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The annual ICT4D Conferences have proven to be an invaluable opportunity for NGOs, private sector organizations, universities, governmental agencies and foundations to share their experience in using ICT to increase the impact of development programs and to learn from each other.  In 2016, 750 individuals from 76 countries and 320 private sector and public sector and civil society explored the ways to harness the full power of digital solutions to achieve the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals.  Our thanks to Accenture, Catholic Relief Services, Esri, Hewlett Packard Enterprise, iMerit Technology Services, Inmarsat, IS Solutions, Making All Voices Count, Mercy Corps, Microsoft, NetHope, Oxfam, Pandexio, Qualcom Wireless Reach, RTI International, SimbaNet and World Vision for making that possible.

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Monday, May 16
 

08:00

Welcome and Introduction to SDG ICT Playbook
The Sustainable Development Goals, represent a commitment on the part of leaders around the world to ending poverty in all its forms. As such they recognize that a holistic approach is needed to step up to the social, environmental and economic challenges of creating a world in which all people live in dignity and peace and have the opportunity and natural resources to achieve their full human potential for generations to come. No one doubts the difficulty of meeting this commitment– particularly when we are faced with new challenges – environmental degradation and climate change, expanding populations, the spread of new diseases and increasing numbers of conflicts – this at a time where millions of people still do not have access to basic services and continue to live in poverty and hunger.

It will take the combined talent and efforts of organizations from all walks of life to find new ways of working and interacting that help us address complex development issues. Information and Communication Technology (ICT) are key enabler of these changes – changes that not only improve the efficiency and impact of development work – but create sustainable approaches to providing the information and services that empower communities, families, and individuals to live healthy and prosperous lives. The SDG ICT Playbook is a resource that is designed to help our organizations leverage technology in the work they undertake to address the SDGs. The presentations and discussions during the course of the ICT4D conference build on many of the themes laid out in the Playbook and aim to move the community forward in leveraging the full potential of ICT in their work.

Speakers
avatar for Sean Callahan

Sean Callahan

Chief Operating Officer, Catholic Relief Services
As Chief Operating Officer of CRS, Sean Callahan provides executive leadership to the Overseas Operations, US Operations, and Human Resources divisions. His role is to enhance performance, stimulate innovation, and position the Agency for the future. In 2015, Sean was elected 1st Vice President of Caritas Internationalis, a confederation of 165 Catholic relief, development and social service organizations operating in over 200 countries and... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 08:00 - 08:30
Jambo Conference Centre

08:30

The Role of ICTs in Enabling the Economic, Environmental and Social Changes Needed to Achieve the SDGs
Speakers
avatar for Dr. Mukhisa Kituyi

Dr. Mukhisa Kituyi

Secretary-General, United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD)
Dr. Mukhisa Kituyi, of Kenya, who became UNCTAD's seventh Secretary-General on 1 September 2013, has an extensive background as an elected official, an academic, and a holder of high government office. He also has wide-ranging experience in trade negotiations, and in African and broader international economics and diplomacy.He was born in Bungoma District, western Kenya, in 1956. He studied political science and international relations at the... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 08:30 - 09:05
Jambo Conference Centre

09:05

The Role of ICT in Supporting Kenya's Strategy for Achieving the SDGs
Speakers
avatar for Joseph Mucheru

Joseph Mucheru

MBS (Moran of Burning Spear), Cabinet Secretary, Ministry of Information, Communication & Technology, Kenya Government
Joseph Mucheru, MBS, is the current Cabinet Secretary in the Ministry of Information, Communiations and Technology of the Government of the Republic of Kenya.


Monday May 16, 2016 09:05 - 09:45
Jambo Conference Centre

09:45

Challenge: Empowering Communities to Report and Track Progress

The world has just made its biggest ever promise to itself. Our leaders have agreed to 17 Global Goals that would mean a better life for all of us. They would virtually end extreme poverty, fight inequality and injustice, and tackle climate change in the next 15 years. It’s one of the most incredible to-do lists ever written – but now we need to turn words into action. You, participants in this conference have the power to make sure our leaders keep these world-changing promises. In this session ONE will outline the challenge for the week.  If we, from different sectors, organizations and walks of life come together we can put in place a system that allows people all over the world, in every community facing extreme poverty, to report and track progress against the SDGs.  We can be sure that we leverage the potential of ICT to give those living in extreme poverty a voice and tools to hold also of us all accountable for delivering against the promises embodied in the 17 Global Goals.

As the conference unfolds this week, take the opportunity to work with your colleagues on the answering this challenge and come back and tell us at the end of the week what approaches you recommend and what commitments you can make.  People living in extreme poverty have been waiting for their leaders to answer questions regarding access to modern energy, clean water, education, health services, decent work and the things needed to live safe and health lives and have the opportunity to reach their full potential.  Let’s not make them wait any longer. 


Speakers
avatar for Mwambu Wanendeya

Mwambu Wanendeya

Africa Executive Director, ONE
Mwambu Wanendeya serves as ONE’s Africa Executive Director. Prior to joining ONE he had leadership positions in finance and telecommunications for ten years leading global and regional teams responsible for brand, marketing, communications and corporate social responsibility for listed global companies. In that capacity he worked on award winning global campaigns for major international music events such as the Nelson Mandela’s 90 and 91st... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 09:45 - 10:15
Jambo Conference Centre

10:15

10:15

Exhibits
Exhibitors
avatar for Akros

Akros

Data for the Community, By the Community: Feedback Loops for Sanitation, Education and Malaria Control | Mobile data collection tools have revolutionized data timeliness, breadth, and quality in less developed countries. But what happens to those data after they are aggregated and analyzed? In cooperation with government ministries and traditional leaders in Zambia, Akros works to ensure routine surveillance data empower local decision-makers... Read More →
avatar for CABI

CABI

Plantwise: Sharing Plant Health | The Plantwise exhibit will demonstrate the Plantwise ICT innovations that Dr Washington Otieno will present in his breakout session.  Booth visitors will be able to interact with and explore the Plantwise Plant Doctor Simulator App and the Plantwise Factsheet Library App using Android tablets, On May 16 and 17, visitors will be able to see live demos of Plantwise e-plant clinics. This will allow... Read More →
avatar for Kimetrica

Kimetrica

Kimetrica | Our exhibit will focus on Kimetrica's Project Monitoring & Evaluation software -(ki-projects). Ki-projects is a web based software that combines aspects of results based project management with the full set of M&E functions. We will also be showing our offline data collection tool that can be used on android tablets to collect data in the field and sync back to the main system. You can find more details on the software... Read More →
avatar for Microsoft

Microsoft

Microsoft and NetHope | Through Microsoft's generous support, NetHope is pleased to join with Microsoft Philanthropies in the exhibit hall at the ICT4D Conference. In our booth, Microsoft will explain their ICT4D engagements ranging from the Public Cloud for Public Good offers by MS Philanthropies to the locally designed and commercially successful 4Africa Program. A host of other relevant and innovative technologies will be on display... Read More →
avatar for NetHope

NetHope

Microsoft and NetHope | Through Microsoft's generous support, NetHope is pleased to join with Microsoft Philanthropies in the exhibit hall at the ICT4D Conference. In our booth, Microsoft will explain their ICT4D engagements ranging from the Public Cloud for Public Good offers by MS Philanthropies to the locally designed and commercially successful 4Africa Program. A host of other relevant and innovative technologies will be on display... Read More →
avatar for SimbaNET

SimbaNET

Visit this exhibit to learn more about SimbaNET services and the underlying technology that supports them. | | About SimbaNET | SimbaNET Limited is a Regional Licensed Public Data Operator with national and international application licenses specialized in providing voice, video, high speed data and Internet connectivity. It owns an extensive network comprising of submarine and terrestrial optic fiber, the latest broadband WiMAX 4G wireless... Read More →
avatar for VaxTrac

VaxTrac

Building Customized Vaccine Registry Technology  | VaxTrac is a clinic based workflow management tool (currently using android based smartphones or tablets) used by frontline health workers to create and update patient level immunization records that are synchronized to the cloud and aggregated into the national health management information system. Data collected by VaxTrac is available to immunization program managers at every level of... Read More →
avatar for International Procurement Agency (USA), Inc.

International Procurement Agency (USA), Inc.

International Procurement Agency - USA IPA  | The USA IPA exhibit will display our capabilities in planning and implementing ICT solutions for organizations worldwide. Our 6-step approach to supply chain management enables us to offer comprehensive proposals that meet the needs of various programs. During the planning phase we consider the unique requirements of each project, from imaging and configuration to distribution at each field... Read More →
avatar for Christian Aid

Christian Aid

ICT for Enhanced Accountability | ICT solutions that are having significant impact on development. This booth will showcase health projects working with the m-Health platform and other digital data gathering and analysis tools. | | About Christian Aid | Christian Aid is an international development organisation registered in the UK (charity # 1105851) and working globally for profound change that eradicates the causes of poverty... Read More →
avatar for Akvo and CRS

Akvo and CRS

Efficient Use of Technology in Data Management for Evidence Based Decision Making and Transparency Akvo and Catholic Relief Services (CRS) will show case use of mobile phone based data collection tools including: Akvo Flow, a multi-language tool for collecting, collating and presenting diverse data types including geographically referenced data using a simple Android smartphone application and an online dashboard, Akvo Caddisfly, a... Read More →
avatar for University of Notre Dame

University of Notre Dame

Keough School of Global Affairs, University of Notre Dame | Within the new Keough School of Global Affairs are two integral units:the Kellogg Institute's Ford Family Program in Human Development working in East Africa to Investigate the interactions between effective community engagement and socioeconomic development to expand opportunities for people to flourish with dignity; and the Notre Dame Initiative for Global Development, which uses... Read More →
avatar for Hewlett Packard Enterprise

Hewlett Packard Enterprise

The Living Progress Challenge | Building on a 75 year history of citizenship, Hewlett Packard Enterprise is taking an innovative crowdsourcing approach to uncover pioneering digital solutions for millions of people disadvantaged by the digital divide. The Living Progress Challenge invited the global community to answer the question: What software applications and digital services would you create to improve lives? Visit our booth to see how it... Read More →
avatar for Helen Keller International

Helen Keller International

Multiple Uses of ICT for Improved Humanitarian Programming | This exhibit will present how ICT, integrated in every step of program management, has contributed to improving the design, the reach, the performance and the monitoring of humanitarian programs and health system functions in HKI 13 target countries in Sub Saharan Africa   | | HKI has developed expertise in ICT and has integrated it in its daily management practices all over the... Read More →
avatar for RTI International

RTI International

Power in Numbers: Harnessing Data to Revolutionize Development | Actionable insights and evidence that can be gained from data have the power to transform how international development is done. RTI International has the development expertise and data science capabilities needed to help governments, international organizations, and the private sector harness this "data revolution for development" and help design and implement programs that are... Read More →
avatar for Danoffice IT

Danoffice IT

Changing the World through Technology | The Danoffice IT exhibit will focus on Mobility and Mobile management. Danoffiice IT will showcase the latest trends and technologies with IT, Biometrics, Data Capture and Unmanned Aerial Systems. | | About Danoffice IT | At Danoffice IT we have more than 20 of experience of working within the humanitarian We are an experienced and dynamic group of passionate people, devoted in our field. We are proud... Read More →
avatar for sQuid Kenya

sQuid Kenya

Using Technology to Improve Education & Learning Outcomes | We wish to display our innovative payments and data technology that is currently being used in a large-scale intervention in Kenya that supports 150,000 primary schoolchildren, in 205 schools. The programme uses technology to improve education and learning outcomes by delivering: | Digital attendance monitoring using a NFC-enabled tablet and contactless smart card to capture... Read More →
avatar for Catholic Relief Services

Catholic Relief Services

CRS - ICT4D Innovation - eValuate and Farmbook eValuate is CRS' digital platform for collecting, managing and analyzing data on monitoring, evaluation, accountability and learning (MEAL). The platform uses ICT4D tools (including mobile devices, electronic data collection and integrated reporting) to achieve better MEAL. By using standardized yet flexible ICT4D tools, e-Valuate offers many advantages for MEAL: Easier and more accurate data... Read More →
avatar for Zerion Software, Inc.

Zerion Software, Inc.

3 Stages of Digital M&E | Learn how Zerion Software supports the 3 stages of Digital M&E and what it takes to implement digital M&E in your project to deliver impact. | | About Zerion Software | Creators of the iFormBuilder mobile platform, Zerion's newly formed Impact Solutions team provides expertise in impact driven data collection, management, analytics and improved performance. |
avatar for Motorola Solutions

Motorola Solutions

Motorola Solutions | This exhibit will showcase the following devices: | • Body work Cameras – LTE User Devices- Two way Radios | • Systems and Networks: LTE – Mototrbo Systems – Dispatch | | It will feature two-way radio applications covering the spectrum of mission critical and professional needs with solutions for network and device management, strict information assurance policies and advanced voice and... Read More →
avatar for Ona Systems

Ona Systems

Ona Data Platform | Ona (www.ona.io) is a simple, yet powerful data collection, management and analysis platform that makes it easy for everyone, from individuals to large, multi-national NGOs,to collect, manage, analyse and securely share their real-time data. | | Users can sign up for a free account and start collecting data within minutes. Surveys are authored in Excel (or any other spreadsheet program) using XLS Form syntax, an... Read More →
avatar for Voltaic Systems

Voltaic Systems

Portable Solar Power and Lighting | This exhibit will showcase a range of solar chargers designed to power smartphones, tablets, laptops, cameras and LED lighting. | | About Voltaic Systems | Voltaic Systems is a portable power company based in Brooklyn, New York. A drained phone in the middle of Spain led our founder to design the first solar backpack. We now provide a range of portable power and lighting solutions for NGOs, institutions, and... Read More →
avatar for One Mobile Projector per Trainer

One Mobile Projector per Trainer

One Mobile Projector per Trainer (OMPT) empowers organizations in developing countries to use video and cordless projectors to accelerate learning and behavior change. Their two-pronged approach delivers video production training and projection equipment to countries around the world. OMPT's equipment kits are specifically designed to be used in areas without electricity. The intervention is discipline agnostic and is being applied to... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 10:15 - 18:00
Jambo Conference Centre Exhibit Hall

10:15

Map Gallery
The Map Gallery provides illustrations of how maps can be used to advance the mission of organizations.

Mappers
CH

Crime Hot Spot Map for the City of Lahore

Information Technology University
Hotspot map identifies crime pockets of the city of Lahore. The maps are helping police optimize their patrolling plans.
avatar for Dadaab Camp Growth

Dadaab Camp Growth

Esri
The map will display how the extent of the Dadaab Camps have grown over time based on information extracted from satellite images using remote sensing. Some statistics will also be indicated such as the demographics of the displaced persons, the humanitarian/relief organizations operating within the camps, and comparisons with other internationally known refugee camps. It relies on data from UNHCR, imagery from LANDSAT and ASTER, and ENVI and... Read More →
DE

Digital Empowerment Program

Mahatma Gandhi Institute For Rural Industrialization
This map illustrates effective use of social media when combined with an ICT package for the rural sector. It helps build awareness of the Rural Digital Empowerment Program and how it allows data sharing and networking among similar stakeholders.
DO

Dissemination of Rumors in the Tana Delta

Sentinel Project
The map shows how rumours spread in Tana Delta over time and to which villages and in what order. It illustates how misinformation flows and aids in the implementation of campaigns to counter misinformation.
avatar for Ecological Land Unit Map

Ecological Land Unit Map

US Geological Survey & Esri
In 2014, the US Geological Survey (USGS) and Esri announced the publication of the most detailed global ecological land units (ELUs) map in the world. The ELUs are terrestrial ecosystems defined and modeled as unique combinations of bioclimate, landform, geology, and land cover. The first goal is to provide, for the first time, a web-based, GIS-ready, global ecophysiographic data product for land managers, scientists, conservationists... Read More →
avatar for Ethiopian Catholic Schools and Health Institutions

Ethiopian Catholic Schools and Health Institutions

Catholic Relief Services
This map depicts, the location of catholic institutions within Ethiopia by districts, proximity from major towns and where they overlap.
avatar for Ethiopian Social Infrastructure Mapping

Ethiopian Social Infrastructure Mapping

Catholic Relief Services
This map shows the location, distribution and type of social infrastructures built under the auspices of a Development Food Aid Program. It helps business developers to see where CRS's stakeholders are located and to inform project donors and implementers of progress in serving them. It improves decision making by the donors, staff and partners.
avatar for Find the malaria, Save a Life: How mSpray and GIS Improve Malaria Prevention

Find the malaria, Save a Life: How mSpray and GIS Improve Malaria Prevention

Akros
mSpray is a suite of mapping tools that puts IRS campaigns into efficiency overdrive. After enumerating structures from satellite imagery and QGIS, we send Spray teams into the field with cellular-enabled tablets, showing them where they are—and where the next house is they need to spray. When the team’s tablet is within 50m of a house, they can “tag” the structure as sprayed. The field teams (and their managers at... Read More →
FN

Flight Network Map for Pakistan

Information Technology University
This flight network map marks frequency of airplanes passing through different areas of Pakistan. The flight frequency map of Pakistan can help in the creation of an airborne networking platform to provide internet in the infrastructure challenged regions of Pakistan and other developing nations. Using this spatial data of airplanes we proposed a novel airborne networking approach to provide internet (beam down) to underprivileged communities... Read More →
avatar for ITAS Project Coverage

ITAS Project Coverage

International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA)
The purpose of this map is to showcase the villages where anyone can easily find the smallholders farmers group who are already involved in the ITAS network. The intent of this map is to help agricultural research institutions and ICT4Ag application builders to have clear information of where solutions are being provided to improve food security.
avatar for Kibera Schools

Kibera Schools

Map Kibera/ GroundTruth Initiative
The Kibera Schools Map was produced under ths auspices of the Open Schools Kenya Project, one in which residents map the schools in their neighborhood. This is the fisrt time all informal schools in Kibera were mapped alongside government schools.
avatar for Kibera Security Map

Kibera Security Map

Map Kibera/ GroundTruth Initiative
This map highlights insecure spots in Kibera and was used to support the Kenyan elections, as well as bringing attention to the need for improved general security measures such as street lights. It is based on input from community members as described. Since the map was produced, a number of street lights have been added.
avatar for Land Use Planning Map of a Rwandan Cell

Land Use Planning Map of a Rwandan Cell

Esri
This land use planning map of a Rwandan cell shows the cadastral plan, schools, hospitals and infrastructure on a nicely designed base map. 2000+ of these maps were printed and distributed to their respective cells to inform the local administrators and the population (who do not have access to internet and the National Land Use Planning Portal) on the development guidelines in place for their area. | | The maps were presented and explained at... Read More →
avatar for Map of Flood Level in Palo, Leyte Philippines

Map of Flood Level in Palo, Leyte Philippines

Catholic Relief Services
These are simple maps that were analyzed based on each household's interview regarding their flood level and water table. Each household were asked regarding where they want to construct their latrines in which questions regarding water table and flood level of the area were asked as well. With the GPS points collected, we used the interpolation analysis, to analyze spatially distributed GPS points and check their correlation with their nearest... Read More →
avatar for Map of Kibera, Various Points of Interest

Map of Kibera, Various Points of Interest

Map Kibera/ GroundTruth Initiative
This map contains data collected in OpenStreetMap (www.openstreetmap.org) by the Map Kibera team in areas such as toilets, water points, schools, shops, and many more. The information is current.
avatar for Map of Water Table Data in Palo, Leyte Philippines

Map of Water Table Data in Palo, Leyte Philippines

Catholic Relief Services
These are simple maps that were analyzed based on each household's interview regarding their flood level and water table. Each household were asked regarding where they want to construct their latrines in which questions regarding water table and flood level of the area were asked as well. With the GPS points collected, we used the interpolation analysis, to analyze spatially distributed GPS points and check their correlation with their nearest... Read More →
avatar for Monitoring Water Points in Ethiopia

Monitoring Water Points in Ethiopia

Akvo
This interactive map displays water point information collected with Akvo Flow in Ethiopia. (Akvo Flow is a digital data collection tool for Android phones, which captures the GPS data needed to map survey areas.) | | This particular map will display the results of a monitoring water point mapping program funded in Ethiopia funded by UNICEF (with World Vision and Oxfam as implementing partners). Water point data is collected in the field on... Read More →
avatar for Nepal Project Operations

Nepal Project Operations

Mercy Corps
This map identifies those areas of Nepal that are and are not serviced by Mercy Corps Projects. | | Mercy Corps Nepal (MCN): VDC / Municipality Coverage as of 2015 | Mercy Corps Nepal's Country Facts Portal Mercy Corps Nepal's Website
avatar for Northern Tanzania Rangelands Use

Northern Tanzania Rangelands Use

Honeyguide Foundation
This land use change detection map illustrates the change in northern Tanzania land use from untouched protected areas to ever-expanding settlements and farmlands. It informs rangelands and land use decisions, especially protection.
avatar for Project Performance Monitoring in Madagascar

Project Performance Monitoring in Madagascar

Catholic Relief Services
This map represents Fararano project performance in terms of output and outcomes such as growth monitoring (thematic map z-score), groups registered (thematics map/group type) and infrastructures localisations managed during the food for asset program. The map aids in decision making and project management by making activities implementation more relevant and focused.
avatar for Realtime Monitoring of School Latrine Construction in Ghana

Realtime Monitoring of School Latrine Construction in Ghana

Catholic Relief Services
This map shows the location of construction and contacts of community members involved in the construction of school latrines. It allows real-time monitoring of the construction process.
avatar for Recommendation Domains for Crop Variety Scaling in Tanzania

Recommendation Domains for Crop Variety Scaling in Tanzania

International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA)
This map identifies sustainable recommendation domains (SRDs) for scaling crop varieties and related agronomic practices in Tanzania. The map was generated from GIS and remote sensing data representing biophysical and socio-economic environments. Areas with homogenous biophysical and socio-economic characteristcs are identified. The critical ecosystems such as nature reserves and wetlands are masked to ensure that scaling of agricultural... Read More →
avatar for Satellite Assisted Pastoral Resource Management (SAPARM)

Satellite Assisted Pastoral Resource Management (SAPARM)

Project Concern International (PCI)
This map is an example of those used by pastoralist communities of over 1 million people in Ethiopia and Tanzania to inform their migration decision-making. Every year during the dry seasons, pastoralists migrate in search of adequate pasture for their livestock. However, climate change and repeated droughts are making traditional methods of migration decision making (indigenous knowledge, scouts, and dagu) increasingly unreliable, resulting in... Read More →
avatar for Spatial Distribution of Malawi Community Households in Relation to Weather-related Challenges

Spatial Distribution of Malawi Community Households in Relation to Weather-related Challenges

Catholic Relief Services
This map provides a display of spatial distribution of community households for a farm-inputs project in relation to exposure to weather-related challenges.The map was used to ensure local partner's objectivity in the selection of beneficiaries against the backdrop of vulnerability to changing weather patterns.The map allowed partner staff to review beneficiary identification criteria, provided a basis for weaning and identifying new... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 10:15 - 18:00
Jambo Conference Centre Exhibit Hall

10:45

Farmerline: Impact Through Information Value
Limited Capacity full

Farmerline, a social enterprise dedicated to improving the livelihood of farmers, has found strength in empowering farmers with information products providing ROI for the farmers. These empowered farmers become less risky as an investment themselves.

Farmerline’s climate-smart agronomic information product delivers good agricultural practices, weather reports, and market information systems for nine crops to farmers in order to increase their profits and make farming practices more sustainable. Created in partnership with leading socially minded meteorological technology companies and agricultural experts, the products are currently implemented in seven local Ghanaian languages. Fish farmers in Ghana saw almost 50% increase in profits over one season of utilizing these information products. Farmerline closes the information gap between farmers and the world market, while farmers pay as little as $0.09/week.

