local users designed it to address challenges found in the most underserved rural communities, such as illiteracy, numerous dialects, unreliable electricity and networks, and unequal access to technology for marginalized groups including women and girls.

We will discuss some of the early deployment problems and how the product became packaged as part of a service that includes behavior change communication design, content strategy, audio production, and monitoring, learning, and evaluation.

We will demonstrate new features in 2016 such as the cloud-based dashboard presenting key performance indications and data exploration so partners can immediately and transparently access the state of deployment and user interaction-- even those in remote communities with networks.

Finally, we will share newly developed best practices for partnerships. Literacy Bridge is now shifting from bilateral to multilateral partnerships, so that partners like UNICEF can develop maternal & child health content that is deployed alongside farming instruction for women farmer's in CARE International's Village Savings and Loan Associations.

Speakers
avatar for Cliff Schmidt

Cliff Schmidt

Founder & Executive Director, Literacy Bridge
Cliff founded Literacy Bridge in 2007 to make agriculture and health knowledge accessible to people without literacy skills in remote rural areas. He created an audio-based device called the "Talking Book", which led to a fellowship award presented by Bill Gates and a Clinton Global... Read More →



Thursday May 19, 2016 14:00 - 14:45
Giraffe 201

14:00

Mobile Agriculture Landscape and Opportunities
Limited Capacity seats available

2.3 billion people depend on agriculture for their livelihoods. Mobile is uniquely positioned to deliver the critical agricultural information quickly and affordable financing that rural smallholder farmers need, enabling them to make better informed decisions and investments that boost their productivity and profit. The GSMA mAgri Programme forges partnerships between mobile operators, technology providers and agricultural organisations. Our mission is to advance the productivity and profitability of smallholder farmers and the agricultural industry at large through scalable and commercial mobile services.  This presentation will introduce the programme and share insights on the current state of the industry, our learnings from supporting operators to implement services in the current landscape and opportunities moving forward.

Speakers
avatar for Matthew Strickland

Matthew Strickland

mAgri Market Engagement Manager, GSMA
Matthew is a Market Engagement Manager for the GSMA mAgri programme based in London, providing consultancy support to grantees in Africa, supporting the implementation of their mAgri product initiatives. Previously, Matthew lived in Malawi and Tanzania working with smallholder... Read More →


Thursday May 19, 2016 14:00 - 14:45
Giraffe 258

14:00

Sugarcane Cultivation for Flood Resilience
Limited Capacity seats available

MERCY CORPS Nepal is implementing program "Managing Risk through Economic Development (MRED)" in far west region of Nepal focusing on sugarcane plantation along the river banks to reduce the impact of flood while building resilience and providing economic opportunity in previously floodplain areas.
Together with existing database of Sugar mill, MC was involved in collection of primary data for existing sugarcane cultivation in two districts. This was an effort to support the stakeholders understand and realize the potential of low cost innovative technological solutions for the collection of data on existing sugarcane cultivation. Details of sugarcane cultivated were taken as per discussion with multiple stakeholders.
The technology employed is itself simple and replicable. Open data collection platforms easily accessible through the android based mobile devices were used for the process of mapping of sugarcane cultivated plots. These accessed both online or offline. It collects details of sugarcane cultivated and the farmers. The GPS data helps monitor surveyed plots and distance from different stakeholders.
Public, private and civil participation has been promoted throughout the project. Open sharing of private data by sugar mill indicating support for the project and positive expectation of increasing benefit to the sugarcane industry. This data will help government sector be more aware of the status of sugarcane cultivation and plan strategize for the promotion of the sugarcane sector. The mapping of existing and potential areas along the river banks for sugarcane cultivation explores the growth of sugarcane sector linking increase in livelihood of vulnerable population along the river banks.

Speakers
avatar for Dinee Tamang

Dinee Tamang

Research Advisor, Mercy Corps
Dinee Tamang is a Research Advisor working in Mercy Corps Nepal. | He has more than three years of experience in working with GIS in the field of NRM, DRM and Urban Planning.