Farmerline also has a powerful android app-based data collection tool that covers many aspects of farmer support from basic farmer data collection to developing relationships with trading partners, through certification procedures, supply chain management, cataloguing and inventory. This app works with the content services to provide support to every level of farming infrastructure across West Africa.

By discussing this technology, these experiences, and asking what parts of the model are transferrable, we can approach what needs to be reimagined across sectors.



Speakers
avatar for Sessie Burns

Sessie Burns

Business Development Associate, Farmerline
Sessie is a math nerd turned policy professional with a passion for high-impact development work, data-driven interventions, and really good coffee. As a student of policy, she narrowed her international interest to focus on cross-sector development solutions, particularly in post-colonial states in Southeast Asia. Sessie supports farmers in West Africa at Farmerline, where she manages relationships between the public, private, and nonprofit... Read More →



Monday May 16, 2016 10:45 - 11:30
Giraffe 255

10:45

Farmforce
Limited Capacity filling up

Farmforce is a web and mobile platform built for use by large scale contract farming schemes composed of small holder farmers. The system allows these schemes to be managed with real time digital data. The system allows company agronomists & production managers to control which inputs growers apply to their fields, ensuring that that approved chemicals are used and that the correct maximum dose, pre-harvest intervals, and maximum number of applications per season are observed. The system provides support for data collection for international safety and sustainability standards such as Global GAP. Farmforce has a loan management module which supports cash and input loans calculated based on the size of farmer's fields. The Farmforce mobile application has a secure harvest purchasing module (including loan repayments) which is integrated with mobile weighing scales and a bluetooth printer for use at collection centers to improve transparency. The system captures data while online or offline enabling technical assistants capture data in very remote areas. The system provides detailed weekly production forecasts. The system supports low end android mobile phones like Samsung Galaxy Pocket which are cheap ($110), portable and easy to use.

Speakers
FK

Faith Kamenchu

Project Manager, Farmforce
Faith Kamenchu is a qualified Project Manager and Business Systems Analyst with over 13 years of experience in Africa with IT, agronomy, and farm management and packhouse management systems. Faith has led teams working in agriculture, horticulture and floriculture. She has worked with systems for farm management (large farms and small holders), traceability, quality management, produce management, payroll and weight management. These systems have... Read More →



Monday May 16, 2016 10:45 - 11:30
Giraffe 254

10:45

Strengthening Digital Solutions for Agriculture: User-Centered Design and Testing Processes
Limited Capacity filling up

In the agriculture sector, mobile solutions for farmers have failed for three main reasons: First, they're not designed with end-user input. Second, they fail to integrate advisory and financial services-providing only one or the other. Finally, they lack a range of access options-either excluding low-end device users or smartphone owners. A custom bids and offers platform, created by Souktel and Mercy Corps for Southern Africa, is the first solution that offers user-designed advisory and m-commerce services together, with full mobile money integration and multi-channel access (via USSD or app). This session will show how platform was developed from the end user perspective of small-scale farmers and agricultural product buyers. It will also demonstrate how organizations can launch and manage this platform to strengthen their own agriculture/livelihoods projects, and achieve progress toward SDGs #1 (No Poverty), #2 (Zero Hunger), and #8 (Decent Work) as a result.


Speakers
avatar for Michael Moszczynski

Michael Moszczynski

Chief Software Architect, Souktel Digital Solutions
Michael leads Souktel’s custom digital design team, directing user-centered scoping work across Africa—most recently in Zimbabwe and Liberia. He has over a decade of experience in mobile application design, interactive voice response (IVR), and network connectivity integration. His experience in the mobile industry includes working with large companies like VeriSign, where he designed content delivery applications for clients like MTV and... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 10:45 - 11:30
Giraffe 253

10:45

Achieving Economies of Scale with a Common Digital Health Solution in Africa/Asia
Limited Capacity full

For over eight years, World Vision has advanced mHealth as a health and community systems strengthening tool. The World Vision mHealth portfolio has active deployments supporting community health workers (CHWs) and health facility staff in 16 different countries in Africa, South and Southeast Asia.

To support many of these projects, World Vision has invested in the development of a common set of applications built within the mHealth solution, MoTECH Suite. This has been made possible through a partnership with solution providers Dimagi and Grameen Foundation supported by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. The common platform offers an open source software solution tailored to meet the needs of five different World Vision health and nutrition project models or approaches. Using these five global applications as the starting point, the solution application is contextualised in close consultation with Ministry of Health (MOH) counterparts and users at the national and field levels.

World Vision mHealth projects are all working towards transitioning into scale-up phase once consensus and shared commitment to a solution or a package of solutions is reached among key national stakeholders - governments, local mobile network operators (MNOs), and MOH leadership chief among them.

Speakers
avatar for Martha Newsome

Martha Newsome

Vice President, Sustainable Health, World Vision International
Martha Holley Newsome is responsible for World Vision International’s Sustainable Health global programme group, including food, nutrition, HIV&AIDS, and water, sanitation and hygiene. She has a Masters of Public Health from the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health and a BA from Wheaton College in Illinois. She has spent 14 years living in Southern Africa, in Mozambique and South Africa. She recently joined the Scaling Up... Read More →



Monday May 16, 2016 10:45 - 11:30
Giraffe 210

10:45

CreativeMapper and SDG Youth Action Mapper: How Creative Is Integrating Mapping and GIS Tech into Development Work
Limited Capacity seats available

In the development sector it has been standard for enumerators from outside a community to enter that community, extract data and not return any of the information from the data collection. The rapid adoption of mobile devices in developing countries now allows for data collection and analysis to not only be more rapid and more frequent, but to also be more participatory and inclusive. To empower community-based data collection and mapping, Creative has developed the CreativeMapper toolkit. Citizens, particularly youth, have been trained on how to use the toolkit to gather information important their community's development and to make that data easily accessible on a public map.

To support the massive data collection needs of the SDGs, Creative has used its CreativeMapper toolkit to develop the SDG Youth Action Mapper (SDG YAM) model. For SDG YAM, Creative and its partners will be mobilizing and training youth to map opportunities for taking action on the SDGs using their mobile devices. Youth will identify volunteer opportunities that contribute to the realization of the 17 goals. The map of SDG action opportunities will allow other youth to find ways to contribute to the development of their country. The Points of Contact for the opportunities that have been mapped will use CreativeMapper to report regularly on the number of hours youth have volunteered toward the SDG goals and the results of this volunteer time. SDG YAM is changing how development is done by putting youth in charge of identifying opportunities and taking action toward the development of their countries and having their efforts logged and counted toward the realization of development goals. 

Speakers
AK

Ayan Kishore

Senior Associate, Technology for Development, Creative Associates International
Ayan Kishore is a Senior Associate in Creative Associates International's Development Lab. Ayan is an entrepreneur who has successfully built, grown and sold technology companies. He managed the operations of Professional Diversity Network - a publicly traded company where he pioneered a mobile-first career platform for minorities. He chairs the Board of Development Solutions Organization, a volunteer driven consultancy in ICT for international... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 10:45 - 11:30
Giraffe 208

10:45

Use of Electronic Sensors to Improve the Effectiveness of Environmental Health Interventions In Developing Countries
Limited Capacity filling up

Cellar reporting sensors may provide feedback on the sustainability of interventions in developing communities, improving on survey data and infrequent spot checks to assess performance. This presentation will profile several example applications of remotely reporting sensors to assess the proper operation and use of environmental health interventions.

In one recent study in Bangladesh, for instance, our instruments demonstrated more than a 50 percent exaggeration of latrine use compared to household surveys. That result may enable funders and development engineers to rethink how they implement sanitation programs.

In another example, in 2014 we worked on a project to install about 200 sensors in rural water pumps in Rwanda. The purpose was to identify pumps that were broken in order to dispatch repair teams. According to a survey, before the sensors were installed some 44 percent of the area's pumps were broken at any given time, and it took an average of about seven months to get a pump repaired. After the sensors were in place, the repair interval was reduced to just 26 days; consequently, only 9 percent of pumps were broken at a time.

We also evaluated whether awareness of sensors would impact household use of water filters or cookstoves in rural Rwanda. Turns out, there was a dramatic impact: a nearly 63 percent increase in the use of water filters in the first week, which declined slowly over the subsequent four weeks.

Working with CRS in Kenya, our team is presently installing sensors and developing management systems for rural water points.

Speakers
avatar for Katie Fankhauser

Katie Fankhauser

East Africa Program Manager, SweetSense, Inc.
Katie Fankhauser earned a degree in Environmental Studies at the University of Kansas in 2013. Katie is a full time program manager for SweetSense Inc. working in Rwanda, Kenya and Ethiopia, while pursuing a Masters in Public Health within the OHSU / PSU School of Public Health. She has several years of experience working on large-scale international health interventions, specifically managing distributions, fieldwork, and... Read More →
avatar for Styvers Kathuni

Styvers Kathuni

Program Manager/Team Leader – Water, Sanitation and Hygiene, Catholic Relief Services
Styvers Kathuni is the head of the WASH unit at CRS Kenya with over 7 years’ experience in designing and implementing WASH emergency and development projects. He has extensive experience with innovative approaches in water point operation and maintenance. Currently, Styvers also oversees the Kenya RAPID WASH Program, a five year Global Development Alliance funded by USAID, the Swiss Development Corporation, and the private sector, where ICT... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 10:45 - 11:30
Giraffe 211

10:45

Digital Access for Schools at the Edge
Limited Capacity filling up

During 48 2nd grade lessons observed by Uwezo in three districts in Kenya, not a single child asked their teacher a question. Mainstream approaches to teaching and learning have changed very little in the past 50 years in Kenya. A lot of repetition, memorization, note taking, reading and assessments. There is very little space for Kenyan learners to express, let alone explore the things they might be curious about. Curiosity, questions and problem-solving are the spaces within which we see opportunity for real learning. Digital access for students means that the 4 walls of their classroom is not a limit a learner's access to knowledge. 

BRCK Education is thinking holistically about what this digital access looks like in schools. The Kio Kit (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gYXIF8ELdcQ) can turn any classroom into a digital classroom in minutes: it has 40 "ruggedized for Africa" tablets that are wirelessly charged in the box and a BRCK for connectivity and remote educational content syncing and caching. Our focus on user-centric design and hands-on approach to user experience has made the solution popular with students and teachers. We iterate the solution constantly so the time between the bell ringing and learning beginning is always being reduced. And once learning begins, we are seeing improvements in test scores, cognitive thinking, problem solving and social/environmental consciousness. This is largely attributed to the quality of local and international content curated for the students within our "Learn, Play, Grow" platform.

Speakers
avatar for Nivi Sharma

Nivi Sharma

President, BRCK Education
Nivi Sharma is the President of BRCK Education (education.brck.com) and a thought leader in Education Technology for emerging markets. As a social entrepreneur, technophile and community volunteer, she has dedicated her career to education and is passionate about digital access and community initiatives that foster learning through fun. She is also a co-founder of eLimu (e-Limu.org) and a 2014 EA Acumen fellow.


Monday May 16, 2016 10:45 - 11:30
Giraffe 201

10:45

Touchable Earth: Sharing the Kids' Eye View of the World
Limited Capacity seats available


Touchable Earth is the first app where kids teach kids about the world.

Information is presented first hand in over 700 professional portrait photographs and videos of children aged 7-11, or 14-18, living in each place.

Kids learn important facts such as the geography, capital and the meaning of the flag and anthem. They also gain unique insight into the daily lives of kids across the world through following a school day, visiting families in their homes, and seeing the games they play for fun. Famous locations are visible in 360 degree panoramas.

The App won the United Nations AOC Award for innovation in teaching about culture (Vienna 2013) and was named top 25 finalist Education Apps by the United Nations Mobile WSIS (Abu Dhabi).

Content has been created with assistance of iEARN.org, the worlds largest non profit schools network operating in 140 countries. In November 2015 Touchable Earth partnered with UNESCO Dakar office to expand the program to High School aged children with a pilot chapter successfully created in Mali.

Touchable Earth develops a sense of purpose in young people to promote tolerance in their everyday lives.  Values of global citizenship, gender equality and peacebuilding are inherent in the content.  

The app itself is being fully developed and will be available free on iOS, Android and Web (ePub to follow).  Multilanguage translations are included as they become available as are English literacy tools. 



Speakers
avatar for Tudor Clee

Tudor Clee

Founder, Touchable Earth
Tudor Clee is the founder and producer of Touchable Earth - a multi award winning global education App. He is a Barrister and Solicitor of the High Court of New Zealand and fashion designer. Tudor founded Touchable Earth to positively change the context in which children learned about the world. He is passionate about international development particularly around women's rights. An Asia Society Asia 21 Leader, and Summit Series Alumni, Tudor... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 10:45 - 11:30
Giraffe 200

10:45

Using Technology for Program Quality and Accountability
Limited Capacity filling up

Monitoring program quality is critical to achieving positive change. Technology, especially in hard to reach environments, allows for data to be used in real-time to monitor implementation, quickly address quality issues and hold all parties accountable to agreed upon deliverables. The Adolescent Girls Initiative - Kenya, part of a longitudinal, randomized trial, works with adolescent girls 11-14 years old in two marginalized areas in Kenya: the Kibera slum in Nairobi and rural villages in Wajir County, on the border of Somalia. Program implementers use a suite of tech solutions to ensure access to real-time monitoring data, including: 1) use of the Open Data Kit app on android phones to collect attendance data on weekly girls group and community meetings, 2) biometric fingerprint readers linked to an app on an android phone to collect daily school attendance (which is used to calculate eligibility for a cash transfer conditioned on school attendance), and 3)using Salesforce, a cloud-based relational database to store all program data on each beneficiary. Panel presentations will include 1) an overview of the technology used and how it increases program quality and accountability, 2) insights into the challenges and modifications in an urban slum environment, and 3) insights into the challenges and modifications made in a remote, arid, rural area with little to no network coverage. The panel will be facilitated by the project director who will highlight how having integrated, accurate program data is critical for quality and accountability and how it will be integrated into the research study's data. Participants will gain exposure to user-friendly technologies that can be integrated easily into their own programs.

Moderators
avatar for Dr. Karen Austrian

Dr. Karen Austrian

Associate, Population Council
Karen Austrian, PhD, MPH, leads Population Council projects designed to empower girls in east and southern Africa. She develops, implements, and evaluates programs that build girls’ protective assets, such as financial literacy, social safety nets and access to education. Dr. Austrian is currently the principal investigator of two large, longitudinal, randomized trials | evaluating the impact of multi-sectoral programs for adolescent girls... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Samuel Kemboi Biwott

Samuel Kemboi Biwott

Monitoring Evaluation, Accountability and Learning Coordinator, Save the Children Kenya
Mr. Biwott is a practicing public health and health information specialist. Previously worked in public, private and international Non-Governmental Organization on various portfolios related to Public Health Bioinformatics. Holds Master of Public Health and currently pursuing 2nd Master of Public Policy and Administration.
EM

Eva Muluve

Program Officer 1, Population Council
Eva Muluve is a Program Officer 1 at the Population Council's Poverty Gender and Youth Program. She has 6 Years' experience in implementation and coordination of Public Health Research Programs, Programming of Electronic data collection tools, Monitoring and evaluation, data analysis and data management. She has a keen interest in working with mhealth and ehealth projects that are geared towards improving quality and access to health by... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 10:45 - 11:30
Cub

10:45

Last Mile Mobile Solutions, Digitizing Humanitarian Assistance Delivery
Limited Capacity full

LMMS is a stand-alone system that uses web-based mobile applications to better manage responses to disasters. The system enables digital registration of affected populations and automates how aid-agencies delivery humanitarian services, resulting in more effective, efficient and fully accountable practices. LMMS improves the effectiveness and efficiency of registration, distribution and project management while increasing accountability to both beneficiaries and donors. In a nutshell it automates business processes in digital software enabling humanitarian workers achieve their goals in a faster and more efficient way.
LMMS is developed by World Vision International for the humanitarian Industry and as such is currently used by over ten (10) International NGOs including UN agencies in over 25 countries.
LMMS is currently used by multiple humanitarian agencies; with diverse user groups including rapid emergency staff who handle human displacements, earthquakes, typhoons and other such responses; the capability to implement cash and electronic credit transfers in addition to managing the dispersal of traditional relief aid items; the capability to leverage modern technological advancements from cheaper smartphone devices to Cloud-based infrastructure for deploying centralized versions of the system
Today, LMMS is being used in urban and rural contexts, in refugee camps and in more settled communities. The system is being used under a variety of architectures ranging from multiple remote server deployments to consolidated servers being used by multiple agencies and local governments working together.
LMMS can work on most consumer grade devices running Android OS, which are easy to get and much cheaper than commercial grade devices. The system can import and export data from and into other systems thus enhancing data sharing and integration of systems.
For more information kindly check out the following links / videos
http://www.lastmilemobilesolutions.com
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iNS8OFE2s30
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qZKMV34Dh4g
http://www.ncciraq.org/en/ngos/activities/item/10371-world-vision-lmms-technology-speeds-up-registration-of-3,000-displaced-families-in-iraq
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BNP3Mi1yzi8



Speakers
avatar for Paul Mwirichia

Paul Mwirichia

Food Assistance Information & Reporting Technical Specialist, World Vision International
Professional Training: BSC Information Technology, MBA (currently in research development) Paul Mwirichia has a strong IT background and has for the last 10 years been involved in Information Technology in the sectors of education, Tea trade and the humanitarian industry. He has been heavily involved in IT support, systems development, training, capacity building, networks & Infrastructure and databases management. Over the last six years Paul... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 10:45 - 11:30
Giraffe 259

10:45

Test the ELAN Data Management and Protection Starter Kit
Limited Capacity seats available

Do you find data management and protection challenges daunting? Want to comply with data protection principles but don't know where to start? Find policies delightful but wonder what you can do today? Come explore the Electronic Cash Transfer Learning Action Network's (ELAN's) Data Management and Protection Starter Kit. Learn what the kit contains and how it can help field staff understand and take first steps toward responsibly managing data. The starter kit includes practical guidance on assessing data risks, minimizing data collection, understanding KYC requirements, registering beneficiaries, understanding encryption, sharing data and de-identification and disposal.
The session will focus on field data management challenges and supporting teams to take first steps toward improving data practices and it will offer participants the chance to share their learning in this area. We'll also take your feedback about if you think it could use some improvements.
Note: The starter kit was created with electronic cash transfer programs in mind, but it may be useful to other programs.

Speakers
avatar for Lily Frey

Lily Frey

Electronic Cash Transfer Officer, Mercy Corps
Lily Frey supports the Electronic Cash Transfer Learning Action Network's (ELAN's) work linking humanitarian agencies and the private sector to improve humanitarian cash transfer through the appropriate use of payments technology. She leads the ELAN's data management and protection work stream, managing the development of the data starter kit. She has worked at Mercy Corps since 2014, with previous experience with the Cash Learning Partnership... Read More →



Monday May 16, 2016 10:45 - 11:30
Giraffe 258

10:45

Open Geo-Data 4 SDGs: A Case Study from Rwanda
Limited Capacity seats available

In our increasingly interconnected world, the Sustainable Development Goals will be difficult to reach, if implementing agencies are not able to access relevant data openly and share data they collect, to allow everyone to be informed on the progress made towards reaching these Goals: It is therefore no coincidence, the term Data Revolution gained momentum in conjunction with the SDGs.
Showcasing the National Land Use Planning Portal (NLUPP) from Rwanda, this presentation highlights the importance of opening up and shows how a map - or today its digital form, a Geographic Information System - is the natural place where data from many disciplines converges, supporting us on our way towards meeting the SDGs.
The NLUPP - launched in 2014 as the first portal of its kind on the continent of Africa - allows the Public, Researchers, NGO and Government officials to easily access land-use plans and other spatial data on the web: "Transparency and making data accessible for the public are important aspects of democracy," said the director of democracy and good governance at USAID in Rwanda at the launch. "Open data makes space for meaningful input from the public, civil society, and the private sector and gives those groups and policymakers access to data to inform civic discussion and policy."
Since its launch, continuously more data has been published to the NLUPP, making this portal a precursor of the Data Revolution for SDGs.

Speakers
avatar for Kaspar Kundert

Kaspar Kundert

Managing Director, Esri Rwanda Ltd.
Kaspar Kundert holds a Master Degree in Geography and IT from the University in Zurich, Switzerland. He worked as a GIS Specialist for UNEP in Nairobi, before spending 18 years in Switzerland, founding and then managing a GIS company. In 2010, Kaspar moved to Kigali, where he founded Esri Rwanda. In Africa, he takes a special interest in advancing innovative mapping in support of sustainable development and in managing (vs. loosing) data, making... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 10:45 - 11:30
Giraffe 257

10:45

The Animal Protection Index: Mainstreaming Animal Welfare
Limited Capacity seats available

In Africa, animal welfare is not a stand-alone issue; it is linked to the achievement of human livelihood priorities, improved food security, increased community resilience, and poverty eradication. The Animal Protection Index (API) platform establishes a classification of 50 countries around the world according to their commitments to protect animals and improve animal welfare in policy and legislation. The World Animal Protection conducted comprehensive country assessments based on the following indicator areas - recognizing animal protection; providing humane education; governance structures and systems; promoting communication and awareness, and; animal welfare standards. The tool is intended to assess policy and so contribute to the inclusion of animal welfare in the global agenda. In addition, the API will leverage key stakeholders to influence countries to improve animal welfare performance, and measure improvements in animal welfare policy over time. The API is part of a broader agenda by the World Animal Protection aimed at mainstreaming animal welfare globally and securing a Universal Declaration on Animal Welfare. Momentum for animal protection has gained significant traction, following declarations around the Sustainable Development Goals on its importance in the agriculture, disaster, diseases, and wildlife contexts.

Speakers
avatar for Tennyson Williams

Tennyson Williams

Regional Director, Africa, World Animal Protection
Tennyson Williams is the Regional Director - Africa for the World Animal Protection. He is an international development specialist with a background in zoology and zoonotic diseases, and experience spanning more than 15 years in INGO management and leadership. Williams has extensive experience directing regional programming across the continent - most recently with ActionAid as International Director for West and Central Africa.


Monday May 16, 2016 10:45 - 11:30
Giraffe 256

10:45

Blockchain for Good: Disrupting Extreme Poverty Using Economic Identity
Limited Capacity filling up

Economic Identity is a birth right of every human being. The blockchain innovation enables a universal ID for refugees, IDPs and people living in extreme poverty.

Current interventions like micro-credit, social ventures, food aid, financial inclusion continues to stumble. Places like Bangladesh, DRC, Sudan, Somalia, Guatemala and CAR etc. where aid pours in millions of dollars continue to suffer.

Why? Because 2.5 billion people in the world don't have Economic Identity! We can solve this in the next 10 years or less with blockchain based identity.

http://finovate.com/finovatespring-2016-best-show-winners-announced/

 


Speakers
avatar for Ashish Gadnis

Ashish Gadnis

BanQu (Investor) / UN Women (International Consultant), BanQu / UN Women
http://finovate.com/finovatespring-2016-best-show-winners-announced/ | | Major Accolades - August 2014: Change Maker Award Winner (ARC) - Coding Schools for Refugees - September 2013: Selected by Clinton Global Initiative -- DRC Action Committee - January 2010: Delivered 48 tons of life saving supplies for Haiti Earthquake Victims - May 2010, 2011, 2012: NetSuite Partner of Year Award (net new $10MM licenses) - June 2009: Minority Business... Read More →



Monday May 16, 2016 10:45 - 11:30
Giraffe 260

10:45

Can mCommerce Lead to Economic Sustainability?
Limited Capacity seats available

How do you make it possible for millions of people to become self-sustainable business owners? The new tech startup Sky.Garden intends to do just that.

Sky.Garden introduces an app for internet enabled phones for individuals and small businesses in the spring of 2016, starting in Kenya. It provides a new way for people with neither the initial capital or knowledge of m-commerce to easily and safely trade or barter goods and services.

The Sky.Garden project address three major pain points:
- Trust between buyers and sellers by applying a trust and verification algorithm.
- Safe payments through and across adopted payment platforms guaranteed by Sky.Garden.
- Sky.Garden expands the range of business by tapping into established infrastructure and by offering alternative ways for buyers and sellers to connect.

This presentation will showcase how new and existing technology is used to tie together disconnected services, and how important it is to zoom in on local culture, when rolling out a multinational project.

Speakers
CG

Christian Grubak

CTO, Sky.Garden
As the Chief Technology Officer and Co-Founder of Sky.Garden, Christian Grubak leads the vision and strategic technology. Before founding Sky.Garden, Christian was the CTO of E-Supplies for more than 10 years; one of the leading e-commerce agencies in Denmark working with more than 300 different clients. Christian is a grantee of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and member of the Gates Foundation Technology Partner Network.


Monday May 16, 2016 10:45 - 11:30
Giraffe 261

10:45

mFinance: Is It a Case of Collaboration or Disruption?
Limited Capacity seats available

As Mobile Network Operators launch Mobile Money, banks launch Mobile Banking services, regulators on the other hand are playing catch-up, with inclusive/cashless/branchless banking policies. Banking executives and ICT experts, have expressed growing concerns of the pervasiveness of Mobile Network Operators on their traditional terrain. The potential of wiping out traditional banking (brick and mortar) services has never been apparent until now. This presentation examines the case of Ghana's financial inclusive ecosystem to ascertain whether the pro-inclusive policies and guidelines have the potential of strengthening the nascent mobile money sector, while weakening the competitive advantage of the more entrenched traditional banking sector.

Out of the six MNOs , there are four active mobile money service providers with an average mobile subscriber base of approximately 5 million. Mobile telephony as an ICT sub-sector is noted to be one of the most dynamic, yet disruptive and transformative sub-sector of ICT anchored on innovation and development. In essence, this presentation attempts to map out the disruptive potential of inclusive digital financial policy as it excludes traditional banking services in Ghana.


Speakers
avatar for Kweku Koranteng

Kweku Koranteng

PhD Candidate, School of Public Leadership, Stellenbosch University
Kweku Koranteng a PhD Candidate at the School of Public Leadership, Stellenbosch University and a visiting research fellow at the Department of Information Systems at the University of Ghana Business School. He the founder of a Transdisciplinary Research Network and the co-founder of ICTD Africa researchers' Network. His most publication was on social enterprise development in Ghana commissioned by the British Council - Ghana and conducted with... Read More →



Monday May 16, 2016 10:45 - 11:30
Giraffe 252

10:45

Beyond Connectivity: Building an Inclusive U.N. Agenda for Internet Development
Limited Capacity seats available

In December 2015, the United Nations reached a new WSIS agreement. Notably, the agreement cites the Human Rights Council and its landmark consensus finding that human rights apply online just as they do online. In a win for privacy, the outcome document calls for governments to review surveillance powers and practices, including interception and mass surveillance, in order to better uphold human rights. It also takes note of serious threats to the freedom of expression and access to information. And it calls for greater protections for journalists and civil society.

Access Now works to ensure that users' rights are not undermined in the name of cybersecurity, promoting a user-up approach that incorporates strong encryption and rapid fixes for vulnerabilities that put users at risk, with an emphasis on improving the entire security ecosystem. Bolstering our work, the recent report by the U.N. Special Rapporteur on the freedom of opinion and expression (A/HRC/29/32), David Kaye, found that encryption and anonymity on the internet are necessary for the advancement of human rights. We strongly advocated for the WSIS review to recognize that access to encryption and anonymity tools is essential to the exercise of freedom of expression online, but governments did not respond to our calls.
he internet belongs to all of us. Our aim in WSIS is to ensure that the development and technology agenda respects human rights. That way, WSIS can deliver on its promise as an open, innovative, and transformative vehicle for inclusive, people-centered development and internet governance.

Speakers
EP

Ephraim Percy Kenyanito

Sub-Saharan African Policy Analyst, Access Now
Ephraim is the Sub-Saharan Africa Policy Analyst at Access Now working on the connection between internet policy and human rights in African Union member countries and is also an affiliate at the Internet Policy Observatory (IPO) (at the Center for Global Communication Studies, University of Pennsylvania). He is a member of the UN Secretary General's Multi-Stakeholder Advisory Group on Internet Governance; the Freedom Online Coalition's Digital... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 10:45 - 11:30
Giraffe 209

10:45

Giving Citizens Actionable Information
Limited Capacity seats available

What keeps people awake at night? Can they influence or participating in how their governments develop and implement policies to meet the SDGs?
For many citizens, the media is still their main source of information and it is through the media that many of them are becoming aware of the SDGs and what their governments have committed to achieving. It is also through the media that citizens have been able to express their concerns over the failures by governments to provide services.

Most governments have in the past adopted policies that have made information sharing an anathema which has meant that decisions about public spending, resource allocations have been shrouded under a cloud of mystery and half-truths. For governments to monitor whether they are on track in achieving the SDGs, they have to collect and analyze data which is used to enhance decision making and improve service delivery.

In its watchdog role, the media has an important role not only of interrogating government policies and spending but also enabling citizens to engage with the data that is being collected about them. The media through innovative use of technology can then present the citizens with the necessary tools or platforms to address the real life challenges that they are facing. These tools also provide strong feedback loops as it gives citizens ways of addressing some of these challenges they face.

For example, incidents of quacks operating clinics and treating patients were quite rampant and led to the development of the Dodgy Doctors tool which allows patients to confirm whether the doctor attending to them is registered. It also enables patients to confirm which hospitals are covered by the National Hospital Insurance Fund and can even be able to locate a medical specialist in their region. This information is easily available on SMS.

Another example of a data driven tool is GoToVote which allows citizens to locate voter registration centers, check registration requirements and track polling results. This is information which previously was difficult to get but is now accessible through a simple SMS.

These tools also need to be action oriented to be meaningful. They should help citizens decipher and navigate the complex forces shaping their worlds. They should support evidence-based public discourse and decision making. An example is WaziMap which provides census and financial allocations broken down into categories allowing comparisons with either the county and or national averages.
In South Africa's Nkomazi region considered the epicentre of the HIV/AIds infection, a Cholera epidemic led to a local newspaper taking the lead in developing a water quality sensor network to track the trend of infections.The sensors made from cheap phones help in detecting the levels of contamination in the rivers and sends SMS alerts to citizens.

While media has never caused revolutions, with innovative application of technology, media can help generate political discourse, enhance citizens' abilities to participate in such discourse and compel governments to action.

Speakers
avatar for Omar Mohammed

Omar Mohammed

Knight International Journalism Fellow, Code for Africa
Omar is spearheading the establishment of the country’s first data journalism initiative, as an International Centre For Journalists (ICFJ) Knight Journalism Fellow and is also helping civic watchdog organisations harness new digital tools and open data to drive social change. Prior to joining Code for Tanzania, Omar was a reporter for the New York based Quartz business news site, and has also previously worked for the BBC Swahili Service... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 10:45 - 11:30
Giraffe 207

10:45

Harnessing Tech-Enabled Social Accountability for Peaceful Development in Uganda
Limited Capacity seats available

International Alert's research has shown that well-designed social accountability mechanisms can develop more constructive citizen-state relations and improve community capacities to resolve conflict in fragile situations. Harnessing appropriate technologies can boost the impact of these mechanisms, particularly in fragile contexts where civic space is limited.

Alert is going to pilot a such a mechanism in western Uganda - where the research was conducted - using ZenDesk and voice-recognition technology to log and record community concerns and grievances, share them with local and district government officials, and have them independently monitored and verified by our local partners. The pilot will also use pioneering voting technology using ultra low-cost hardware to allow communities to rate responses to their concerns as well as highlight which grievances they see as most important.

In the session, Jo (who conducted the research) will speak about the governance and technology context in Western Uganda, the accountability challenges currently faced by these communities, and the recommendations made by the research about what a technology-based solution can contribute.

Dan will go on to explain and demonstrate how the solution he has developed seeks to overcome some of these challenges, how and why it fits into existing societal norms around communication and citizen-state relations, and explain the challenges in deploying the technology.

Since the pilot will be in the early stages, we see this as an opportunity for audience members to provide feedback on the approach as well as find out more about how the solution could be deployed in the contexts where they work.

Speakers
DM

Dan Marsh

Head of Technology, International Alert
Dan joined International Alert as Head of Technology in 2013. He is committed to using appropriate technology to support Alert ¹s peacebuilding work internationally as well as providing expertise to the sector through talks, blogs and the peacehack hackathon series. He has worked with technology in the charity sector for over 15 years, developing award winning websites and infrastructures.



Monday May 16, 2016 10:45 - 11:30
Lioness

10:45

Promoting Effective Governance Using Technology
Limited Capacity seats available

The understanding that active citizenship have a direct link between transparency and accountability has led to a considerable amount of debate over the years about the need for governments around the world to deepen their engagement with citizens.The Parliament of Ghana is committed to engage with their constituents since it’s the arm of government that directly represents the people. This is in recognition that responsive governments and empowered citizens are important conditions for inclusive and good governance.However, despite attempts to promote engagement between parliament and citizens, there still remain a large population of Ghanaians that parliament is out of touch with; citizens who are not aware of how parliament works and how it relates to their daily lives. These segment of the citizenry loosely referred to as ‘Democratic Outsiders’ are in fact a majority of the population in Ghana.  Our presentation on ‘Promoting effective governance using technology’ will provide evidence on how we are working to close the feedback loop between citizns and Parliament of  Ghana.  Through“Connecting Citizen to Parliament” http://www.assurances.gov.gh project, the Committee on Government Assurance (CGA), http://www.parliament.gh/committees/31 seeks accountability for the people of Ghana using its oversight mandate to ensure government delivers on its promises and assurances. The project since 2014 has sought to transform the majority of ‘democratic outsiders’ in Ghana into active participants by providing digital platforms (online, SMS, WhatsApp, Mobile App and Social Media) through which citizens can amplify their concerns, complaints, satisfactions, suggestions or displeasure on politics, public policy or general governance issues towards causing improvement in service delivery and holding duty bearers accountable.

Speakers
avatar for Kwami Ahiabenu II

Kwami Ahiabenu II

Executive Director, Penplusbytes
Kwami Ahiabenu, II has over nine years of experience in Management, Marketing, New Media, Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) and Development. He was Executive Director of AITEC Ghana and a former board member of Ghana Information Network for Knowledge Sharing (GINKS) Served as a Key Committee Member for the organization of World Summit on Information Society (WSIS) African Regional Meeting 2005. He has undertaken several training... Read More →



Monday May 16, 2016 10:45 - 11:30
Giraffe 206

10:45

Data & Ethics: Emerging Technologies & Dilemmas
Limited Capacity full

International M&E firms adhere to a wide variety of standards when collecting and safeguarding data. ICT solutions-mobile data collection, crowdsourcing, photographic evidence, and satellite imagery-make it easier to monitor hard-to-reach beneficiaries and communities. M&E practitioners need to consider the impact technology is having on ethical considerations affecting the collection and storage of routine data. This session discusses emerging, technology-driven considerations impacting privacy and use, including:
- Ensuring the safety and security of data collectors and survey respondents in the field
- Mobile phones and crowdsourcing campaigns: protecting the anonymity of respondents
- Obtaining informed consent with text and IVR communications
- Privacy and data protection: where you store it and the jurisdictional rules protecting it
- The implications of collecting video, photographic, and high-resolution satellite evidence
- When beneficiaries don't have phones: the challenges of selectivity bias
- Electronic data collection: who's snooping?

Speakers
avatar for Ami Henson

Ami Henson

Director of Monitoring, Evaluation and Learning, QED
Ms. Ami Henson is QED's Monitoring, Evaluation and Learning Director for M&E and Learning support projects in Egypt, Afghanistan Iraq and Uganda. Formerly, Ms. Henson was the Chief of Party for USAID support projects designed to deliver M&E and knowledge management related services for USAID in Kenya, Pakistan, South Sudan and Sudan. Prior to this, she worked directly for USAID on the Sudan Task Force in Washington, DC and as OTI Country... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 10:45 - 11:30
Giraffe 203

10:45

Harnessing the Internet of Things for Global Development
Limited Capacity full

On January 20, we launched joint Cisco & UN ITU report, "Harnessing the IoT for Global Development," where we explore the role of the Internet of Things in helping to reach the Sustainable Development Goals. I believe this is the first comprehensive report pointing to this next frontier in how ICTs can help in development.

As a qualitative analysis on how the the IoT, and in particular connected sensors, can play a role in development, the report first explores existing functionalities of the IoT (the range/cost of sensors; tradeoffs in different wireless technologies) and then highlights current project implementations where connected sensors are being deployed. The aim of the report is to demonstrate that the IoT is already having an impact beyond the existing focus on developed economies and industrial sectors.

The session will cover the main findings as well as other developments in the IoT for development space.

The full report can be accessed at: http://www.itu.int/en/action/broadband/Documents/Harnessing-IoT-Global-Development.pdf
And a blog introduction is here: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/john-garrity/post_10909_b_9009292.html

Speakers
avatar for John Garrity

John Garrity

Global Government Affairs & Technology Policy, Cisco
John Garrity is Cisco's Global Policy Advisor in the Global Technology Policy group, managing government engagement and policy research. John is responsible for data-driven analysis on broadband connectivity issues contributing to the expansion of fixed and wireless networks, including national broadband agendas, Internet protocol network traffic and Internet governance. | With over ten years of experience in economic development in the state... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 10:45 - 11:30
Giraffe 202

10:45

ICT4MEAL - Paperless MEAL System
Limited Capacity filling up

The goal of this paperless ICT4MEAL project is to make use of MEAL transformation by actively using the enabling technology to improve the project management and decision making processes for the larger objective of improving living conditions of CRS beneficiaries and their family. In the case of CRS Ethiopia ICT4D Projects, it enables Donors to get real-time information about the project, CRS Staff to Monitor and Follow up on a project, Partners and government to improve socio-economic conditions bridging the information divide and building resilient communities by ensuring equitable access to resources and information.
This digital system is also useful to improve the collection, processing and sharing of quality data, ensuring the data collected is valuable and accurate by adding a value on the old paper based system creating
- Increased efficiency and effectiveness in Monitoring, Evaluation, Accountability and Learning
- Replacing the time, cost and effort intensive Paper based M&E processes for colleagues across CRS and their partner organizations.
- Improved capability for learning and action
- Ensuring Accountability for the donors and beneficiaries providing real time geo-coordinated data.
- State of the art data presentation dashboards for all level of stakeholders

Speakers
avatar for Yared Gebremichael

Yared Gebremichael

MEAL ICT4D Manager, CRS
Yared Gebremichael is a MEAL ICT4D manager at CRS Ethiopia, he is the focal person to lead the rollout and timely completion of supportive ICT4D digital system for all projects in Ethiopia and some projects in EARO Country Programs. Furthermore, he provides direction and facilitates learning in reflective events and manages communication of M&E findings on all projects of the CP. For the last four years, He lead the implementation of EARO... Read More →


OR pdf

Monday May 16, 2016 10:45 - 11:30
Giraffe 204

10:45

Using OpenStreetMap for Achievement and Measurement of the SDGs
Limited Capacity seats available

The key to good use of ICTs in development, and to the achievement of the SDGs, is not to use technology to reduce the level of in-person engagement and relationships needed to make a true impact in communities. It is to let the tools become channels for even more interconnectivity. It is to create communities that know how to work with technology to achieve more, and to do more themselves. It's not just about filling in gaps from the outside, but working together and allowing local innovations to rise to the top.

Map Kibera is an important local example of the use of ICTs to transform the relationship between a community and information about that community. We started Map Kibera in 2009 as a pilot to inquire what young people living in extremely challenging circumstances could potentially do with new tools of technology, especially using the open digital mapping tool OpenStreetMap, and the Kenya-based crowdsourcing tool Ushahidi.

We discovered that young people and other engaged citizens are very interested to know the facts about their communities, and to be in the lead in gathering, sharing and understanding information about their communities. These resources can be used to transform their environment. For instance, in the last election cycle Map Kibera members created Youtube video interviews with candidates, monitored polling stations using mobile phones and liaised with security when issues arose, and posted real time data about the elections online. They also collected the location of each and every school in Kibera along with the number of students, teachers, classrooms, costs and more, and published this in an online database. But beyond that, they involved those teachers, students and local education officials.

Open mapping tools, especially when combined with other collaborative technology tools such as Ushahidi, data surveying, and social media, can meaningfully engage communities in the process of achievement of the SDGs while providing excellent data for NGOs, governments, and communities themselves to use.

Speakers
avatar for Erica Hagen

Erica Hagen

Director, GroundTruth Initiative and Map Kibera Trust
Erica Hagen is an ICT for Development specialist and co-founder and director of Map Kibera Trust, which created the first free and open map of the Kibera slum in Nairobi in 2009. She is also co-founder and director of GroundTruth Initiative, a company which works with partners to use digital technologies and mapping for greater citizen voice and impact. Erica holds a Master's of International Affairs from Columbia University.


Monday May 16, 2016 10:45 - 11:30
Giraffe 205

11:30

Farmerline: Impact Through Information Value
Limited Capacity seats available

Farmerline, a social enterprise dedicated to improving the livelihood of farmers, has found strength in empowering farmers with information products providing ROI for the farmers. These empowered farmers become less risky as an investment themselves.

Farmerline’s climate-smart agronomic information product delivers good agricultural practices, weather reports, and market information systems for nine crops to farmers in order to increase their profits and make farming practices more sustainable. Created in partnership with leading socially minded meteorological technology companies and agricultural experts, the products are currently implemented in seven local Ghanaian languages. Fish farmers in Ghana saw almost 50% increase in profits over one season of utilizing these information products. Farmerline closes the information gap between farmers and the world market, while farmers pay as little as $0.09/week.

Farmerline also has a powerful android app-based data collection tool that covers many aspects of farmer support from basic farmer data collection to developing relationships with trading partners, through certification procedures, supply chain management, cataloguing and inventory. This app works with the content services to provide support to every level of farming infrastructure across West Africa.

By discussing this technology, these experiences, and asking what parts of the model are transferrable, we can approach what needs to be reimagined across sectors.


Speakers
avatar for Sessie Burns

Sessie Burns

Business Development Associate, Farmerline
Sessie is a math nerd turned policy professional with a passion for high-impact development work, data-driven interventions, and really good coffee. As a student of policy, she narrowed her international interest to focus on cross-sector development solutions, particularly in post-colonial states in Southeast Asia. Sessie supports farmers in West Africa at Farmerline, where she manages relationships between the public, private, and nonprofit... Read More →



Monday May 16, 2016 11:30 - 12:15
Giraffe 255

11:30

Farmforce
Limited Capacity seats available

Farmforce is a web and mobile platform built for use by large scale contract farming schemes composed of small holder farmers. The system allows these schemes to be managed with real time digital data. The system allows company agronomists & production managers to control which inputs growers apply to their fields, ensuring that that approved chemicals are used and that the correct maximum dose, pre-harvest intervals, and maximum number of applications per season are observed. The system provides support for data collection for international safety and sustainability standards such as Global GAP. Farmforce has a loan management module which supports cash and input loans calculated based on the size of farmer's fields. The Farmforce mobile application has a secure harvest purchasing module (including loan repayments) which is integrated with mobile weighing scales and a bluetooth printer for use at collection centers to improve transparency. The system captures data while online or offline enabling technical assistants capture data in very remote areas. The system provides detailed weekly production forecasts. The system supports low end android mobile phones like Samsung Galaxy Pocket which are cheap ($110), portable and easy to use.

Speakers
FK

Faith Kamenchu

Project Manager, Farmforce
Faith Kamenchu is a qualified Project Manager and Business Systems Analyst with over 13 years of experience in Africa with IT, agronomy, and farm management and packhouse management systems. Faith has led teams working in agriculture, horticulture and floriculture. She has worked with systems for farm management (large farms and small holders), traceability, quality management, produce management, payroll and weight management. These systems have... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 11:30 - 12:15
Giraffe 254

11:30

Strengthening Digital Solutions for Agriculture: User-Centered Design and Testing Processes
Limited Capacity filling up

In the agriculture sector, mobile solutions for farmers have failed for three main reasons: First, they're not designed with end-user input. Second, they fail to integrate advisory and financial services-providing only one or the other. Finally, they lack a range of access options-either excluding low-end device users or smartphone owners. A custom bids and offers, created by Souktel and Mercy Corps for Southern Africa, is the first solution that offers user-designed advisory and m-commerce services together, with full mobile money integration and multi-channel access (via USSD or app). This session will show how platform was developed from the end user perspective of small-scale farmers and agricultural product buyers. It will also demonstrate how organizations can launch and manage this platform to strengthen their own agriculture/livelihoods projects, and achieve progress toward SDGs #1 (No Poverty), #2 (Zero Hunger), and #8 (Decent Work) as a result.


Speakers
avatar for Michael Moszczynski

Michael Moszczynski

Chief Software Architect, Souktel Digital Solutions
Michael leads Souktel’s custom digital design team, directing user-centered scoping work across Africa—most recently in Zimbabwe and Liberia. He has over a decade of experience in mobile application design, interactive voice response (IVR), and network connectivity integration. His experience in the mobile industry includes working with large companies like VeriSign, where he designed content delivery applications for clients like MTV and... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 11:30 - 12:15
Giraffe 253

11:30

Achieving Economies of Scale with a Common Digital Health Solution in Africa/Asia
Limited Capacity seats available

For over eight years, World Vision has advanced mHealth as a health and community systems strengthening tool. The World Vision mHealth portfolio has active deployments supporting community health workers (CHWs) and health facility staff in 16 different countries in Africa, South and Southeast Asia.

To support many of these projects, World Vision has invested in the development of a common set of applications built within the mHealth solution, MoTECH Suite. This has been made possible through a partnership with solution providers Dimagi and Grameen Foundation supported by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. The common platform offers an open source software solution tailored to meet the needs of five different World Vision health and nutrition project models or approaches. Using these five global applications as the starting point, the solution application is contextualised in close consultation with Ministry of Health (MOH) counterparts and users at the national and field levels.

World Vision mHealth projects are all working towards transitioning into scale-up phase once consensus and shared commitment to a solution or a package of solutions is reached among key national stakeholders - governments, local mobile network operators (MNOs), and MOH leadership chief among them.

Speakers
avatar for Martha Newsome

Martha Newsome

Vice President, Sustainable Health, World Vision International
Martha Holley Newsome is responsible for World Vision International’s Sustainable Health global programme group, including food, nutrition, HIV&AIDS, and water, sanitation and hygiene. She has a Masters of Public Health from the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health and a BA from Wheaton College in Illinois. She has spent 14 years living in Southern Africa, in Mozambique and South Africa. She recently joined the Scaling Up... Read More →



Monday May 16, 2016 11:30 - 12:15
Giraffe 210

11:30

Use of Electronic Sensors to Improve the Effectiveness of Environmental Health Interventions In Developing Countries
Limited Capacity seats available

Cellar reporting sensors may provide feedback on the sustainability of interventions in developing communities, improving on survey data and infrequent spot checks to assess performance. This presentation will profile several example applications of remotely reporting sensors to assess the proper operation and use of environmental health interventions.

In one recent study in Bangladesh, for instance, our instruments demonstrated more than a 50 percent exaggeration of latrine use compared to household surveys. That result may enable funders and development engineers to rethink how they implement sanitation programs.

In another example, in 2014 we worked on a project to install about 200 sensors in rural water pumps in Rwanda. The purpose was to identify pumps that were broken in order to dispatch repair teams. According to a survey, before the sensors were installed some 44 percent of the area's pumps were broken at any given time, and it took an average of about seven months to get a pump repaired. After the sensors were in place, the repair interval was reduced to just 26 days; consequently, only 9 percent of pumps were broken at a time.