Thursday May 19, 2016 14:00 - 14:45
Giraffe 200

14:45

Business Planning Application Solution for e-Krishok
Limited Capacity seats available

e-Krishok Business Planning Solution is an application developed to help farmers develop business plans for their farming practices. The application has two major components, (i) business planning canvass and (ii) profitability calculator. The business planning canvass helps a farmer to analyze his or her required inputs, revenue streams, potential partners, customers etc which are required to develop a business plan. Whereas, using the second component users can calculate their profitability, both estimated and actual and also compare among multiple crops, so that they can find out which crop is more profitable. They can use the accounts for their future farm planning. The idea behind this solution is to help farmers keep accounts and make proper business plans so that they can practice demand driven farming and increase their profits. This application has been developed based field experiences through implementation of Farmbook in Bangladesh. It has been customized to match specifics of smaller farmers and keeping in mind the skills f farmers in developing countries. The application can be used in any Android based platform. The business planning can also be done with the help of an agent, so that the agent can assist farmers in his or her area.

Speakers
avatar for Shahid Akbar

Shahid Akbar

Chief Executive Officer (CEO), Bangladesh Institute of ICT in Development (BIID)
Md Shahid Uddin Akbar is the Chief Executive Officer (CEO) at Bangladesh Institute of ICT in Development (BIID), an inclusive business initiative to promote the use of ICT as a tool for development. Fostering ICT integration in development initiatives and mainstreaming ICT4D in... Read More →


Thursday May 19, 2016 14:45 - 15:30
Giraffe 201

14:45

Mobile Agriculture Landscape and Opportunities
Limited Capacity seats available

2.3 billion people depend on agriculture for their livelihoods. Mobile is uniquely positioned to deliver the critical agricultural information quickly and affordable financing that rural smallholder farmers need, enabling them to make better informed decisions and investments that boost their productivity and profit. The GSMA mAgri Programme forges partnerships between mobile operators, technology providers and agricultural organisations. Our mission is to advance the productivity and profitability of smallholder farmers and the agricultural industry at large through scalable and commercial mobile services.  This presentation will introduce the programme and share insights on the current state of the industry, our learnings from supporting operators to implement services in the current landscape and opportunities moving forward.

Speakers
avatar for Matthew Strickland

Matthew Strickland

mAgri Market Engagement Manager, GSMA
Matthew is a Market Engagement Manager for the GSMA mAgri programme based in London, providing consultancy support to grantees in Africa, supporting the implementation of their mAgri product initiatives. Previously, Matthew lived in Malawi and Tanzania working with smallholder... Read More →



Thursday May 19, 2016 14:45 - 15:30
Giraffe 258

14:45

Sugarcane Cultivation for Flood Resilience
Limited Capacity seats available

MERCY CORPS Nepal is implementing program "Managing Risk through Economic Development (MRED)" in far west region of Nepal focusing on sugarcane plantation along the river banks to reduce the impact of flood while building resilience and providing economic opportunity in previously floodplain areas.
Together with existing database of Sugar mill, MC was involved in collection of primary data for existing sugarcane cultivation in two districts. This was an effort to support the stakeholders understand and realize the potential of low cost innovative technological solutions for the collection of data on existing sugarcane cultivation. Details of sugarcane cultivated were taken as per discussion with multiple stakeholders.
The technology employed is itself simple and replicable. Open data collection platforms easily accessible through the android based mobile devices were used for the process of mapping of sugarcane cultivated plots. These accessed both online or offline. It collects details of sugarcane cultivated and the farmers. The GPS data helps monitor surveyed plots and distance from different stakeholders.
Public, private and civil participation has been promoted throughout the project. Open sharing of private data by sugar mill indicating support for the project and positive expectation of increasing benefit to the sugarcane industry. This data will help government sector be more aware of the status of sugarcane cultivation and plan strategize for the promotion of the sugarcane sector. The mapping of existing and potential areas along the river banks for sugarcane cultivation explores the growth of sugarcane sector linking increase in livelihood of vulnerable population along the river banks.

Speakers
avatar for Dinee Tamang

Dinee Tamang

Research Advisor, Mercy Corps
Dinee Tamang is a Research Advisor working in Mercy Corps Nepal. | He has more than three years of experience in working with GIS in the field of NRM, DRM and Urban Planning.



Thursday May 19, 2016 14:45 - 15:30
Giraffe 200