We also evaluated whether awareness of sensors would impact household use of water filters or cookstoves in rural Rwanda. Turns out, there was a dramatic impact: a nearly 63 percent increase in the use of water filters in the first week, which declined slowly over the subsequent four weeks.

Working with CRS in Kenya, our team is presently installing sensors and developing management systems for rural water points.

Speakers
avatar for Katie Fankhauser

Katie Fankhauser

East Africa Program Manager, SweetSense, Inc.
Katie Fankhauser earned a degree in Environmental Studies at the University of Kansas in 2013. Katie is a full time program manager for SweetSense Inc. working in Rwanda, Kenya and Ethiopia, while pursuing a Masters in Public Health within the OHSU / PSU School of Public Health. She has several years of experience working on large-scale international health interventions, specifically managing distributions, fieldwork, and... Read More →
avatar for Styvers Kathuni

Styvers Kathuni

Program Manager/Team Leader – Water, Sanitation and Hygiene, Catholic Relief Services
Styvers Kathuni is the head of the WASH unit at CRS Kenya with over 7 years’ experience in designing and implementing WASH emergency and development projects. He has extensive experience with innovative approaches in water point operation and maintenance. Currently, Styvers also oversees the Kenya RAPID WASH Program, a five year Global Development Alliance funded by USAID, the Swiss Development Corporation, and the private sector, where ICT... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 11:30 - 12:15
Giraffe 211

11:30

Digital Access for Schools at the Edge
Limited Capacity filling up

During 48 2nd grade lessons observed by Uwezo in three districts in Kenya, not a single child asked their teacher a question. Mainstream approaches to teaching and learning have changed very little in the past 50 years in Kenya. A lot of repetition, memorization, note taking, reading and assessments. There is very little space for Kenyan learners to express, let alone explore the things they might be curious about. Curiosity, questions and problem-solving are the spaces within which we see opportunity for real learning. Digital access for students means that the 4 walls of their classroom is not a limit a learner's access to knowledge.

BRCK Education is thinking holistically about what this digital access looks like in schools. The Kio Kit (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gYXIF8ELdcQ) can turn any classroom into a digital classroom in minutes: it has 40 "ruggedized for Africa" tablets that are wirelessly charged in the box and a BRCK for connectivity and remote educational content syncing and caching. Our focus on user-centric design and hands-on approach to user experience has made the solution popular with students and teachers. We iterate the solution constantly so the time between the bell ringing and learning beginning is always being reduced. And once learning begins, we are seeing improvements in test scores, cognitive thinking, problem solving and social/environmental consciousness. This is largely attributed to the quality of local and international content curated for the students within our "Learn, Play, Grow" platform.

Speakers
avatar for Nivi Sharma

Nivi Sharma

President, BRCK Education
Nivi Sharma is the President of BRCK Education (education.brck.com) and a thought leader in Education Technology for emerging markets. As a social entrepreneur, technophile and community volunteer, she has dedicated her career to education and is passionate about digital access and community initiatives that foster learning through fun. She is also a co-founder of eLimu (e-Limu.org) and a 2014 EA Acumen fellow.



Monday May 16, 2016 11:30 - 12:15
Giraffe 201

11:30

Touchable Earth: Sharing the Kids' Eye View of the World
Limited Capacity seats available


Touchable Earth is the first app where kids teach kids about the world.

Information is presented first hand in over 700 professional portrait photographs and videos of children aged 7-11, or 14-18, living in each place.

Kids learn important facts such as the geography, capital and the meaning of the flag and anthem. They also gain unique insight into the daily lives of kids across the world through following a school day, visiting families in their homes, and seeing the games they play for fun. Famous locations are visible in 360 degree panoramas.

The App won the United Nations AOC Award for innovation in teaching about culture (Vienna 2013) and was named top 25 finalist Education Apps by the United Nations Mobile WSIS (Abu Dhabi).

Content has been created with assistance of iEARN.org, the worlds largest non profit schools network operating in 140 countries. In November 2015 Touchable Earth partnered with UNESCO Dakar office to expand the program to High School aged children with a pilot chapter successfully created in Mali.

Touchable Earth develops a sense of purpose in young people to promote tolerance in their everyday lives.  Values of global citizenship, gender equality and peacebuilding are inherent in the content.  

The app itself is being fully developed and will be available free on iOS, Android and Web (ePub to follow).  Multilanguage translations are included as they become available as are English literacy tools. 

Speakers
avatar for Tudor Clee

Tudor Clee

Founder, Touchable Earth
Tudor Clee is the founder and producer of Touchable Earth - a multi award winning global education App. He is a Barrister and Solicitor of the High Court of New Zealand and fashion designer. Tudor founded Touchable Earth to positively change the context in which children learned about the world. He is passionate about international development particularly around women's rights. An Asia Society Asia 21 Leader, and Summit Series Alumni, Tudor... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 11:30 - 12:15
Giraffe 200

11:30

Using Technology for Program Quality and Accountability
Limited Capacity seats available

Monitoring program quality is critical to achieving positive change. Technology, especially in hard to reach environments, allows for data to be used in real-time to monitor implementation, quickly address quality issues and hold all parties accountable to agreed upon deliverables. The Adolescent Girls Initiative - Kenya, part of a longitudinal, randomized trial, works with adolescent girls 11-14 years old in two marginalized areas in Kenya: the Kibera slum in Nairobi and rural villages in Wajir County, on the border of Somalia. Program implementers use a suite of tech solutions to ensure access to real-time monitoring data, including: 1) use of the Open Data Kit app on android phones to collect attendance data on weekly girls group and community meetings, 2) biometric fingerprint readers linked to an app on an android phone to collect daily school attendance (which is used to calculate eligibility for a cash transfer conditioned on school attendance), and 3)using Salesforce, a cloud-based relational database to store all program data on each beneficiary. Panel presentations will include 1) an overview of the technology used and how it increases program quality and accountability, 2) insights into the challenges and modifications in an urban slum environment, and 3) insights into the challenges and modifications made in a remote, arid, rural area with little to no network coverage. The panel will be facilitated by the project director who will highlight how having integrated, accurate program data is critical for quality and accountability and how it will be integrated into the research study's data. Participants will gain exposure to user-friendly technologies that can be integrated easily into their own programs.

Moderators
avatar for Dr. Karen Austrian

Dr. Karen Austrian

Associate, Population Council
Karen Austrian, PhD, MPH, leads Population Council projects designed to empower girls in east and southern Africa. She develops, implements, and evaluates programs that build girls’ protective assets, such as financial literacy, social safety nets and access to education. Dr. Austrian is currently the principal investigator of two large, longitudinal, randomized trials | evaluating the impact of multi-sectoral programs for adolescent girls... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Samuel Kemboi Biwott

Samuel Kemboi Biwott

Monitoring Evaluation, Accountability and Learning Coordinator, Save the Children Kenya
Mr. Biwott is a practicing public health and health information specialist. Previously worked in public, private and international Non-Governmental Organization on various portfolios related to Public Health Bioinformatics. Holds Master of Public Health and currently pursuing 2nd Master of Public Policy and Administration.
EM

Eva Muluve

Program Officer 1, Population Council
Eva Muluve is a Program Officer 1 at the Population Council's Poverty Gender and Youth Program. She has 6 Years' experience in implementation and coordination of Public Health Research Programs, Programming of Electronic data collection tools, Monitoring and evaluation, data analysis and data management. She has a keen interest in working with mhealth and ehealth projects that are geared towards improving quality and access to health by... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 11:30 - 12:15
Cub

11:30

Last Mile Mobile Solutions, Digitizing Humanitarian Assistance Delivery
Limited Capacity full

LMMS is a stand-alone system that uses web-based mobile applications to better manage responses to disasters. The system enables digital registration of affected populations and automates how aid-agencies delivery humanitarian services, resulting in more effective, efficient and fully accountable practices. LMMS improves the effectiveness and efficiency of registration, distribution and project management while increasing accountability to both beneficiaries and donors. In a nutshell it automates business processes in digital software enabling humanitarian workers achieve their goals in a faster and more efficient way.
LMMS is developed by World Vision International for the humanitarian Industry and as such is currently used by over ten (10) International NGOs including UN agencies in over 25 countries.
LMMS is currently used by multiple humanitarian agencies; with diverse user groups including rapid emergency staff who handle human displacements, earthquakes, typhoons and other such responses; the capability to implement cash and electronic credit transfers in addition to managing the dispersal of traditional relief aid items; the capability to leverage modern technological advancements from cheaper smartphone devices to Cloud-based infrastructure for deploying centralized versions of the system
Today, LMMS is being used in urban and rural contexts, in refugee camps and in more settled communities. The system is being used under a variety of architectures ranging from multiple remote server deployments to consolidated servers being used by multiple agencies and local governments working together.
LMMS can work on most consumer grade devices running Android OS, which are easy to get and much cheaper than commercial grade devices. The system can import and export data from and into other systems thus enhancing data sharing and integration of systems.
For more information kindly check out the following links / videos
http://www.lastmilemobilesolutions.com
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iNS8OFE2s30
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qZKMV34Dh4g
http://www.ncciraq.org/en/ngos/activities/item/10371-world-vision-lmms-technology-speeds-up-registration-of-3,000-displaced-families-in-iraq
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BNP3Mi1yzi8



Speakers
avatar for Paul Mwirichia

Paul Mwirichia

Food Assistance Information & Reporting Technical Specialist, World Vision International
Professional Training: BSC Information Technology, MBA (currently in research development) Paul Mwirichia has a strong IT background and has for the last 10 years been involved in Information Technology in the sectors of education, Tea trade and the humanitarian industry. He has been heavily involved in IT support, systems development, training, capacity building, networks & Infrastructure and databases management. Over the last six years Paul... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 11:30 - 12:15
Giraffe 259

11:30

Test the ELAN Data Management and Protection Starter Kit
Limited Capacity seats available

Do you find data management and protection challenges daunting? Want to comply with data protection principles but don't know where to start? Find policies delightful but wonder what you can do today? Come explore the Electronic Cash Transfer Learning Action Network's (ELAN's) Data Management and Protection Starter Kit. Learn what the kit contains and how it can help field staff understand and take first steps toward responsibly managing data. The starter kit includes practical guidance on assessing data risks, minimizing data collection, understanding KYC requirements, registering beneficiaries, understanding encryption, sharing data and de-identification and disposal.
The session will focus on field data management challenges and supporting teams to take first steps toward improving data practices and it will offer participants the chance to share their learning in this area. We'll also take your feedback about if you think it could use some improvements.
Note: The starter kit was created with electronic cash transfer programs in mind, but it may be useful to other programs.

Speakers
avatar for Lily Frey

Lily Frey

Electronic Cash Transfer Officer, Mercy Corps
Lily Frey supports the Electronic Cash Transfer Learning Action Network's (ELAN's) work linking humanitarian agencies and the private sector to improve humanitarian cash transfer through the appropriate use of payments technology. She leads the ELAN's data management and protection work stream, managing the development of the data starter kit. She has worked at Mercy Corps since 2014, with previous experience with the Cash Learning Partnership... Read More →



Monday May 16, 2016 11:30 - 12:15
Giraffe 258

11:30

Open Geo-Data 4 SDGs: A Case Study from Rwanda
Limited Capacity filling up

In our increasingly interconnected world, the Sustainable Development Goals will be difficult to reach, if implementing agencies won't be able to access relevant data openly and share data they collect, to allow everyone to be informed on the progress made towards reaching these Goals: It is therefore no coincidence, the term Data Revolution gained momentum in conjunction with the SDGs.
Showcasing the National Land Use Planning Portal (NLUPP) from Rwanda, this presentation highlights the importance of opening up and shows how a map - or today its digital form, a Geographic Information System - is the natural place where data from many disciplines converges, supporting us on our way towards meeting the SDGs.
The NLUPP - launched in 2014 as the first portal of its kind on the continent of Africa - allows the Public, Researchers, NGO and Government officials to easily access land-use plans and other spatial data on the web: "Transparency and making data accessible for the public are important aspects of democracy," said the director of democracy and good governance at USAID in Rwanda at the launch. "Open data makes space for meaningful input from the public, civil society, and the private sector and gives those groups and policymakers access to data to inform civic discussion and policy."
Since its launch, continuously more data has been published to the NLUPP, making this portal a precursor of the Data Revolution for SDGs.

Speakers
avatar for Kaspar Kundert

Kaspar Kundert

Managing Director, Esri Rwanda Ltd.
Kaspar Kundert holds a Master Degree in Geography and IT from the University in Zurich, Switzerland. He worked as a GIS Specialist for UNEP in Nairobi, before spending 18 years in Switzerland, founding and then managing a GIS company. In 2010, Kaspar moved to Kigali, where he founded Esri Rwanda. In Africa, he takes a special interest in advancing innovative mapping in support of sustainable development and in managing (vs. loosing) data, making... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 11:30 - 12:15
Giraffe 257

11:30

The Animal Protection Index: Mainstreaming Animal Welfare
Limited Capacity seats available

In Africa, animal welfare is not a stand-alone issue; it is linked to the achievement of human livelihood priorities, improved food security, increased community resilience, and poverty eradication. The Animal Protection Index (API) platform establishes a classification of 50 countries around the world according to their commitments to protect animals and improve animal welfare in policy and legislation. The World Animal Protection conducted comprehensive country assessments based on the following indicator areas - recognizing animal protection; providing humane education; governance structures and systems; promoting communication and awareness, and; animal welfare standards. The tool is intended to assess policy and so contribute to the inclusion of animal welfare in the global agenda. In addition, the API will leverage key stakeholders to influence countries to improve animal welfare performance, and measure improvements in animal welfare policy over time. The API is part of a broader agenda by the World Animal Protection aimed at mainstreaming animal welfare globally and securing a Universal Declaration on Animal Welfare. Momentum for animal protection has gained significant traction, following declarations around the Sustainable Development Goals on its importance in the agriculture, disaster, diseases, and wildlife contexts.

Speakers
avatar for Tennyson Williams

Tennyson Williams

Regional Director, Africa, World Animal Protection
Tennyson Williams is the Regional Director - Africa for the World Animal Protection. He is an international development specialist with a background in zoology and zoonotic diseases, and experience spanning more than 15 years in INGO management and leadership. Williams has extensive experience directing regional programming across the continent - most recently with ActionAid as International Director for West and Central Africa.


Monday May 16, 2016 11:30 - 12:15
Giraffe 256

11:30

Blockchain for Good: Disrupting Extreme Poverty Using Economic Identity
Limited Capacity filling up

Economic Identity is a birth right of every human being. The blockchain techology enables a true economic opportuity for the refugees, IDPs, and people lving in extreme poverty worldwide.

Current interventions like micro-credit, social ventures, food aid, financial inclusion continues to stumble. Places like Bangladesh, DRC, Sudan, Somalia, Guatemala and CAR etc. where aid pours in millions of dollars continue to suffer.

Why? Because 2.5 billion people in the world don't have Economic Identity! We can solve this in the next 10 years or less with blockchain based identity.

http://finovate.com/finovatespring-2016-best-show-winners-announced/

 


Speakers
avatar for Ashish Gadnis

Ashish Gadnis

BanQu (Investor) / UN Women (International Consultant), BanQu / UN Women
http://finovate.com/finovatespring-2016-best-show-winners-announced/ | | Major Accolades - August 2014: Change Maker Award Winner (ARC) - Coding Schools for Refugees - September 2013: Selected by Clinton Global Initiative -- DRC Action Committee - January 2010: Delivered 48 tons of life saving supplies for Haiti Earthquake Victims - May 2010, 2011, 2012: NetSuite Partner of Year Award (net new $10MM licenses) - June 2009: Minority Business... Read More →



Monday May 16, 2016 11:30 - 12:15
Giraffe 260

11:30

Can mCommerce Lead to Economic Sustainability?
Limited Capacity seats available

How do you make it possible for millions of people to become self-sustainable business owners? The new tech startup Sky.Garden intends to do just that.

Sky.Garden introduces an app for internet enabled phones for individuals and small businesses in the spring of 2016, starting in Kenya. It provides a new way for people with neither the initial capital or knowledge of m-commerce to easily and safely trade or barter goods and services.

The Sky.Garden project address three major pain points:
- Trust between buyers and sellers by applying a trust and verification algorithm.
- Safe payments through and across adopted payment platforms guaranteed by Sky.Garden.
- Sky.Garden expands the range of business by tapping into established infrastructure and by offering alternative ways for buyers and sellers to connect.

This presentation will showcase how new and existing technology is used to tie together disconnected services, and how important it is to zoom in on local culture, when rolling out a multinational project.

Speakers
CG

Christian Grubak

CTO, Sky.Garden
As the Chief Technology Officer and Co-Founder of Sky.Garden, Christian Grubak leads the vision and strategic technology. Before founding Sky.Garden, Christian was the CTO of E-Supplies for more than 10 years; one of the leading e-commerce agencies in Denmark working with more than 300 different clients. Christian is a grantee of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and member of the Gates Foundation Technology Partner Network.


Monday May 16, 2016 11:30 - 12:15
Giraffe 261

11:30

mFinance: Is It a Case of Collaboration or Disruption?
Limited Capacity seats available

As mobile operators launch mobile payment services, banks are launching mobile banking services. The adoption of Mobile telephony in Africa has been feted as one of the most progressive in the world, this has open avenues for new and innovates services to be developed on such a success. Mobile payment has been a flagship services developed on this nascent technology. The essence of this session is (1) to assess degree of adoption by different countries in Africa (2) the regulatory argument and (3) the blur boundaries within the mFinance business landscape.

The literature underpinning the ensuing discussion was drawn from the finding analysis of 41 research studies on mFinance in developing countries conducted by Chib et al. (2015), illuminating not only in what it reveals but in the shadows that permeate the field.

From this review we consider two issues as significant. First, trust is highlighted as a mechanism factor that leads to adoption. As the poor relies more on physical money and face-to-face relationships and mediations to exchange money, issues of trust may be important for future research, to understand more of its functions and how to manage it. It is important to note how the literature reports that trust can be transferred, being this a remarkable feature to be applied by mFinance practitioners. Second, are issues of affordability. Even though it is considered a main barrier for adoption, the literature shows that cost is relevant only for some groups. The poor must be thought of as a heterogeneous group.


Speakers
avatar for Kweku Koranteng

Kweku Koranteng

PhD Candidate, School of Public Leadership, Stellenbosch University
Kweku Koranteng a PhD Candidate at the School of Public Leadership, Stellenbosch University and a visiting research fellow at the Department of Information Systems at the University of Ghana Business School. He the founder of a Transdisciplinary Research Network and the co-founder of ICTD Africa researchers' Network. His most publication was on social enterprise development in Ghana commissioned by the British Council - Ghana and conducted with... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 11:30 - 12:15
Giraffe 252

11:30

Beyond Connectivity: Building an Inclusive U.N. Agenda for Internet Development
Limited Capacity seats available

In December 2015, the United Nations reached a new WSIS agreement. Notably, the agreement cites the Human Rights Council and its landmark consensus finding that human rights apply online just as they do online. In a win for privacy, the outcome document calls for governments to review surveillance powers and practices, including interception and mass surveillance, in order to better uphold human rights. It also takes note of serious threats to the freedom of expression and access to information. And it calls for greater protections for journalists and civil society.

Access Now works to ensure that users' rights are not undermined in the name of cybersecurity, promoting a user-up approach that incorporates strong encryption and rapid fixes for vulnerabilities that put users at risk, with an emphasis on improving the entire security ecosystem. Bolstering our work, the recent report by the U.N. Special Rapporteur on the freedom of opinion and expression (A/HRC/29/32), David Kaye, found that encryption and anonymity on the internet are necessary for the advancement of human rights. We strongly advocated for the WSIS review to recognize that access to encryption and anonymity tools is essential to the exercise of freedom of expression online, but governments did not respond to our calls.
he internet belongs to all of us. Our aim in WSIS is to ensure that the development and technology agenda respects human rights. That way, WSIS can deliver on its promise as an open, innovative, and transformative vehicle for inclusive, people-centered development and internet governance.

Speakers
EP

Ephraim Percy Kenyanito

Sub-Saharan African Policy Analyst, Access Now
Ephraim is the Sub-Saharan Africa Policy Analyst at Access Now working on the connection between internet policy and human rights in African Union member countries and is also an affiliate at the Internet Policy Observatory (IPO) (at the Center for Global Communication Studies, University of Pennsylvania). He is a member of the UN Secretary General's Multi-Stakeholder Advisory Group on Internet Governance; the Freedom Online Coalition's Digital... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 11:30 - 12:15
Giraffe 209

11:30

Giving Citizens Actionable Information
Limited Capacity seats available

What keeps people awake at night? Can they influence or participating in how their governments develop and implement policies to meet the SDGs?
For many citizens, the media is still their main source of information and it is through the media that many of them are becoming aware of the SDGs and what their governments have committed to achieving. It is also through the media that citizens have been able to express their concerns over the failures by governments to provide services.

Most governments have in the past adopted policies that have made information sharing an anathema which has meant that decisions about public spending, resource allocations have been shrouded under a cloud of mystery and half-truths. For governments to monitor whether they are on track in achieving the SDGs, they have to collect and analyze data which is used to enhance decision making and improve service delivery.

In its watchdog role, the media has an important role not only of interrogating government policies and spending but also enabling citizens to engage with the data that is being collected about them. The media through innovative use of technology can then present the citizens with the necessary tools or platforms to address the real life challenges that they are facing. These tools also provide strong feedback loops as it gives citizens ways of addressing some of these challenges they face.

For example, incidents of quacks operating clinics and treating patients were quite rampant and led to the development of the Dodgy Doctors tool which allows patients to confirm whether the doctor attending to them is registered. It also enables patients to confirm which hospitals are covered by the National Hospital Insurance Fund and can even be able to locate a medical specialist in their region. This information is easily available on SMS.

Another example of a data driven tool is GoToVote which allows citizens to locate voter registration centers, check registration requirements and track polling results. This is information which previously was difficult to get but is now accessible through a simple SMS.

These tools also need to be action oriented to be meaningful. They should help citizens decipher and navigate the complex forces shaping their worlds. They should support evidence-based public discourse and decision making. An example is WaziMap which provides census and financial allocations broken down into categories allowing comparisons with either the county and or national averages.
In South Africa's Nkomazi region considered the epicentre of the HIV/AIds infection, a Cholera epidemic led to a local newspaper taking the lead in developing a water quality sensor network to track the trend of infections.The sensors made from cheap phones help in detecting the levels of contamination in the rivers and sends SMS alerts to citizens.

While media has never caused revolutions, with innovative application of technology, media can help generate political discourse, enhance citizens' abilities to participate in such discourse and compel governments to action.

Speakers
avatar for Omar Mohammed

Omar Mohammed

Knight International Journalism Fellow, Code for Africa
Omar is spearheading the establishment of the country’s first data journalism initiative, as an International Centre For Journalists (ICFJ) Knight Journalism Fellow and is also helping civic watchdog organisations harness new digital tools and open data to drive social change. Prior to joining Code for Tanzania, Omar was a reporter for the New York based Quartz business news site, and has also previously worked for the BBC Swahili Service... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 11:30 - 12:15
Giraffe 207

11:30

Harnessing Tech-Enabled Social Accountability for Peaceful Development in Uganda
Limited Capacity seats available

International Alert's research has shown that well-designed social accountability mechanisms can develop more constructive citizen-state relations and improve community capacities to resolve conflict in fragile situations. Harnessing appropriate technologies can boost the impact of these mechanisms, particularly in fragile contexts where civic space is limited.

Alert is going to pilot a such a mechanism in western Uganda - where the research was conducted - using ZenDesk and voice-recognition technology to log and record community concerns and grievances, share them with local and district government officials, and have them independently monitored and verified by our local partners. The pilot will also use pioneering voting technology using ultra low-cost hardware to allow communities to rate responses to their concerns as well as highlight which grievances they see as most important.

In the session, Jo (who conducted the research) will speak about the governance and technology context in Western Uganda, the accountability challenges currently faced by these communities, and the recommendations made by the research about what a technology-based solution can contribute.

Dan will go on to explain and demonstrate how the solution he has developed seeks to overcome some of these challenges, how and why it fits into existing societal norms around communication and citizen-state relations, and explain the challenges in deploying the technology.

Since the pilot will be in the early stages, we see this as an opportunity for audience members to provide feedback on the approach as well as find out more about how the solution could be deployed in the contexts where they work.

Speakers
DM

Dan Marsh

Head of Technology, International Alert
Dan joined International Alert as Head of Technology in 2013. He is committed to using appropriate technology to support Alert ¹s peacebuilding work internationally as well as providing expertise to the sector through talks, blogs and the peacehack hackathon series. He has worked with technology in the charity sector for over 15 years, developing award winning websites and infrastructures.



Monday May 16, 2016 11:30 - 12:15
Lioness

11:30

Promoting Effective Governance Using Technology
Limited Capacity seats available

Established on the 18th of July 2001 as a non-profit organisation, Penplusbytes is committed to enhancing governance by deepening citizen's participation through ICT. Penplusbytes' overarching philosophy is that establishing effective working relationships with governments, parliaments, corporate organisations, donors, international organisations, non-profits organisations and citizens is the key to being relevant and delivering value.

The organisation currently organises its work around three thematic areas namely;

Extractives (Mining, Oil and Gas)
New Media and Innovations and
The use of New Digital Technologies to drive Good Governance and Transparency.

Speakers
avatar for Kwami Ahiabenu II

Kwami Ahiabenu II

Executive Director, Penplusbytes
Kwami Ahiabenu, II has over nine years of experience in Management, Marketing, New Media, Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) and Development. He was Executive Director of AITEC Ghana and a former board member of Ghana Information Network for Knowledge Sharing (GINKS) Served as a Key Committee Member for the organization of World Summit on Information Society (WSIS) African Regional Meeting 2005. He has undertaken several training... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 11:30 - 12:15
Giraffe 206

11:30

Data & Ethics: Emerging Technologies & Dilemmas
Limited Capacity filling up

International M&E firms adhere to a wide variety of standards when collecting and safeguarding data. ICT solutions-mobile data collection, crowdsourcing, photographic evidence, and satellite imagery-make it easier to monitor hard-to-reach beneficiaries and communities. M&E practitioners need to consider the impact technology is having on ethical considerations affecting the collection and storage of routine data. This session discusses emerging, technology-driven considerations impacting privacy and use, including:
- Ensuring the safety and security of data collectors and survey respondents in the field
- Mobile phones and crowdsourcing campaigns: protecting the anonymity of respondents
- Obtaining informed consent with text and IVR communications
- Privacy and data protection: where you store it and the jurisdictional rules protecting it
- The implications of collecting video, photographic, and high-resolution satellite evidence
- When beneficiaries don't have phones: the challenges of selectivity bias
- Electronic data collection: who's snooping?

Speakers
avatar for Ami Henson

Ami Henson

Director of Monitoring, Evaluation and Learning, QED
Ms. Ami Henson is QED's Monitoring, Evaluation and Learning Director for M&E and Learning support projects in Egypt, Afghanistan Iraq and Uganda. Formerly, Ms. Henson was the Chief of Party for USAID support projects designed to deliver M&E and knowledge management related services for USAID in Kenya, Pakistan, South Sudan and Sudan. Prior to this, she worked directly for USAID on the Sudan Task Force in Washington, DC and as OTI Country... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 11:30 - 12:15
Giraffe 203

11:30

Harnessing the Internet of Things for Global Development
Limited Capacity full

On January 20, we launched joint Cisco & UN ITU report, "Harnessing the IoT for Global Development," where we explore the role of the Internet of Things in helping to reach the Sustainable Development Goals. I believe this is the first comprehensive report pointing to this next frontier in how ICTs can help in development.

As a qualitative analysis on how the the IoT, and in particular connected sensors, can play a role in development, the report first explores existing functionalities of the IoT (the range/cost of sensors; tradeoffs in different wireless technologies) and then highlights current project implementations where connected sensors are being deployed. The aim of the report is to demonstrate that the IoT is already having an impact beyond the existing focus on developed economies and industrial sectors.

The session will cover the main findings as well as other developments in the IoT for development space.

The full report can be accessed at: http://www.itu.int/en/action/broadband/Documents/Harnessing-IoT-Global-Development.pdf
And a blog introduction is here: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/john-garrity/post_10909_b_9009292.html

Speakers
avatar for John Garrity

John Garrity

Global Government Affairs & Technology Policy, Cisco
John Garrity is Cisco's Global Policy Advisor in the Global Technology Policy group, managing government engagement and policy research. John is responsible for data-driven analysis on broadband connectivity issues contributing to the expansion of fixed and wireless networks, including national broadband agendas, Internet protocol network traffic and Internet governance. | With over ten years of experience in economic development in the state... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 11:30 - 12:15
Giraffe 202

11:30

ICT4MEAL - Paperless MEAL System
Limited Capacity full

The goal of this paperless ICT4MEAL project is to make use of MEAL transformation by actively using the enabling technology to improve the project management and decision making processes for the larger objective of improving living conditions of CRS beneficiaries and their family. In the case of CRS Ethiopia ICT4D Projects, it enables Donors to get real-time information about the project, CRS Staff to Monitor and Follow up on a project, Partners and government to improve socio-economic conditions bridging the information divide and building resilient communities by ensuring equitable access to resources and information.
This digital system is also useful to improve the collection, processing and sharing of quality data, ensuring the data collected is valuable and accurate by adding a value on the old paper based system creating
- Increased efficiency and effectiveness in Monitoring, Evaluation, Accountability and Learning
- Replacing the time, cost and effort intensive Paper based M&E processes for colleagues across CRS and their partner organizations.
- Improved capability for learning and action
- Ensuring Accountability for the donors and beneficiaries providing real time geo-coordinated data.
- State of the art data presentation dashboards for all level of stakeholders

Speakers
avatar for Yared Gebremichael

Yared Gebremichael

MEAL ICT4D Manager, CRS
Yared Gebremichael is a MEAL ICT4D manager at CRS Ethiopia, he is the focal person to lead the rollout and timely completion of supportive ICT4D digital system for all projects in Ethiopia and some projects in EARO Country Programs. Furthermore, he provides direction and facilitates learning in reflective events and manages communication of M&E findings on all projects of the CP. For the last four years, He lead the implementation of EARO... Read More →


OR pdf

Monday May 16, 2016 11:30 - 12:15
Giraffe 204

11:30

Using OpenStreetMap for Achievement and Measurement of the SDGs
Limited Capacity seats available

The key to good use of ICTs in development, and to the achievement of the SDGs, is not to use technology to reduce the level of in-person engagement and relationships needed to make a true impact in communities. It is to let the tools become channels for even more interconnectivity. It is to create communities that know how to work with technology to achieve more, and to do more themselves. It's not just about filling in gaps from the outside, but working together and allowing local innovations to rise to the top.

Map Kibera is an important local example of the use of ICTs to transform the relationship between a community and information about that community. We started Map Kibera in 2009 as a pilot to inquire what young people living in extremely challenging circumstances could potentially do with new tools of technology, especially using the open digital mapping tool OpenStreetMap, and the Kenya-based crowdsourcing tool Ushahidi.

We discovered that young people and other engaged citizens are very interested to know the facts about their communities, and to be in the lead in gathering, sharing and understanding information about their communities. These resources can be used to transform their environment. For instance, in the last election cycle Map Kibera members created Youtube video interviews with candidates, monitored polling stations using mobile phones and liaised with security when issues arose, and posted real time data about the elections online. They also collected the location of each and every school in Kibera along with the number of students, teachers, classrooms, costs and more, and published this in an online database. But beyond that, they involved those teachers, students and local education officials.

Open mapping tools, especially when combined with other collaborative technology tools such as Ushahidi, data surveying, and social media, can meaningfully engage communities in the process of achievement of the SDGs while providing excellent data for NGOs, governments, and communities themselves to use.

Speakers
avatar for Erica Hagen

Erica Hagen

Director, GroundTruth Initiative and Map Kibera Trust
Erica Hagen is an ICT for Development specialist and co-founder and director of Map Kibera Trust, which created the first free and open map of the Kibera slum in Nairobi in 2009. She is also co-founder and director of GroundTruth Initiative, a company which works with partners to use digital technologies and mapping for greater citizen voice and impact. Erica holds a Master's of International Affairs from Columbia University.


Monday May 16, 2016 11:30 - 12:15
Giraffe 205

11:30

OpenSRP - a Fresh HCD-Based Approach to mHealth Being Scaled in Bangladesh, Indonesia and Pakistan (1.5 Hours)
Limited Capacity full

OpenSRP (Open Smart Register Platform) is a WHO/ UNICEF-supported platform for frontline health-workers (FHWs) that is being scaled up in Bangladesh by the Ministry of Health for a variety of health domains. Having learned from deficiencies of mHealth platforms in the past, OpenSRP has taken a fresh approach to empowering community health-workers using mobile devices. Most current mHealth technology solutions have a number of important deficiencies such as the following:
- many mHealth initiatives have focused on the data collection aspect of FHW's work and disregarded their needs for decision-making, prioritized interventions, targeted and customized communications etc.
- in an effort to focus primarily on FHWs, the needs of the supervisory layer of FHWs have often been by-passed or de-prioritized in many mHealth initiatives thus leading to lack of appropriate incentive structures in the health system as a whole to adopt mHealth
- the "form-based" approach taken by most mHealth platforms presents a very different orientation to the one that FHWs are generally accustomed to where they fill up individual beneficiary information in rows and columns
- most mHealth platforms are not integrated with national health information systems such as DHIS2

OpenSRP offers a completely fresh approach to creating an mHealth platform using human-centered design principles, taking the above issues into consideration, and trying to mimic the workflow of a typical FHW and the physical orientation of manual register books.

The Bangladesh government has already adopted OpenSRP for a number of health domains and will likely scale it up nationally in the next few years. This presentation will highlight the unique approach taken by OpenSRP having learned from previous deficiencies and the lessons learned in gradual scale-up of OpenSRP implementation in Bangladesh.

Moderators
avatar for Mridul Chowdhury

Mridul Chowdhury

CEO, mPower Social Enterprises Ltd.
Mridul Chowdhury has extensive experience in development and technology innovation in developing countries. He is the Founder and CEO of mPower Social Enterprises, a global company specializing in the use of mobile phones for innovative social & public health applications. He has spearheaded several innovations in the area of information technologies for development that have earned many international accolades, including the MIT 100K Business... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Matt Berg

Matt Berg

CEO, Ona
Based in Nairobi, Kenya Matt is CEO of Ona. Prior to co-founding Ona, Matt served as the ICT Director for Modi Research Group at Columbia University and was the country director for the Geekcorps' Mali program where his work focused on promoting ICT and information access in rural Mali. Matt is a PopTech! Social Innovation Fellow and was named to the 2010 Time 100 List for his technology work in Africa. Matt has an MBA in International Management... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Alain Labrique

Dr. Alain Labrique

PhD, MHS, MS, Director, Johns Hopkins University Global Health Initiative & Associate Professor Department of International Health /Epidemiology at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Department of Community-Public Health at Johns Hopkins School of Nursing, and Division of Health Sciences Informatics at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, John Hopkins University
Dr. Alain Labrique is the founding director of the Johns Hopkins University Global mHealth Initiative, a multi-disciplinary Center of Excellence of over 140 projects engaged in mHealth innovation and research across the Johns Hopkins system. | | An infectious disease epidemiologist with training in molecular biology and over a decade of field experience running large population-based research studies in low and middle-income countries, he... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Garrett Mehl

Dr. Garrett Mehl

Scientist, World Health Organization
Dr. Garrett Mehl leads work on digital innovations for reproductive, maternal and child health at WHO. This includes evidence synthesis as manager of the WHO Technical and Evidence Review Group on mHealth for Reproductive, Maternal, Newborn and Child Health (mTERG), and as WHO implementation research lead in the WHO UN Foundation partnership for scale-up of mHealth solutions through the “UN EWEC IWG Catalytic Scale-up Grant Program for... Read More →
SM

Shama Mohammed

Country Director, Pakistan, Interactive Research and Development
Shama Mohammed is the Country Director for Pakistan at IRD, one of the founding organizations of the THRIVE consortium, and is part of the team that is rolling out OpenSRP in Pakistan. Previously she has participated in an mHealth project to track a cohort of children during their immunizations as part of a Pneumonia surveillance study with children under 18 months of age in Pakistan.  Shama has also worked on a randomized control trial to... Read More →
DA

Dr. Anuraj Shankar

Senior Research Scientist, Harvard University/Summit Institute of Development
Dr. Anuraj Shankar (Dsc) is a Senior Research Scientist at the Harvard University School of Public Health and key advisor to digital health implementations globally. He previously served as Coordinator for Monitoring and Evaluation in the Department of Making Pregnancy Safer at the WHO. Dr. Shankar's current areas of interest relate to building local capacity for use of data in decision-making to scale up services and strengthen quality of care... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 11:30 - 13:00
Giraffe 208

12:15

Farmerline: Impact Through Information Value
Limited Capacity seats available

Farmerline, a social enterprise dedicated to improving the livelihood of farmers, has found strength in empowering farmers with information products providing ROI for the farmers. These empowered farmers become less risky as an investment themselves.

Farmerline's climate-smart agronomic information product delivers good agricultural practices, weather reports, and market information systems for nine crops to farmers in order to increase their profits and make farming practices more sustainable. Created in partnership with leading socially minded meteorological technology companies and agricultural experts, the products are currently implemented in seven local Ghanaian languages. Fish farmers in Ghana saw almost 50% increase in profits over one season of utilizing these information products. Farmerline closes the information gap between farmers and the world market, while farmers pay as little as $0.09/week.

Farmerline also has a powerful android app-based data collection tool that covers many aspects of farmer support from basic farmer data collection to developing relationships with trading partners, through certification procedures, supply chain management, cataloguing and inventory. This app works with the content services to provide support to every level of farming infrastructure across West Africa.

By discussing this technology, these experiences, and asking what parts of the model are transferrable, we can approach what needs to be reimagined across sectors.

Speakers
avatar for Sessie Burns

Sessie Burns

Business Development Associate, Farmerline
Sessie is a math nerd turned policy professional with a passion for high-impact development work, data-driven interventions, and really good coffee. As a student of policy, she narrowed her international interest to focus on cross-sector development solutions, particularly in post-colonial states in Southeast Asia. Sessie supports farmers in West Africa at Farmerline, where she manages relationships between the public, private, and nonprofit... Read More →



Monday May 16, 2016 12:15 - 13:00
Giraffe 255

12:15

Farmforce
Limited Capacity seats available

Farmforce is a web and mobile platform built for use by large scale contract farming schemes composed of small holder farmers. The system allows these schemes to be managed with real time digital data. The system allows company agronomists & production managers to control which inputs growers apply to their fields, ensuring that that approved chemicals are used and that the correct maximum dose, pre-harvest intervals, and maximum number of applications per season are observed. The system provides support for data collection for international safety and sustainability standards such as Global GAP. Farmforce has a loan management module which supports cash and input loans calculated based on the size of farmer's fields. The Farmforce mobile application has a secure harvest purchasing module (including loan repayments) which is integrated with mobile weighing scales and a bluetooth printer for use at collection centers to improve transparency. The system captures data while online or offline enabling technical assistants capture data in very remote areas. The system provides detailed weekly production forecasts. The system supports low end android mobile phones like Samsung Galaxy Pocket which are cheap ($110), portable and easy to use.

Speakers
FK

Faith Kamenchu

Project Manager, Farmforce
Faith Kamenchu is a qualified Project Manager and Business Systems Analyst with over 13 years of experience in Africa with IT, agronomy, and farm management and packhouse management systems. Faith has led teams working in agriculture, horticulture and floriculture. She has worked with systems for farm management (large farms and small holders), traceability, quality management, produce management, payroll and weight management. These systems have... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 12:15 - 13:00
Giraffe 254

12:15

Strengthening Digital Solutions for Agriculture: User-Centered Design and Testing Processes
Limited Capacity full

In the agriculture sector, mobile solutions for farmers have failed for three main reasons: First, they're not designed with end-user input. Second, they fail to integrate advisory and financial services-providing only one or the other. Finally, they lack a range of access options-either excluding low-end device users or smartphone owners. A custom bids and offers, created by Souktel and Mercy Corps for Southern Africa, is the first solution that offers user-designed advisory and m-commerce services together, with full mobile money integration and multi-channel access (via USSD or app). This session will show how platform was developed from the end user perspective of small-scale farmers and agricultural product buyers. It will also demonstrate how organizations can launch and manage this platform to strengthen their own agriculture/livelihoods projects, and achieve progress toward SDGs #1 (No Poverty), #2 (Zero Hunger), and #8 (Decent Work) as a result.


Speakers
avatar for Michael Moszczynski

Michael Moszczynski

Chief Software Architect, Souktel Digital Solutions
Michael leads Souktel’s custom digital design team, directing user-centered scoping work across Africa—most recently in Zimbabwe and Liberia. He has over a decade of experience in mobile application design, interactive voice response (IVR), and network connectivity integration. His experience in the mobile industry includes working with large companies like VeriSign, where he designed content delivery applications for clients like MTV and... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 12:15 - 13:00
Giraffe 253

12:15

Making mHealth Solutions Count in DCs amidst Challenges
Limited Capacity seats available

World Vision's AIM Health project funded by Irish Aid through the Ireland office uses the timed and targeted Counseling (ttC) strategy through a MoTECH suite enabled mHealth application to improve maternal and newborn and child health. The mHealth project with support from World Vision US has outfitted CHWs with MoTECH suite ttC application enabled s devices to address MNCH issues in the project catchment area. The scale of the mHealth deployment is one of the largest in Uganda with over 896 CHWs. Results forthcoming overtime are indicative of the good progress and potential impact of the solution as an efficient, quality guaranteeing resource for community health system strengthening.
At this forum we shall share with the august audience the structural and infrastructural challenges and looming gaps encountered in piloting and rolling out an ICT4D mHealth intervention and how we have managed to harness result amidst these challenges. We will share success and what this success looks like in the face ideal ICT4D implementation logic. We will delve into resourcing and planning needs, stakeholder engagements with MoH and other partners to address alignment to national strategy and systematic and strategic integration for sustainability including other opportunities for scaling. We will share practices adopted and adapted at nation level to guarantee results as we seek to use this opportunity to learn from the wealth of knowledge present at the forum.

Speakers
avatar for Joel Fred Nsumba

Joel Fred Nsumba

mHealth Coordinator, World Vision Uganda
Joel Fred Nsumba is the mHealth Coordinator at world Vision Uganda. He has over 9 year experience in Statistical Computing, Health, women and child programming and implementation, monitoring and evaluation. Over the years, Joel has garnered lots of experience in implementing, Monitoring and Evaluation of ICT4D interventions. He is among the brains behind the implementation of the mHealth interventions in World Vision Uganda office, ensuring that... Read More →



Monday May 16, 2016 12:15 - 13:00
Giraffe 210

12:15

Use of Electronic Sensors to Improve the Effectiveness of Environmental Health Interventions In Developing Countries
Limited Capacity seats available

Cellar reporting sensors may provide feedback on the sustainability of interventions in developing communities, improving on survey data and infrequent spot checks to assess performance. This presentation will profile several example applications of remotely reporting sensors to assess the proper operation and use of environmental health interventions.

In one recent study in Bangladesh, for instance, our instruments demonstrated more than a 50 percent exaggeration of latrine use compared to household surveys. That result may enable funders and development engineers to rethink how they implement sanitation programs.

In another example, in 2014 we worked on a project to install about 200 sensors in rural water pumps in Rwanda. The purpose was to identify pumps that were broken in order to dispatch repair teams. According to a survey, before the sensors were installed some 44 percent of the area's pumps were broken at any given time, and it took an average of about seven months to get a pump repaired. After the sensors were in place, the repair interval was reduced to just 26 days; consequently, only 9 percent of pumps were broken at a time.

We also evaluated whether awareness of sensors would impact household use of water filters or cookstoves in rural Rwanda. Turns out, there was a dramatic impact: a nearly 63 percent increase in the use of water filters in the first week, which declined slowly over the subsequent four weeks.

Working with CRS in Kenya, our team is presently installing sensors and developing management systems for rural water points.

Speakers
avatar for Katie Fankhauser

Katie Fankhauser

East Africa Program Manager, SweetSense, Inc.
Katie Fankhauser earned a degree in Environmental Studies at the University of Kansas in 2013. Katie is a full time program manager for SweetSense Inc. working in Rwanda, Kenya and Ethiopia, while pursuing a Masters in Public Health within the OHSU / PSU School of Public Health. She has several years of experience working on large-scale international health interventions, specifically managing distributions, fieldwork, and... Read More →
avatar for Styvers Kathuni

Styvers Kathuni

Program Manager/Team Leader – Water, Sanitation and Hygiene, Catholic Relief Services
Styvers Kathuni is the head of the WASH unit at CRS Kenya with over 7 years’ experience in designing and implementing WASH emergency and development projects. He has extensive experience with innovative approaches in water point operation and maintenance. Currently, Styvers also oversees the Kenya RAPID WASH Program, a five year Global Development Alliance funded by USAID, the Swiss Development Corporation, and the private sector, where ICT... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 12:15 - 13:00
Giraffe 211

12:15

Digital Access for Schools at the Edge
Limited Capacity seats available

During 48 2nd grade lessons observed by Uwezo in three districts in Kenya, not a single child asked their teacher a question. Mainstream approaches to teaching and learning have changed very little in the past 50 years in Kenya. A lot of repetition, memorization, note taking, reading and assessments. There is very little space for Kenyan learners to express, let alone explore the things they might be curious about. Curiosity, questions and problem-solving are the spaces within which we see opportunity for real learning. Digital access for students means that the 4 walls of their classroom is not a limit a learner's access to knowledge. 

BRCK Education is thinking holistically about what this digital access looks like in schools. The Kio Kit (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gYXIF8ELdcQ) can turn any classroom into a digital classroom in minutes: it has 40 "ruggedized for Africa" tablets that are wirelessly charged in the box and a BRCK for connectivity and remote educational content syncing and caching. Our focus on user-centric design and hands-on approach to user experience has made the solution popular with students and teachers. We iterate the solution constantly so the time between the bell ringing and learning beginning is always being reduced. And once learning begins, we are seeing improvements in test scores, cognitive thinking, problem solving and social/environmental consciousness. This is largely attributed to the quality of local and international content curated for the students within our "Learn, Play, Grow" platform.

Speakers
avatar for Nivi Sharma

Nivi Sharma

President, BRCK Education
Nivi Sharma is the President of BRCK Education (education.brck.com) and a thought leader in Education Technology for emerging markets. As a social entrepreneur, technophile and community volunteer, she has dedicated her career to education and is passionate about digital access and community initiatives that foster learning through fun. She is also a co-founder of eLimu (e-Limu.org) and a 2014 EA Acumen fellow.


Monday May 16, 2016 12:15 - 13:00
Giraffe 201

12:15

Improving Accountability and Facilitating Citizen Engagement in Education in the Democratic Republic of Congo
Limited Capacity seats available

The Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) is struggling to emerge from a long period of conflicts and instability, which had devastating effects on its economy, institutions, and human development sectors (education, health and social protection). Strong GDP growth of the past five years has not translated into improved human development outcomes. In 2014 the DRC shared the lowest ranks in Human Development Index with Niger. The DRC has one of the largest shares of children not attending schools or receiving poor quality education in the world. One of the identified reasons for poor performance of the education sector is poor governance of public education, including broken channels of communications and redress between parents and communities on the one hand, and educational administration on the other.

The team of VOTO Mobile and Moonshot Global is working with the World Bank Group and the Government of DRC to implement a mobile-based social accountability platform that will enable greater transparency of service delivery to the administrators of the public education at the national level and a means for the population and teachers to provide information to the administrators of the educational system at the national and provincial levels.

This presentation reports on progress of the pilot as well as on the design of an impact evaluation put in process alongside the pilot to measure the effectiveness of the mobile accountability platform.

Speakers
avatar for Courtney Roberts

Courtney Roberts

Principal and Owner, Moonshot Global LLC
Courtney, founder of Moonshot Global LLC, has 20 years' experience implementing projects in two-dozen countries worldwide for clients ranging from Arizona State University, to Google, to the World Bank Group. Courtney helps clients leverage technology, innovation, and partnerships to achieve greater impact. Formerly, she led mobile solutions for a division of the International Finance Corporate; was Chief of Party supporting USAID's Global... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 12:15 - 13:00
Giraffe 200

12:15

Using Technology for Program Quality and Accountability
Limited Capacity full

Monitoring program quality is critical to achieving positive change. Technology, especially in hard to reach environments, allows for data to be used in real-time to monitor implementation, quickly address quality issues and hold all parties accountable to agreed upon deliverables. The Adolescent Girls Initiative - Kenya, part of a longitudinal, randomized trial, works with adolescent girls 11-14 years old in two marginalized areas in Kenya: the Kibera slum in Nairobi and rural villages in Wajir County, on the border of Somalia. Program implementers use a suite of tech solutions to ensure access to real-time monitoring data, including: 1) use of the Open Data Kit app on android phones to collect attendance data on weekly girls group and community meetings, 2) biometric fingerprint readers linked to an app on an android phone to collect daily school attendance (which is used to calculate eligibility for a cash transfer conditioned on school attendance), and 3)using Salesforce, a cloud-based relational database to store all program data on each beneficiary. Panel presentations will include 1) an overview of the technology used and how it increases program quality and accountability, 2) insights into the challenges and modifications in an urban slum environment, and 3) insights into the challenges and modifications made in a remote, arid, rural area with little to no network coverage. The panel will be facilitated by the project director who will highlight how having integrated, accurate program data is critical for quality and accountability and how it will be integrated into the research study's data. Participants will gain exposure to user-friendly technologies that can be integrated easily into their own programs.

Moderators
avatar for Dr. Karen Austrian

Dr. Karen Austrian

Associate, Population Council
Karen Austrian, PhD, MPH, leads Population Council projects designed to empower girls in east and southern Africa. She develops, implements, and evaluates programs that build girls’ protective assets, such as financial literacy, social safety nets and access to education. Dr. Austrian is currently the principal investigator of two large, longitudinal, randomized trials | evaluating the impact of multi-sectoral programs for adolescent girls... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Samuel Kemboi Biwott

Samuel Kemboi Biwott

Monitoring Evaluation, Accountability and Learning Coordinator, Save the Children Kenya
Mr. Biwott is a practicing public health and health information specialist. Previously worked in public, private and international Non-Governmental Organization on various portfolios related to Public Health Bioinformatics. Holds Master of Public Health and currently pursuing 2nd Master of Public Policy and Administration.
EM

Eva Muluve

Program Officer 1, Population Council
Eva Muluve is a Program Officer 1 at the Population Council's Poverty Gender and Youth Program. She has 6 Years' experience in implementation and coordination of Public Health Research Programs, Programming of Electronic data collection tools, Monitoring and evaluation, data analysis and data management. She has a keen interest in working with mhealth and ehealth projects that are geared towards improving quality and access to health by... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 12:15 - 13:00
Cub

12:15

Big to Small: Radio and Mobile for Achieving SDGs
Limited Capacity full

This joint panel session will introduce the audience to the combination of mass media and interactive mobile technology for increased engagement to empower communities with a two-way stream of information. Equal Access will describe their programs on countering violent extremism in Chad, Niger and Burkina Faso, and on combating gender-based violence in Nepal. Farm Radio International will discuss how Interactive Participatory Radio Programming can effectively serve farmers with relevant information that can improve their yields. VOTO will discuss IVR as a technology tool through the case studies of Equal Access and Farm Radio, with the aim of guiding audiences on the potential of mobile technology as a tool to achieve the SDGs.

Equal Access International is dedicated to creating positive change for underserved people by combining innovative media programming with direct community engagement activities to inform, educate, and inspire communities. Farm Radio International works with more than 500 radio partners in 38 African countries to fight poverty and food insecurity by broadcasting content that serves the interests of small-scale farmers. Lastly, VOTO Mobile enables organizations anywhere in the world to use a combination of mobile technologies such Interactive Voice Response (IVR), SMS and USSD to design, pilot and scale interactive mobile programs with a focus on amplifying the voices of the underheard and underserved.

Moderators
avatar for Neema Iyer

Neema Iyer

Regional Director of Programs, VOTO Mobile
Neema is the Regional Director of Programs for East Africa at VOTO Mobile. She works with various partners to design and implement M4D projects across health, agriculture, governance, energy and education, using interactive mobile technologies such as SMS, IVR and USSD. With a background in public health, she is passionate about the ability of technology to revolutionize systems through improved data collection, reporting, behavior change... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Natasha Beale

Natasha Beale

ICT4D Specialist, Equal Access International
Natasha is the ICT4D Specialist at Equal Access International where she specializes in the intersection between technology and development. She has managed a range of ICT4D projects in a variety of sectors from maternal and child health to education system strengthening as well as agricultural development. Her current efforts focus on utilizing mobile tools such as IVR, SMS, and mobile data collection to support behavior change communication... Read More →
avatar for Nuwaha Viola

Nuwaha Viola

ICT Officer/Developer, Farm Radio International
Viola Nuwaha is an ICT Officer/Developer for Farm Radio International Uganda Office. She is responsible for training and empowering broadcasters on how best they can fuse technology in the presentation of radio shows and other programs to ensure an efficient dual conversational framework. Her focus is on the use of SMS, IVR and mobile data collection tools. She has also conducted gender and skills training to female farmers on how best they can... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 12:15 - 13:00
Giraffe 259

12:15

Test the ELAN Data Management and Protection Starter Kit
Limited Capacity seats available

Do you find data management and protection challenges daunting? Want to comply with data protection principles but don't know where to start? Find policies delightful but wonder what you can do today? Come explore the Electronic Cash Transfer Learning Action Network's (ELAN's) Data Management and Protection Starter Kit. Learn what the kit contains and how it can help field staff understand and take first steps toward responsibly managing data. The starter kit includes practical guidance on assessing data risks, minimizing data collection, understanding KYC requirements, registering beneficiaries, understanding encryption, sharing data and de-identification and disposal.
The session will focus on field data management challenges and supporting teams to take first steps toward improving data practices and it will offer participants the chance to share their learning in this area. We'll also take your feedback about if you think it could use some improvements.
Note: The starter kit was created with electronic cash transfer programs in mind, but it may be useful to other programs.

Speakers
avatar for Lily Frey

Lily Frey

Electronic Cash Transfer Officer, Mercy Corps
Lily Frey supports the Electronic Cash Transfer Learning Action Network's (ELAN's) work linking humanitarian agencies and the private sector to improve humanitarian cash transfer through the appropriate use of payments technology. She leads the ELAN's data management and protection work stream, managing the development of the data starter kit. She has worked at Mercy Corps since 2014, with previous experience with the Cash Learning Partnership... Read More →



Monday May 16, 2016 12:15 - 13:00
Giraffe 258

12:15

Open Geo-Data 4 SDGs: A Case Study from Rwanda
Limited Capacity seats available

In our increasingly interconnected world, the Sustainable Development Goals will be difficult to reach, if implementing agencies won't be able to access relevant data openly and share data they collect, to allow everyone to be informed on the progress made towards reaching these Goals: It is therefore no coincidence, the term Data Revolution gained momentum in conjunction with the SDGs.
Showcasing the National Land Use Planning Portal (NLUPP) from Rwanda, this presentation highlights the importance of opening up and shows how a map - or today its digital form, a Geographic Information System - is the natural place where data from many disciplines converges, supporting us on our way towards meeting the SDGs.
The NLUPP - launched in 2014 as the first portal of its kind on the continent of Africa - allows the Public, Researchers, NGO and Government officials to easily access land-use plans and other spatial data on the web: "Transparency and making data accessible for the public are important aspects of democracy," said the director of democracy and good governance at USAID in Rwanda at the launch. "Open data makes space for meaningful input from the public, civil society, and the private sector and gives those groups and policymakers access to data to inform civic discussion and policy."
Since its launch, continuously more data has been published to the NLUPP, making this portal a precursor of the Data Revolution for SDGs.

Speakers
avatar for Kaspar Kundert

Kaspar Kundert

Managing Director, Esri Rwanda Ltd.
Kaspar Kundert holds a Master Degree in Geography and IT from the University in Zurich, Switzerland. He worked as a GIS Specialist for UNEP in Nairobi, before spending 18 years in Switzerland, founding and then managing a GIS company. In 2010, Kaspar moved to Kigali, where he founded Esri Rwanda. In Africa, he takes a special interest in advancing innovative mapping in support of sustainable development and in managing (vs. loosing) data, making... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 12:15 - 13:00
Giraffe 257

12:15

The Animal Protection Index: Mainstreaming Animal Welfare
Limited Capacity seats available

In Africa, animal welfare is not a stand-alone issue; it is linked to the achievement of human livelihood priorities, improved food security, increased community resilience, and poverty eradication. The Animal Protection Index (API) platform establishes a classification of 50 countries around the world according to their commitments to protect animals and improve animal welfare in policy and legislation. The World Animal Protection conducted comprehensive country assessments based on the following indicator areas - recognizing animal protection; providing humane education; governance structures and systems; promoting communication and awareness, and; animal welfare standards. The tool is intended to assess policy and so contribute to the inclusion of animal welfare in the global agenda. In addition, the API will leverage key stakeholders to influence countries to improve animal welfare performance, and measure improvements in animal welfare policy over time. The API is part of a broader agenda by the World Animal Protection aimed at mainstreaming animal welfare globally and securing a Universal Declaration on Animal Welfare. Momentum for animal protection has gained significant traction, following declarations around the Sustainable Development Goals on its importance in the agriculture, disaster, diseases, and wildlife contexts.

Speakers
avatar for Tennyson Williams

Tennyson Williams

Regional Director, Africa, World Animal Protection
Tennyson Williams is the Regional Director - Africa for the World Animal Protection. He is an international development specialist with a background in zoology and zoonotic diseases, and experience spanning more than 15 years in INGO management and leadership. Williams has extensive experience directing regional programming across the continent - most recently with ActionAid as International Director for West and Central Africa.


Monday May 16, 2016 12:15 - 13:00
Giraffe 256

12:15

Constructing Spatiotemporal Poverty Indices from Big Data
Limited Capacity seats available

Big data offers the potential of calculating timely estimates of the socioeconomic development of a region. Mobile telephone activity provides an enormous wealth of information that can be utilized along with traditional household surveys. Estimates of poverty and wealth rely on the calculation of features from call detail records (CDRs). However, mobile network operators are reluctant to provide access to CDRs due to commercial sensitivity and privacy concerns. As a compromise, we show that a relatively sparse CDR dataset combined with other publicly available datasets based on satellite imagery can yield competitive results. In particular, we build a model using two features from the CDRs, mobile ownership per capita and call volume per phone, combined with normalized satellite nightlight data and population density, to estimate the multi-dimensional poverty index (MPI) at the sector level in Rwanda. Our model accurately predicts the MPI for sectors in Rwanda that contain mobile phone cell towers (cross-validated correlation of 0.88).


Speakers
avatar for Christopher Wambugu Njuguna

Christopher Wambugu Njuguna

Research Assistant, Carnegie Mellon University, Rwanda
Christopher Wambugu Njuguna is an aspiring data scientist and researcher. He received a B.S. degree in Computer Science from Africa Nazarene University and an M.S. in Information Technology from Carnegie Mellon University in Rwanda. He has worked for over ten years in the information technology field in Kenya and abroad. His fledgling research career includes spatiotemporal poverty level estimation using big data and inferring spatiotemporal... Read More →



Monday May 16, 2016 12:15 - 13:00
Giraffe 261

12:15

Low Cost Technologies in the Scale up of Health Insurance
Limited Capacity seats available

Health systems in low-income countries face challenges of limited resources, poor access, inequity and poor quality of care. An increasing number of these countries are looking to health insurance schemes as a modality for to addressing such challenges and moving forward in the drive to Universal Health Coverage. However, the lack of professional insurance systems renders many schemes inefficient, in some cases unsustainable and in a lot of cases non scalable. The Insurance Management Information System (IMIS) developed under a Swiss - Tanzanian cooperation project in Tanzania is an example of a technology, which provides cost-effective operability in a rural and informal sector context. The application uses mobile phones to support enrolment, renewals, claims submission and feedback collection processes of insurance schemes.

Experience of implementing IMIS in three countries (Tanzania, Nepal and Cameroon) demonstrates how outreach of health insurance schemes can be increased at low cost and common obstacles like identification mechanisms, accountability towards clients, reaching out to remote areas, accessibility to all network facilities, flexibility of insurance model regarding benefit packages, provider payment mechanisms, pooling of funds, and operational monitoring can be professionally dealt with.


Speakers
SS

Siddharth Srivastava

Health Financing Specialist, Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute
Siddharth is a Health Financing Specialist at the Swiss Centre for International Health of the Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH). He works on health insurance projects for Swiss TPH and is currently engaged on their behalf in Nepal, Tanzania and Cameroon. For the past seven years, in addition to other technical aspects of insurance implementation, he has been involved in design and implementation of various information... Read More →



Monday May 16, 2016 12:15 - 13:00
Giraffe 260

12:15

mFinance: Is It a Case of Collaboration or Disruption?
Limited Capacity seats available

As mobile operators launch mobile payment services, banks are launching mobile banking services. The adoption of Mobile telephony in Africa has been feted as one of the most progressive in the world, this has open avenues for new and innovates services to be developed on such a success. Mobile payment has been a flagship services developed on this nascent technology. The essence of this session is (1) to assess degree of adoption by different countries in Africa (2) the regulatory argument and (3) the blur boundaries within the mFinance business landscape.

The literature underpinning the ensuing discussion was drawn from the finding analysis of 41 research studies on mFinance in developing countries conducted by Chib et al. (2015), illuminating not only in what it reveals but in the shadows that permeate the field.

From this review we consider two issues as significant. First, trust is highlighted as a mechanism factor that leads to adoption. As the poor relies more on physical money and face-to-face relationships and mediations to exchange money, issues of trust may be important for future research, to understand more of its functions and how to manage it. It is important to note how the literature reports that trust can be transferred, being this a remarkable feature to be applied by mFinance practitioners. Second, are issues of affordability. Even though it is considered a main barrier for adoption, the literature shows that cost is relevant only for some groups. The poor must be thought of as a heterogeneous group.


Speakers
avatar for Kweku Koranteng

Kweku Koranteng

PhD Candidate, School of Public Leadership, Stellenbosch University
Kweku Koranteng a PhD Candidate at the School of Public Leadership, Stellenbosch University and a visiting research fellow at the Department of Information Systems at the University of Ghana Business School. He the founder of a Transdisciplinary Research Network and the co-founder of ICTD Africa researchers' Network. His most publication was on social enterprise development in Ghana commissioned by the British Council - Ghana and conducted with... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 12:15 - 13:00
Giraffe 252

12:15

Giving Citizens Actionable Information
Limited Capacity seats available

What keeps people awake at night? Can they influence or participating in how their governments develop and implement policies to meet the SDGs?
For many citizens, the media is still their main source of information and it is through the media that many of them are becoming aware of the SDGs and what their governments have committed to achieving. It is also through the media that citizens have been able to express their concerns over the failures by governments to provide services.

Most governments have in the past adopted policies that have made information sharing an anathema which has meant that decisions about public spending, resource allocations have been shrouded under a cloud of mystery and half-truths. For governments to monitor whether they are on track in achieving the SDGs, they have to collect and analyze data which is used to enhance decision making and improve service delivery.

In its watchdog role, the media has an important role not only of interrogating government policies and spending but also enabling citizens to engage with the data that is being collected about them. The media through innovative use of technology can then present the citizens with the necessary tools or platforms to address the real life challenges that they are facing. These tools also provide strong feedback loops as it gives citizens ways of addressing some of these challenges they face.

For example, incidents of quacks operating clinics and treating patients were quite rampant and led to the development of the Dodgy Doctors tool which allows patients to confirm whether the doctor attending to them is registered. It also enables patients to confirm which hospitals are covered by the National Hospital Insurance Fund and can even be able to locate a medical specialist in their region. This information is easily available on SMS.

Another example of a data driven tool is GoToVote which allows citizens to locate voter registration centers, check registration requirements and track polling results. This is information which previously was difficult to get but is now accessible through a simple SMS.

These tools also need to be action oriented to be meaningful. They should help citizens decipher and navigate the complex forces shaping their worlds. They should support evidence-based public discourse and decision making. An example is WaziMap which provides census and financial allocations broken down into categories allowing comparisons with either the county and or national averages.
In South Africa's Nkomazi region considered the epicentre of the HIV/AIds infection, a Cholera epidemic led to a local newspaper taking the lead in developing a water quality sensor network to track the trend of infections.The sensors made from cheap phones help in detecting the levels of contamination in the rivers and sends SMS alerts to citizens.

While media has never caused revolutions, with innovative application of technology, media can help generate political discourse, enhance citizens' abilities to participate in such discourse and compel governments to action.

Speakers
avatar for Omar Mohammed

Omar Mohammed

Knight International Journalism Fellow, Code for Africa
Omar is spearheading the establishment of the country’s first data journalism initiative, as an International Centre For Journalists (ICFJ) Knight Journalism Fellow and is also helping civic watchdog organisations harness new digital tools and open data to drive social change. Prior to joining Code for Tanzania, Omar was a reporter for the New York based Quartz business news site, and has also previously worked for the BBC Swahili Service... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 12:15 - 13:00
Giraffe 207

12:15

Harnessing Tech-Enabled Social Accountability for Peaceful Development in Uganda
Limited Capacity seats available

International Alert's research has shown that well-designed social accountability mechanisms can develop more constructive citizen-state relations and improve community capacities to resolve conflict in fragile situations. Harnessing appropriate technologies can boost the impact of these mechanisms, particularly in fragile contexts where civic space is limited.

Alert is going to pilot a such a mechanism in western Uganda - where the research was conducted - using ZenDesk and voice-recognition technology to log and record community concerns and grievances, share them with local and district government officials, and have them independently monitored and verified by our local partners. The pilot will also use pioneering voting technology using ultra low-cost hardware to allow communities to rate responses to their concerns as well as highlight which grievances they see as most important.

In the session, Jo (who conducted the research) will speak about the governance and technology context in Western Uganda, the accountability challenges currently faced by these communities, and the recommendations made by the research about what a technology-based solution can contribute.

Dan will go on to explain and demonstrate how the solution he has developed seeks to overcome some of these challenges, how and why it fits into existing societal norms around communication and citizen-state relations, and explain the challenges in deploying the technology.

Since the pilot will be in the early stages, we see this as an opportunity for audience members to provide feedback on the approach as well as find out more about how the solution could be deployed in the contexts where they work.

Speakers
DM

Dan Marsh

Head of Technology, International Alert
Dan joined International Alert as Head of Technology in 2013. He is committed to using appropriate technology to support Alert ¹s peacebuilding work internationally as well as providing expertise to the sector through talks, blogs and the peacehack hackathon series. He has worked with technology in the charity sector for over 15 years, developing award winning websites and infrastructures.



Monday May 16, 2016 12:15 - 13:00
Lioness

12:15

Implementing ICT4D in Complex Multiple Emergencies
Limited Capacity full

The Jonglei Food Security Program (JFSP) is a Title II program funded by United States Agency for International Development (USAID) Food for Peace (FFP) and implemented by a consortium led by Catholic Relief Services (CRS) with Save the Children International (SCI) and government stakeholders. The program is implemented in Jonglei State, South Sudan. After decades of war with The Sudan, South Sudan finally seceded and got its independence in 2011. Jonglei State, and pretty much of the whole country is characterized by poor roads, dilapidated infrastructure, lack of electricity in the grid and limited amenities. In December 2013, a political violent conflict broke out, which took an ethnic dimension in the state, diving the state where the program is run, into government and opposition controlled areas adding further challenges for implementation in an already difficult terrain. JFSP employed the use of information communication technologies (ICT) to ease on the logistics challenges associated with implementing a food security project in a conflict situation with very limited infrastructure. The program trained over 50 MEAL and program staff on using ipads for data collection on the i-formbuilder platform and has been using the technology to collect registration, monitoring and survey data on food for asset, agriculture, livestock, water and sanitation and nutrition programs. Field teams sync their data to the server as soon as they came from the field and the data would be immediately available for downloading, analysis and reporting. Use of ipads in the South Sudan context allowed JFSP to collect real time data, produce timely reports and improve efficiency in serving the conflict affected communities. It has revolutionized data collection and significantly improved data quality. The program managed to draw lessons and best practices on the use of mobile technologies in a conflict situation with limited infrastructure, which go beyond the ICT gadgets but incorporate the human element.

Speakers
avatar for Rodwell Masocha Sibanda

Rodwell Masocha Sibanda

MEAL Manager, Catholic Relief Services South Sudan
Rodwell Masocha Sibanda is a CRS Monitoring, Evaluation, Accountability and Learning (MEAL) manager and leads the USAID-funded Jonglei Food Security Program consortium MEAL department. He has been in South Sudan since 2010, and has been with the JFSP since inception in 2011. He was the leader in setting up and rolling out the JFSP ICT system before and after the 2013 crisis, having rolled out a similar system using PDAs in Zimbabwe's USAID... Read More →



Monday May 16, 2016 12:15 - 13:00
Giraffe 206

12:15

Using Mobile to Gather Citizen Views on the SDGs in Tanzania
Limited Capacity seats available

Citizen Engagement and education is an important element in many development projects. With feedback from citizens, organizations or governments can learn how to better target public awareness campaigns, find out what messages are getting through, and obtain vital information on the public's reaction to a local or international initiative. With the launch of the Sustainable Development Goals in 2015, many local agencies are looking for guidance on what goals to prioritize, and direct feedback from citizens is extremely valuable. In the past it has been difficult to quickly reach a large group of citizens across a country, but the prevalence of ICTs and particularly mobile phones is changing that. In December 2015, the UN Tanzania and mobile surveying platform GeoPoll worked together to educate Tanzanians on the SDGs and gather feedback from a select group. This two-staged project first used SMS messages to raise awareness of the SDGs. In just 3 days, GeoPoll and UN Tanzania reached a group of 88,000 Tanzanians in specific states, texting them a list of all the SDGs in order to educate the public on the goals. From this original group, 2,000 received a follow-up survey on which SDG was most important to them. This allowed UN Tanzania to further understand what activities to prioritize in Tanzania. Results showed that ending poverty was the most important SDG to 30% of respondents, followed by implementing the global partnership for sustainable development (13%), promoting peace (11%) and ensuring inclusive education (9%). Without the use of ICTs and the prevalence of mobiles this important feedback would have been nearly impossible to gather, and the 88,000 Tanzanians would not have been educated on the SDGs and their importance.

Speakers
JM

John Muthee

Vice President, Business Development in Africa, GeoPoll
John Muthee is the Vice President of Business Development, Africa, at GeoPoll, where he oversees GeoPoll’s Africa-based sales team and engages with clients to identify needs for mobile surveying research in the international development and commercial sectors. A leader in market and social research with more than ten years of experience in East African markets, Muthee came to GeoPoll after 7 years at market research firm GfK, where he was the... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 12:15 - 13:00
Giraffe 209

12:15

Data & Ethics: Emerging Technologies & Dilemmas
Limited Capacity full

International M&E firms adhere to a wide variety of standards when collecting and safeguarding data. ICT solutions-mobile data collection, crowdsourcing, photographic evidence, and satellite imagery-make it easier to monitor hard-to-reach beneficiaries and communities. M&E practitioners need to consider the impact technology is having on ethical considerations affecting the collection and storage of routine data. This session discusses emerging, technology-driven considerations impacting privacy and use, including:
- Ensuring the safety and security of data collectors and survey respondents in the field
- Mobile phones and crowdsourcing campaigns: protecting the anonymity of respondents
- Obtaining informed consent with text and IVR communications
- Privacy and data protection: where you store it and the jurisdictional rules protecting it
- The implications of collecting video, photographic, and high-resolution satellite evidence
- When beneficiaries don't have phones: the challenges of selectivity bias
- Electronic data collection: who's snooping?

Speakers
avatar for Ami Henson

Ami Henson

Director of Monitoring, Evaluation and Learning, QED
Ms. Ami Henson is QED's Monitoring, Evaluation and Learning Director for M&E and Learning support projects in Egypt, Afghanistan Iraq and Uganda. Formerly, Ms. Henson was the Chief of Party for USAID support projects designed to deliver M&E and knowledge management related services for USAID in Kenya, Pakistan, South Sudan and Sudan. Prior to this, she worked directly for USAID on the Sudan Task Force in Washington, DC and as OTI Country... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 12:15 - 13:00
Giraffe 203

12:15

Harnessing the Internet of Things for Global Development
Limited Capacity full

On January 20, we launched joint Cisco & UN ITU report, "Harnessing the IoT for Global Development," where we explore the role of the Internet of Things in helping to reach the Sustainable Development Goals. I believe this is the first comprehensive report pointing to this next frontier in how ICTs can help in development.

As a qualitative analysis on how the the IoT, and in particular connected sensors, can play a role in development, the report first explores existing functionalities of the IoT (the range/cost of sensors; tradeoffs in different wireless technologies) and then highlights current project implementations where connected sensors are being deployed. The aim of the report is to demonstrate that the IoT is already having an impact beyond the existing focus on developed economies and industrial sectors.

The session will cover the main findings as well as other developments in the IoT for development space.

The full report can be accessed at: http://www.itu.int/en/action/broadband/Documents/Harnessing-IoT-Global-Development.pdf
And a blog introduction is here: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/john-garrity/post_10909_b_9009292.html

Speakers
avatar for John Garrity

John Garrity

Global Government Affairs & Technology Policy, Cisco
John Garrity is Cisco's Global Policy Advisor in the Global Technology Policy group, managing government engagement and policy research. John is responsible for data-driven analysis on broadband connectivity issues contributing to the expansion of fixed and wireless networks, including national broadband agendas, Internet protocol network traffic and Internet governance. | With over ten years of experience in economic development in the state... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 12:15 - 13:00
Giraffe 202

12:15

ICT4MEAL - Paperless MEAL System
Limited Capacity full

The goal of this paperless ICT4MEAL project is to make use of MEAL transformation by actively using the enabling technology to improve the project management and decision making processes for the larger objective of improving living conditions of CRS beneficiaries and their family. In the case of CRS Ethiopia ICT4D Projects, it enables Donors to get real-time information about the project, CRS Staff to Monitor and Follow up on a project, Partners and government to improve socio-economic conditions bridging the information divide and building resilient communities by ensuring equitable access to resources and information.
This digital system is also useful to improve the collection, processing and sharing of quality data, ensuring the data collected is valuable and accurate by adding a value on the old paper based system creating
- Increased efficiency and effectiveness in Monitoring, Evaluation, Accountability and Learning
- Replacing the time, cost and effort intensive Paper based M&E processes for colleagues across CRS and their partner organizations.
- Improved capability for learning and action
- Ensuring Accountability for the donors and beneficiaries providing real time geo-coordinated data.
- State of the art data presentation dashboards for all level of stakeholders

Speakers
avatar for Yared Gebremichael

Yared Gebremichael

MEAL ICT4D Manager, CRS
Yared Gebremichael is a MEAL ICT4D manager at CRS Ethiopia, he is the focal person to lead the rollout and timely completion of supportive ICT4D digital system for all projects in Ethiopia and some projects in EARO Country Programs. Furthermore, he provides direction and facilitates learning in reflective events and manages communication of M&E findings on all projects of the CP. For the last four years, He lead the implementation of EARO... Read More →


OR pdf

Monday May 16, 2016 12:15 - 13:00
Giraffe 204

12:15

Using OpenStreetMap for Achievement and Measurement of the SDGs
Limited Capacity seats available

The key to good use of ICTs in development, and to the achievement of the SDGs, is not to use technology to reduce the level of in-person engagement and relationships needed to make a true impact in communities. It is to let the tools become channels for even more interconnectivity. It is to create communities that know how to work with technology to achieve more, and to do more themselves. It's not just about filling in gaps from the outside, but working together and allowing local innovations to rise to the top.

Map Kibera is an important local example of the use of ICTs to transform the relationship between a community and information about that community. We started Map Kibera in 2009 as a pilot to inquire what young people living in extremely challenging circumstances could potentially do with new tools of technology, especially using the open digital mapping tool OpenStreetMap, and the Kenya-based crowdsourcing tool Ushahidi.

We discovered that young people and other engaged citizens are very interested to know the facts about their communities, and to be in the lead in gathering, sharing and understanding information about their communities. These resources can be used to transform their environment. For instance, in the last election cycle Map Kibera members created Youtube video interviews with candidates, monitored polling stations using mobile phones and liaised with security when issues arose, and posted real time data about the elections online. They also collected the location of each and every school in Kibera along with the number of students, teachers, classrooms, costs and more, and published this in an online database. But beyond that, they involved those teachers, students and local education officials.

Open mapping tools, especially when combined with other collaborative technology tools such as Ushahidi, data surveying, and social media, can meaningfully engage communities in the process of achievement of the SDGs while providing excellent data for NGOs, governments, and communities themselves to use.

Speakers
avatar for Erica Hagen

Erica Hagen

Director, GroundTruth Initiative and Map Kibera Trust
Erica Hagen is an ICT for Development specialist and co-founder and director of Map Kibera Trust, which created the first free and open map of the Kibera slum in Nairobi in 2009. She is also co-founder and director of GroundTruth Initiative, a company which works with partners to use digital technologies and mapping for greater citizen voice and impact. Erica holds a Master's of International Affairs from Columbia University.


Monday May 16, 2016 12:15 - 13:00
Giraffe 205

13:00

Lunch
Monday May 16, 2016 13:00 - 14:00
Nyama Choma Ranch

14:00

Farmbook Suite: Applying ICT in Agroenterprise for Smallholders
Limited Capacity full

Farmbook Suite is a set of ICT tools for smallholder agroenterprise support comprised of three components: Map& Track, eLearning, and Business Planner. Map & Track, a GIS-based mapping and tracking system, assists in recording services delivered and management of farmer groups for value chain operations. The e-Learning component provides a delivery method of SMART Skills courses ( including topics that assist farmers to improve income and manage natural resources) to Field Agents who train farmer groups. The third component, Business Planner, functions to build business plans, assess production costs and profitability of products. The data collected may be collected offline and then synced to a database with a reporting system to generate information for farmers, field agents, market facilitators and buyers.

Speakers
avatar for Sydney Khando

Sydney Khando

Senior Programme Manager Agriculture Livelihoods, Catholic Relief services
Sydney Khando is the Senior Programme Manager Agriculture Livelihoods for the Catholic Relief Services Malawi Country Programme. As a holder of Bachelor of Science Degree majoring in Agriculture from the University of Malawi, he has worked in various capacities in the Agricultural Sector in Sothern Africa both in Malawi and in South Africa. Other than the Bachelor of Science Agriculture he has other post graduate certificates in project... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Kim Tungate

Dr. Kim Tungate

Sr Tech Advisor, CRS
Kim Tungate is an Agroenterprise Advisor for CRS. She has more than 20 years of experience in the agriculture sector. Prior to her work with CRS she worked at North Carolina State University for close to 10 years as: an Innovative Crops Program Manager and as an Agriculture Extenstion Agent for commodity, horticulture and livestock crops. Kim was also a Deputy Chief of Party for the AAAP project at Kabul University. Kim received her PhD from... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 14:00 - 14:45
Giraffe 253

14:00

Improving Market Access and Services for Small-Holder Farmers in Rural Kenya
Limited Capacity full

Micro and Small Enterprises (MSEs) are perceived as the engine of growth in Kenya yet face formidable constraints that hinder them from realizing their potential. The sector generates employment opportunities, provides goods and services and steers competition and innovation. According to a 2013 study conducted by the Kenya Institute for Public Policy Research and Analysis (KIPPRA); MSEs comprise about 75 % of all businesses, employ 4.6 million people (30% of the workforce), accounts for 87% of new jobs created and contributes 18.4 % of the GDP.

In Kenya, majority of the MSEs are agricultural based and women control over 80 % of the total labor in the agriculture sector. A 2010 survey funded by the World Bank revealed that the greatest barrier facing women entrepreneurs in Kenya is access to finance and is an issue because of requirements of collateral. In Kenya only 1% of women own property and that makes it very difficult for women to provide collateral for banks. Most women who venture into businesses in the rural areas and need financing lack the needed collateral to enable them secure bank loans. Further, majority of them are unbanked hence do not have historical financial information significant for securing credit services. Finance is the backbone of MSEs and any other business enterprise. These enterprises need finance to start up, expand, diversify and to sustain their day-to-day operations. Without finance, no one business enterprise can achieve its objectives.

Opportunity: Recognizing the critical role small businesses play in the Kenyan economy, the government through Kenya Vision 2030 envisages the strengthening of MSEs to become the key industries of tomorrow by improving their productivity and innovation. Further, Kenya's new Constitution focuses on giving women equal rights. It gives women property rights by calling for elimination of gender discrimination in law, customs and practices related to land and property in land. It gives married women a presumption of joint ownership of matrimonial property, defined as any property that is owned or leased by one or both spouses during the marriage and occupied by the spouses as their family home. It also protects women's interests in land, putting the onus on purchasers, lenders, and registrars to ensure that women have consented to the sale or mortgage of land in which they have an interest. Despite the adoption of the new land legislation, women operating MSEs still cannot access finance.

Speakers
avatar for Joseph Waruingi

Joseph Waruingi

Managing Director, Advantech Consulting Ltd
I am a senior business leader with demonstrable ability and experience of working on strategic change projects with boards and senior management. I lead the strategy and business development functions of our business. Under my stewardship the business has grown its Sub Saharan African project footprint to 23 countries as of February 2016! I am extensively travelled and well networked globally. I direct the delivery of projects in health... Read More →



Monday May 16, 2016 14:00 - 14:45
Giraffe 254

14:00

Plantwise: Sharing Plant Health Knowledge via ICTs
Limited Capacity seats available

Plantwise is a global programme, led by CABI, which provides farmers with the plant health knowledge they need to lose less of what they grow in order to increase food security and improve rural livelihoods. Plantwise has championed the use of ICTs over the past few years. We train our plant doctors using the PW Plant Doctor Simulator, to ensure that they are able to correctly identify pests and suggest the appropriate management solution to farmers. Together with our partners, we have piloted the introduction of SIM-equipped Android tablets at plant clinics and monitoring their impact.

Plant doctors are encouraged to use the PW Factsheet Library app to access the Plantwise Knowledge Bank (which contains over 10,000 factsheets covering 4,000 plants and 2,500 pests) and provide accurate diagnoses even when offline. The tablets also allow plant doctors to communicate with each other as well as national and international diagnostic experts via instant messaging services.

When a farmer visits a local plant clinic, their details and the diagnosis and treatment advice are all logged using an online management system. This allows Plantwise to monitor the doctors' recommendations to ensure they are accurate and comply with best practice. It also allows us to provide the clinic data to plant protection agencies and researchers, enabling them to track outbreaks of new crop pests and analyze their spread close to real time.

This presentation will be accompanied by an interactive exhibit.

Speakers
avatar for Dr. Washington Otieno

Dr. Washington Otieno

Plantwise Programme Executive, CABI
Dr Otieno has over 25 years' experience in agricultural research and development, specializing in plant protection and agricultural biosecurity. Over the past 10 years he has engaged in a number of initiatives that support improving plant health systems of developing countries, including several national organizations in Kenya, USAID and the Secretariat of the IPPC. In 2013 he joined CABI as the Plantwise Programme Regional Coordinator for... Read More →



Monday May 16, 2016 14:00 - 14:45
Giraffe 255

14:00

Designing a Mobile Partograph for Safer Maternal Deliveries
Limited Capacity seats available

Prolonged and obstructed labor is one of the leading causes of maternal and newborn mortality. The partograph, a one-page paper form, has been universally recommended by WHO since 1994 as an effective tool for the early detection of complications during labor, thereby reducing prolonged labor, intrapartum stillbirths, and emergency caesarean sections. While it has been hailed as a highly effective, low-cost method of reducing maternal and fetal mortality, the adoption of the partograph remains low in low-resource settings despite decades of training and investment. Health providers find the graph format and its instructions too complex to follow.

To address these challenges, Dimagi developed a mobile application version of the partograph, called "mLabour," built on Dimagi's mHealth platform, CommCare. Designed to significantly reduce health workers' workload, mLabour - piloted in India in early 2015 at the Abdul Hakeem Centenary Hospital - features built-in clinical protocols that detect and manage abnormal labor progress, automatic graphing, reminders to conduct timely patient exams, messaging capabilities to notify staff of emergency cases, and web-based reports for supervisors and administrators. Initial results showed a reduction in the number of patients who were neglected (100% births had a mobile partograph completed, compared to 12.5% on paper) and in follow-up time.

In this presentation, Dimagi's Carla Legros will describe the process of designing and developing the mLabour application and present the evaluation methodologies and results that came out of the pilot. Participants will learn about the unique challenges and considerations that come with designing and piloting ICT tools for intrapartum care in low-resource clinical settings.

Speakers
avatar for Carla Legros

Carla Legros

Project Manager, Dimagi
Carla Legros is a Project Manager at Dimagi and has worked on over 10 ICT4D projects in Africa, developing and supporting clients in launch mobile tools for health services. Primarily her work has been in nutrition, designing applications to screen, treat and provide recommendations for malnourished pregnant women and children under five years old. One such application, launched in 4 countries in Africa, screened over 10,000 target... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 14:00 - 14:45
Giraffe 208

14:00

Making mHealth Solutions Count in DCs amidst Challenges
Limited Capacity seats available

World Vision's AIM Health project funded by Irish Aid through the Ireland office uses the timed and targeted Counseling (ttC) strategy through a MoTECH suite enabled mHealth application to improve maternal and newborn and child health. The mHealth project with support from World Vision US has outfitted CHWs with MoTECH suite ttC application enabled s devices to address MNCH issues in the project catchment area. The scale of the mHealth deployment is one of the largest in Uganda with over 896 CHWs. Results forthcoming overtime are indicative of the good progress and potential impact of the solution as an efficient, quality guaranteeing resource for community health system  strengthening.
At this forum we shall share with the august audience the structural and infrastructural challenges and looming gaps encountered in piloting and rolling out an ICT4D mHealth intervention and how we have managed to harness result amidst these challenges. We will share success and what this success looks like in the face ideal ICT4D implementation logic. We will delve into resourcing and planning needs, stakeholder engagements with MoH and other partners to address alignment to national strategy and systematic and strategic integration for sustainability including other opportunities for scaling. We will share practices adopted and adapted at nation level to guarantee results as we seek to use this opportunity to learn from the wealth of knowledge present at the forum.

Speakers
avatar for Joel Fred Nsumba

Joel Fred Nsumba

mHealth Coordinator, World Vision Uganda
Joel Fred Nsumba is the mHealth Coordinator at world Vision Uganda. He has over 9 year experience in Statistical Computing, Health, women and child programming and implementation, monitoring and evaluation. Over the years, Joel has garnered lots of experience in implementing, Monitoring and Evaluation of ICT4D interventions. He is among the brains behind the implementation of the mHealth interventions in World Vision Uganda office, ensuring that... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 14:00 - 14:45
Giraffe 210

14:00

Mobile Technology for Health in Ghana (MOTECH): Overview of Platform Message Delivery and User Response
Limited Capacity full

The Mobile Technology for Health platform delivers two interrelated mobile applications in Ghana - "Mobile Midwife" and the "Client Data Application". Mobile Midwife enables pregnant women to receive pre-recorded voice messages on their mobile phones that provide time-specific pregnancy information. The Client Data Application enabled frontline health workers to use mobile phones to electronically record care given to patients and identify women and infants in their area that are due or overdue for care. In this presentation, we review data on message delivery and user response across study sites and over time from 2011-2014. Findings suggest that less than 50% of expected messages were delivered. 63% to 91% of women who received messages during pregnancy and/or postpartum were listened to; where listening is defined as having to listen to at least 50% the length of each message. Among pregnant women, almost 90% chose to listen to messages received; however, postpartum rates of active listening decline significantly over time. By thematic area, the highest interest in messages were around routine care seeking during pregnancy care and help during emergencies.

Speakers
DA

Dr. Amnesty LeFevre

Assistant Scientist, Johns Hopkins School of Public Health
Monitoring and Evaluation of digital health programs | Design and implementation of maternal newborn and child health programs in low and middle income countries | Economic evaluation


Monday May 16, 2016 14:00 - 14:45
Giraffe 211

14:00

The NetHope Academy; An ICT Student Outplacement Service
Limited Capacity full

Few, if any, technology training institutions in the developing world provide active job placement services for graduates to find their first job as they pursue their career as IT professionals. The NetHope Academy is a comprehensive program designed to give computer science students hands-on experience, soft skills and practical on-line training towards IT industry certification to commence a career in Information Technology. Combining soft skills development such as customer service training, interview skills, CV writing, etc. with certification training and practical experience prepares the students for job search and networking skills to achieve permanent job placement. Student participation and progress is measure through an on-line Learning Management System.
Through the rigorous recruitment and screening process, the program offers organizations in the public and private sector (including NGOs) and excellent recruiting service. Through internship placements, these organizations gain extensive experience with prospective employees prior to making hiring decisions.
The comprehensive NetHope Academy program playbook & implementation guide takes the implementer through detailed steps from student participant screening and recruitment to final job placement and follow-up. Over 1,200 student have successfully completed this proven program in Haiti, Egypt, Kenya, Rwanda, South Africa and elsewhere since 2011.
NetHope continues to seek partnerships with suitable ICT Educational Institutions to make the NetHope Academy available as a foundation for their student outplacement service and thereby offer differentiated services to their graduating students.
This talk will describe the program is as much detail as time allows and address questions from the audience on how it can be implemented anywhere.

Here is the link to acces and download the NetHope Academy Intern Program Playbook>>

Speakers
avatar for Fredrik Winsnes

Fredrik Winsnes

Director, Global Programs, NetHope
Fredrik Winsnes joined NetHope in 2011 and is currently responsible for the NetHope Solutions Center and the NetHope Leadership Institute . Through education and collaboration, the NetHope Solutions Center aims at assisting NetHope members and likeminded organizations to maximize their benefit from adopting enterprise technology and impactful ICT program solutions. The NetHope Leadership Institute is a professional development offering designed... Read More →



Monday May 16, 2016 14:00 - 14:45
Giraffe 201

14:00

Think Like a Designer: Putting People Before the Product
Limited Capacity full

In the next decade, more than one billion children, the largest group in history, will make the transition from adolescence into adulthood. Without the relevant skills for decent employment, many will be unable to work their way out of poverty or contribute to their country's development.

In response, Plan has designed The Youth Employment Solutions (YES) Digital Ecosystem - a suite of innovative and integrated ICT4D solutions. Going beyond 'ICT for ICTs sake', Plan embraces core principles of tech innovation to achieve greater potential for scale and sustainability, reflected in the ecosystem's Build | Measure | Learn foundations.

BUILD: The YES!ePortal builds capacity with a 'One-Stop-eShop' of data, digital tools and crowd-sharing to help practitioners develop and execute high quality interventions

MEASURE: Adopting 'big data' principles, YES!me is an M&E system to track beneficiaries for up to five years, and measure impact at individual and aggregate levels

LEARN: The YES!Academy is a digital academy for education and skill development for youth, using Gamification, User Experience Design and Massive Open Online Course principles to enhance engagement

The ecosystem increases skill development for youth employment, provides digital tools for practitioners and gathers evidence to increase intervention efficacy. It also collects relevant market data, enhances job creation and cultivates a dynamic knowledge hub for the sector.

The ecosystem is the result of meticulous design and quality collaborations, including country teams, sector partners and large-scale donors such as Accenture Development Partners and the Asian Development Bank. It is currently being rolled out across Asia, and select countries in east Africa.

Speakers
avatar for Bowden Percival

Bowden Percival

ICT for Vocational Education, Asia Regional Manager, Plan Internataional - Asia Regional Office
Sitting at the junction of technology and development, Bo Percival is a self proclaimed 'giant nerd'. Bo has worked extensively in ICT4D internationally in Education, HIV, LGBT rights, Youth Development and WASH. His current position as the Asia Regional Manager for ICT for Vocational Education at Plan, is a perfect collision of Bo's expertise and experience. Bo has a Ba. in economics and marketing, diplomas in development, interpreting and... Read More →



Monday May 16, 2016 14:00 - 14:45
Giraffe 200

14:00

Integrated Approach to Beneficiary Needs Assessment and Case Management
Limited Capacity seats available

The Syrian crisis is now in its fifth year and Jordan is hosting some 625,000 Syrians refugees – most of them arrived in Jordan in the first 2-3 years since the outbreak of the war. The vast majority of Syrian refugees – over 500,000 – are living in Jordanian cities and rural communities, outside of camps. Thanks to the generosity of the Jordanian government and its people, a substantial international and national humanitarian aid effort and the initiatives of the refugees themselves, humanitarian standards were met for most refugees. Now, five years into the crisis the capacity of Jordanian communities to host refugees has become severely stretched. Having recognized that this protracted emergency requires a different approach, humanitarian agencies are now adopting a dual response: on one hand they are focusing on strengthening the resilience of refugees and their Jordanian hosting communities and on the other hand they are increasingly focused on ensuring that assistance is delivered in an efficient and effective way and on targeting the most vulnerable of households among refugees and Jordanians in hosting communities. All this requires increased coordination and synchronization between aid organizations. To facilitate this, a UNHCR-led initiative (supported by a steering committee of major aid agencies operating in Jordan) developed a framework aimed at assessing the vulnerability of refugees: universally and for each sector – basic needs, food security, shelter, health, education and WASH. Operating in this environment is Caritas Jordan, the local partner for all Caritas sister organizations with Syrian response programs to be implemented in Jordan. Its case workers based in 10 centers across Jordan and responsible for conducting beneficiary assessment interviews had to cope with forms (mostly paper based) constantly changing subject to the international Caritas sister organization for which they were doing assessments on a particular day. The process not only lacked harmonization, consistency and objectivity across the Caritas network, but also across other agencies active in Jordan. In addition, it proved to be highly labor intensive, slow and resulted ultimately in beneficiary fatigue – as many beneficiaries needed to be interviewed soon after again in order to benefit from programs addressing other sector-specific needs. Recognizing these issues as a major constraint on its ability to implement programs effectively and efficiently Caritas Jordan supported by Caritas Switzerland is currently in the process of developing a beneficiary vulnerability and needs assessment system which will host beneficiary data on a CRM platform enabling beneficiary selection for programs and case management of beneficiaries. The first phase of the project has been completed: the development of an electronic data collection system (using tablets) to assess beneficiaries’ vulnerability – based on the UNHCR developed framework – and needs for humanitarian services as provided by the Caritas network. The developed system was tested in a trial which covered about 1,400 households reached through 5 Caritas centers across Jordan and involved some 30 Caritas case workers and Caritas volunteers. The trial concluded in early February 2016. Outcomes of the trial so far suggest the system will be able to deliver the following: * Scoring of beneficiary vulnerability in line with UNHCR standards and consistent across Caritas sister organizations and other agencies. * Scoring of vulnerable Jordanians in line and comparable with that of refugees. * Faster turnaround times – the beneficiary selection process can commence as soon as beneficiary interviewing has been completed. * Conducting holistic assessments of beneficiary needs which then enable Caritas to “pre-select” beneficiaries for programs with specific sector focus (e.g. health, education / livelihood) without further assessments. * Enhanced targeting of beneficiaries combining vulnerability scores with specific selection criteria such as household composition (e.g. number of children in certain age groups, dependency ratio, female headed households, etc.) or sector specific household situation (e.g. school aged children not attending school, household members with chronic health conditions not being managed, substandard shelter). * Advanced probing for improved accuracy of beneficiary data and case workers’ improved understanding of beneficiary situation. * Case workers being released from the responsibility of having to make subjective assessments of beneficiaries. * Overall reduced beneficiary fatigue. On the technical side, the following observations were made: * In line with growing experience of the humanitarian community, the accuracy of data was substantially improved and labor intensive paper-based data collection replaced with faster and more efficient electronic system. * Improved skips and other functions (such as piping and generation of dynamic content) proved to be key for selection of the mobile data collection and form-building platform. Without these features, more sophisticated and powerful questionnaires cannot be designed.

Speakers
avatar for Sigrid Pfaffle

Sigrid Pfaffle

M & E Specialist, MENA Region, Caritas Swiss
Sigrid Pfaffle is a specialist in monitoring & evaluation, social and market research and analysis, project planning and management within public, private sector and not-for-profit organisations. Born and brought up in Germany, Sigrid has worked - after completing a Master's degree in Business Administration - as a researcher, analyst, planner, monitoring & evaluation advisor and senior business consultant in and to major... Read More →



Monday May 16, 2016 14:00 - 14:45
Cub

14:00

The NetHope Project Reconnect - Connecting Refugees and Asylum Seekers to Online Ressources
Limited Capacity seats available

In 2015, more than one million people sought refuge in Germany, fleeing war and persecution in their home countries. Now they face new challenges: learning a new language, settling into new communities, resuming education and work.

NetHope and Google.org believe that access to Internet resources is key to connecting refugees to their new communities. With the support from Google.org, NetHope is launching Project Reconnect: an initiative providing 25,000 managed Chromebooks to nonprofit organizations supporting refugees in Germany. The project aims to help refugees as they strive to rebuild their lives, by facilitating access to education and information resources on the web.
Managed Chromebooks combined with Internet access allow refugees to access information, assistance and educational opportunities and can be used in transitional housing projects, classrooms, counseling centers, youth programs and many other situations. Here are a few ideas of projects nonprofits may consider:
- Set up a language learning center by running web-based language resources in full-screen mode.
- Provide a self-service information kiosk by securing a Chromebook in an accessible location.
- Organize children's activities with appropriate educational games.
- Enhance educational opportunities with the use of Chromebooks in classroom and training situations.
- Create an Internet cafe-like environment to allow refugees to connect with friends and family and access assistance information.
These scenarios and many more are possible with managed Chromebooks which allow organizations to provide a rich computing platform; all with minimal need for on-site IT intervention, maintenance and support.

Speakers
avatar for Isaac Kwamy

Isaac Kwamy

Global Programs Director, Disaster Preparedness and Response, NetHope
Isaac is presently the Global Programs Director of Humanitarian Operations and Disaster Management for NetHope. Isaac leads NetHope’s Global Humanitarian Operations Programs including Emergency Preparedness, Response & Recovery efforts, Crisis Informatics, Access to Information as Aid and Humanitarian Digital Financial Services (Cash programing). This includes providing leadership, oversight and execution of NetHope’s Humanitarian... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 14:00 - 14:45
Giraffe 259

14:00

The RedRose One System in DRC and Nigeria: Integrated e-Marketplaces for Improved Programming Efficiencies
Limited Capacity seats available

As the humanitarian aid sector has moved more towards choice-based provision of assistance, cash modalities have come to the forefront. While cash programming provides the benefits of flexible spending and promotes use of local market systems, new challenges have arisen about cash utilization and beneficiary tracking. Donors want assurance that funding is actually allocated to preferred types of assistance, but tracking cash use is complex. Additionally, while provision of cash is preferred, often affected locations in humanitarian crises have experienced disruptions in basic banking infrastructure. The RedRose One System provides an integrated e-marketplace platform, which can function both online and offline, and integrates beneficiary and vendor management, finance, and MEAL data on an online dashboard.

CRS in DRC launched, in October 2015, a six month emergency food assistance pilot project targeting 509 vulnerable returnee HHs near the city of Goma. The RedRose (RR) pilot aims to transfer a total of $141 to each beneficiary HH through smart cards (e-cards) using the ONEsystem RedRose platform. CRS/DRC began with a market study and, based on HHs' food preferences, 39 food commodities were integrated into the RR platform. Similarly, price data for all commodities was collected and included in the platform to avoid overcharging by vendors. The project remains flexible: based on beneficiaries' expressed needs NFIs were added to the assistance package. Commodity and NFI prices in the market are monitored weekly, which allows CRS to readjust the prices of the vendors if necessary. A post-activity monitoring tool will also be integrated in the field telephones for the RR platform.

CRS in Nigeria has utilized the RedRose One System in emergency food security programming and markets-based WASH programming, first utilizing the e-marketplace app on smartphones for vendors to makes sales to program participants who utilize smart cards, and second collecting data for pre and post intervention Knowledge, Attitudes and Practices (KAP) surveys and post distribution monitoring (PDM).

Speakers
avatar for Charles Bibuya

Charles Bibuya

Deputy MEAL/ICT4D Coordinator, CRS/DRC
He is a tenacious worker with extensive experience in Planning, Monitoring, Evaluation, Accountability and Learning (MEAL) of projects, data collection, Management and Statistical analysis, Information and Communication Technologies for Development (ICT4D). | He was able to combine his passion for MEAL and ICT4D. He is currently serve as the Deputy MEAL and ICT4D Coordinator in the DRC country program a multi-sectoral environment including... Read More →
ME

Marcelle Empey

International Development Fellow, Catholic Relief Services
Marcelle has a background in peacebuilding and monitoring and evaluation. She is currently supporting CRS/DRC’s emergency programming.
avatar for Maggie Holmesheoran

Maggie Holmesheoran

Emergency Coordinator, CRS
Maggie Holmesheoran: CRS Nigeria Yobe State Emergency Coordinator. Maggie supports all emergency programming in the northeast, including emergency food security, markets-based WASH and the CORE Group Polio Program. Maggie is an anthropologist, food and agriculture systems specialist, tech nerd and global public health practitioner. | Austin Ationg: CRS Nigeria CGPP MEAL Officer. Austin has 6 years of experience in field-based data systems... Read More →



Monday May 16, 2016 14:00 - 14:45
Giraffe 258

14:00

EcoTech Moz: Hackathons to Leverage Young Local Talent and Multi-Skilled Collaboration to Solve Challenges in Mozambique
Limited Capacity seats available

Mozambique is a country known world-wide for its vast natural resources and remarkable levels of biodiversity. However, in recent years, there has been a growing number of challenges that affect and put the country's environmental balance at risk, such as deforestation, illegal poaching, lack of environmental education, urban waste, among others.

Country policies and conventional conservation programs have been insufficient to ensure the protection of the environment and, as these challenges aggravate, Mozambique sees an urgent need for alternative and innovative means to achieve sustainable development, now and for future generations.

In light of this urgency, we have created a platform that leverages growing groups of young IT enthusiasts to focus their talent on solving some of the country's environmental issues. In the format of a hackathon - intensive working sessions to create solutions of technological base to a specific challenge - EcoTech Mozambique brings together talented IT developers and national and international experts in the areas of business development, marketing, technology and environment to create and develop whole-rounded, context-relevant and self-sustainable prototypes and/ or projects to Mozambique's environmental challenges. The solutions are then presented to decision-makers, from NGOs to donors, to public and private sector, in order to gather feedback for improvement and, in the best cases, ensure implementation.

Solutions developed so far range from: participatory waste management, illegal poaching citizen monitoring, data gathering tool for marine conservation, environmental games, to mention a few.

By creating this alternative form of developing context-relevant and market-driven solutions for environmental sustainability, we are not only coming up with successful ideas or improving existing ones, but also boosting young local talent and creativeness, the very nascent IT and entrepreneurial ecosystem in the country and establishing the missing link between environment and technology that many environmental experts and interested parties are still unaware of.

Speakers
avatar for Erika Rodrigues

Erika Rodrigues

Project Manager, UX Information Technologies
Erika Rodrigues is a community engagement specialist and project manager, currently working in Mozambique with UX Information Technologies, a local start-up focused on boosting competencies and employability of the Mozambican youth through disruptive, context-relevant and sustainable ICT solutions. Erika holds Masters' Degrees from Columbia University in New York City, in the United States and from the University of Cape Town in South Africa... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 14:00 - 14:45
Giraffe 256

14:00

Land Degradation in Somalia
Limited Capacity seats available

Following more than 20 years of civil unrest, environmental information for Southern Somalia is relatively scarce, but there are clear signs that the war economy - fuelled by the on-going conflict - is rapidly depleting the country's natural resources. Illegal wood charcoal production and export is a major activity. However, there has been little quantitative information on the extent of charcoal production due to the inaccessibility of the area and the difficulty in detecting tree loss or charcoal production sites from publicly available satellite images.

Prosopis juliflora is a fast growing tree species originating from South and Central America and with a high invasive potential in semi-arid areas around the globe. It was introduced to East Africa in the 1970's and 1980's to stabilize dune systems and to provide fuel wood after prolonged droughts and deforestation. The species has expanded rapidly and become difficult to control. It has competitive advantages over native species considering that it is extremely drought tolerant with its thorny thickets invade into drier grasslands and rangelands.

The FAO-executed Somalia Water and Land Information Management project (SWALIM) has applied advanced Remote Sensing and GIS technology to these two threats and provided specific and quantitative evidence which can now help the Somalia authorities and development partners to combat these dangers.

Speakers
avatar for James Ngochoch

James Ngochoch

GIS Officer, Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO)
Over 7 years educational and work experiences in various humanitarian, environmental and community projects within and outside Kenya. Currently working as a GIS Officer for Somalia Water and Land Information Management (SWALIM) project implemented under FAO-UN Somalia program. Possess analytical skills and experience on humanitarian and environmental resources research and management for sustainable development.



Monday May 16, 2016 14:00 - 14:45
Giraffe 257

14:00

Digital Inclusion of Young Aspirants
Limited Capacity seats available

A hundred million educated young men and women in rural India remain unemployed due to absence of marketable skills even though the country has increased its GDP significantly. In nine years Anudip has empowered over 50,000 youth for IT-enable jobs and business startups through training in IT and market-aligned job skills. This paper will present technologies that Anudip has deployed to offer blended multimedia learning in an environment of intermittent electrical power and internet in hard-to-access regions, while gearing up to increase its annual training capacity by a factor of ten.

Speakers
avatar for Dipak Basu

Dipak Basu

CEO, Anudip Foundation
Dipak Basu has spent much of his life employing technology in humanitarian missions worldwide. | | In 2006 Dipak set up Anudip Foundation, a nonprofit company dedicated to improving livelihoods of rural poor in developing countries through training in information technology and entrepreneurship. | | In 2001 Dipak founded and served for three years as Executive Director of NetHope, a technology alliance of the world's largest aid... Read More →



Monday May 16, 2016 14:00 - 14:45
Giraffe 260

14:00

SmartMatatu: Sensor Technology in Public Transport
Limited Capacity seats available

In cities across the developing world, semi-formal bus networks are critical to the local infrastructure and economy. Kenya's matatu industry is used by over 30% of the population and is valued at over $2 billion. Yet it is also a major cause of injury and death.

I will present on Echo Mobile's development and testing of SmartMatatu, a sensor-based system designed to align industry incentives, improving safety and profitability. The challenge in Kenya is that matatus are privately owned. Owners lease to drivers, but have no daily visibility into their behavior on the road. They then collect a daily fee, and drivers keep any daily earnings leftover, thereby incentivizing reckless driving to collect more fares. This threatens public safety and creates costs to owners and drivers in the form of fines, repairs, settlements, and reputational damage.

SmartMatatu provides transparency to this arrangement through a GSM-enabled sensor and a phone app that gives owners a real-time look at location, productivity, and safety; provides instant notifications when unsafe events occur; and allows mobile payments to drivers when safety improves. Working with a UC Berkeley team, Echo is conducting a RCT measuring the system's impact, collecting research data through SmartMatatu itself. In line with Echo's Day 2 talk on integrating interventions with evaluations, this project leverages new sensor tech to address a development problem, while seamlessly using that same technology to measure impact.

Speakers
avatar for Boris Maguire

Boris Maguire

Project Manager, Echo Mobile
Boris believes that flexible, low-cost, off-the-shelf platforms are the future of ICT4D. He currently manages Echo's deployment projects, helping clients from all sectors integrate Echo's platform into their business operations and development programs. He previously consulted on mobile tech in Latin America and Asia and oversaw TV and radio projects for a media development group in DC. He has an MPA in Development Practice from Columbia and a BA... Read More →



Monday May 16, 2016 14:00 - 14:45
Giraffe 261

14:00

The Role of Mobile Market Information Systems in Agricultural Development
Limited Capacity seats available

A study of the Lima Links platform in Zambia (providing price information) applying mixed methods research involving farmers and other actors related to facilitating the roll out of the tool was conducted. The research provided insight on the realistic role of ICT solutions in agricultural development considering their interaction with farmers and their environment and also explored issues of the platforms sustainability. Further the research provided insight on ICT4D interventions in Southern Africa for the academic and development community considering that information on these interventions is skew to the East African context.

Results show that the provision of efficient market information (or at least price information) can have positive effects on agricultural supply chains benefitting both farmers and traders. Up-to-date or current market information enables farmers to negotiate with traders from a position of greater strength and facilitates spatial distribution of products from rural areas to towns and between markets. In addition, quality historical market information enables farmers to make planting decisions, including those related to new crops.



Speakers
avatar for Nyamwaya Munthali

Nyamwaya Munthali

PhD Candidate/Former Project Manager ICT4D iDE Zambia, Wageningen University and Research Centre
Nyamwaya Munthali is a PhD Candidate at Wageningen University on an ICT4D project, the Environmental Virtual Observatories for Connective Action (EVOCA) Project, running for 4 years from 2016. Formerly she was a Project Manager at iDE Zambia, overseeing the roll out of Lima Links in Zambia. In this role she was involved in the design, development and launch of the product, coordinating technical development specialists with the needs of... Read More →



Monday May 16, 2016 14:00 - 14:45
Giraffe 252

14:00

Can Information + Accountability Transform Health?
Limited Capacity seats available

GOAL Uganda is implementing a randomized control trial (RCT) evaluation of an intervention designed to strengthen health service provision and citizen ownership. Central to the Accountability Can Transform Health (ACT Health) program is the development of Citizen's Report Cards (CRC) to provide information on the status of service delivery based on responses from households and health workers (confirmed with secondary source data). The CRCs are shared in interface meetings, where community members and health workers develop action plans identifying priority actions to improve health and health services. These elements are the foundation of a factorial design RCT. We distinguish the first and second processes (information and mobilization) from the third (interface meetings) to test their independent and combined impacts. The complete intervention combines all components ("information and mobilization plus interface"). This evaluation is taking place across 96 control and 282 intervention health facilities in Uganda from 2014 to 2016.

Increasingly, development interventions and public service programs are a blend of art and science. The strategic introduction of technology has great potential to creatively bridge the world of development art and implementation science. We have theories about the importance of information and communication. We also have theories about the role that technology can play. By May 2016, GOAL Uganda will have very preliminary findings from the midline evaluation of the ACT Health program. If information proves a critical component of the success of the methodology, technological innovations that reduce the cost of collecting, analyzing and storing information will be critical to scalability.

Speakers
AB

Angela Bailey

Programme Director, GOAL International Humanitarian Organisation
Angela Bailey is director of the GOAL Accountability Can Transform Health (ACT Health) program. She holds an MIA from Columbia University School of International and Public Affairs (SIPA), but has learned infinitely more about the realities and implications of accountability for service delivery in 10 years working on development programs in Africa. She is dedicated to work that creates conditions for positive change. While she has a deep passion... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 14:00 - 14:45
Giraffe 207

14:00

Implementing ICT4D in Complex Multiple Emergencies
Limited Capacity seats available

The Jonglei Food Security Program (JFSP) is a Title II program funded by United States Agency for International Development (USAID) Food for Peace (FFP) and implemented by a consortium led by Catholic Relief Services (CRS) with Save the Children International (SCI) and government stakeholders. The program is implemented in Jonglei State, South Sudan. After decades of war with The Sudan, South Sudan finally seceded and got its independence in 2011. Jonglei State, and pretty much of the whole country is characterized by poor roads, dilapidated infrastructure, lack of electricity in the grid and limited amenities. In December 2013, a political violent conflict broke out, which took an ethnic dimension in the state, diving the state where the program is run, into government and opposition controlled areas adding further challenges for implementation in an already difficult terrain. JFSP employed the use of information communication technologies (ICT) to ease on the logistics challenges associated with implementing a food security project in a conflict situation with very limited infrastructure. The program trained over 50 MEAL and program staff on using ipads for data collection on the i-formbuilder platform and has been using the technology to collect registration, monitoring and survey data on food for asset, agriculture, livestock, water and sanitation and nutrition programs. Field teams sync their data to the server as soon as they came from the field and the data would be immediately available for downloading, analysis and reporting. Use of ipads in the South Sudan context allowed JFSP to collect real time data, produce timely reports and improve efficiency in serving the conflict affected communities. It has revolutionized data collection and significantly improved data quality. The program managed to draw lessons and best practices on the use of mobile technologies in a conflict situation with limited infrastructure, which go beyond the ICT gadgets but incorporate the human element.

Speakers
avatar for Rodwell Masocha Sibanda

Rodwell Masocha Sibanda

MEAL Manager, Catholic Relief Services South Sudan
Rodwell Masocha Sibanda is a CRS Monitoring, Evaluation, Accountability and Learning (MEAL) manager and leads the USAID-funded Jonglei Food Security Program consortium MEAL department. He has been in South Sudan since 2010, and has been with the JFSP since inception in 2011. He was the leader in setting up and rolling out the JFSP ICT system before and after the 2013 crisis, having rolled out a similar system using PDAs in Zimbabwe's USAID... Read More →



Monday May 16, 2016 14:00 - 14:45
Lioness

14:00

Inclusive ICT4Peacebuilding: Capturing the Narrative of Former Combatants in Tech-Supported Peacebuilding Programs
Limited Capacity filling up

Peacebuilding, or the process by which a community engages in institution-building and other activities that increase the likelihood of lasting peace, requires the buy-in and engagement of many actors from various corners of a post-conflict society.  

Security sector reform (SSR) and disarmament, demobilization, and reintegration (DDR) are two conflict-to-peace transition  institutions  that seek to 1) decrease the number of combatants in a given country and 2) increase the likelihood that these individuals will become contributing members of  government security forces and/or  civilian communities.  

The role of ICT4D in the peacebuilding realm has evolved over the past several years to include awareness of specific vulnerabilities and needs of communities emerging from conflict. Yet,  the dialogue regarding the future of ICT for peacebuilding remains remarkably void of conversation regarding the role that former combatants and security sector actors have to  play  in peacebuilding programming.  


We present several cases that  specifically engage these often marginalized populations and demonstrate promise for future ICT for peacebuilding programs.  We ground these case studies in theoretical constructs from the peacebuilding, security, and public health literatures in order to present a practical framework for developing such inclusive and innovative programming.  

Speakers
JP

Jennifer Parkin

Methodologist and Consultant, Independent Researcher
I possess a Masters in Public Health from Indiana University, a Masters in Political Science from the University of New Mexico, and am currently a PhD Candidate in Political Science. I have completed research-intensive symposiums and institutes globally, and have experience collecting original data on the ground in countries such as Uganda, Nigeria, and Vietnam. I am passionate about evidence and developing better empirical means of obtaining the... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 14:00 - 14:45
Giraffe 206

14:00

Open Data for Efficient Governance in Developing Countries
Limited Capacity filling up

This presentation is related to a pilot initiative that is currently being implemented in Nepal. The action research explores the rationale of adopting open data practices in budgetary process to bridge the information gap between government executive agencies, parliamentarians and citizens This action research seeks to identify the data need of each of these three stakeholders, implement open data solution based on the need and document impact stories of enhanced government accountability and civic engagement.

While the research is focused on demand side, adequate effort have been put into engagement with the supply side as well to see how open data model, developed as part of the research can have sustainable impact in the long run. This research aims to explore how two distinct groups of data users - parliamentarians and local citizen intermediary organizations can use disaggregated data on budget allocation, expenditure and progress for enhanced government accountability and civic participation. At the local level, the research proposes to test innovative models of meeting data need of disconnected communities in an off-line environment.

This research represents an inquiry about open data solutions and its relation to enhanced policy making discourse at the central level and practical civic engagement strategies at the local level.

Speakers
avatar for Bibhusan Bista

Bibhusan Bista

CEO, YoungInnovations
I am the CEO and co-founder of YoungInnovations, a leading software development firm based in Nepal providing solutions to different parts of the globe. I have my background in technology, research and international development. I have led successful projects around open data, transparency accountability and other development issues. Iam an active member of IATI technical advisory group and Open Data Charter initiatives globally


Monday May 16, 2016 14:00 - 14:45
Giraffe 209

14:00

Building Inspirational Digital Products to Change the World
Limited Capacity seats available

To reach the ambition of the Sustainable Development Goals, we all need to know the extent of different problems in different places around the world. To complement the growing movements to collect and release open data about the big issues of our time, we need to deploy cutting-edge technologies to communicate that data effectively, so people can act before it's too late.

With ever-expanding datasets covering more topics and larger areas, the development sector has truly entered the age of big data. Making that data intelligible is the next big challenge to take on, which requires a combination of beautiful and intuitive design, powerful databases to complete complex analyzes and innovative visualization technologies. In an age where mobile phones are becoming the primary medium for learning about our world, we need to make sure we empower the billions of people coming online through basic phones and smartphones with the right data at the right time.

This talk will introduce how the data design agency vizzuality uses CartoDB software to build products that contribute to the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals. There will be a demonstration of projects using satellite data and cloud-computing to provide information to the 'bottom billion' through text and call-based services. From prioritizing malaria prevention efforts to helping farmers adopt more productive and sustainable practices, it's all about the right data at the right time.

Speakers
avatar for Craig Mills

Craig Mills

Chief Executive Officer, Vizzuality
Craig Mills is CEO of world-leading data design company vizzuality. He came to software development the long way round, starting off in Marine Biology and moving swiftly through GIS into data modeling and software development. Over the last decade Craig has helped build environmental applications with UN organisations, national governments, universities and NGOs from around the world, so has fantastic first hand experience of what it takes to... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 14:00 - 14:45
Giraffe 203

14:00

Building Workflows and Projects Using SMS + Integrations
Limited Capacity seats available

More and more projects and organisations are failing to achieve their key goals and deliver their project objectives due to communication problems and cost. FrontlineSMS is a tool that can reach any and everyone and can now recreate complex and bespoke workflows to save time, money and a lot of 'offline' effort.

Frontline's CTO of 3 years will lead a tech-focused presentation and demonstration of the full power of the latest FrontlineSMS app including automations, APIs, mobile money and everything in between.

Using SMS management tools allow for SMS messages to be sent, received and managed in such a way that systems can be configured to react to (in)correct answers, trigger something every Monday at 9am or Friday at 3pm, track pupils' and even teachers' progress. All in a scalable and localizable way

SMS is a low cost structured form of digital communication accessible to anyone with even the most basic of mobile phones. Common sharing of phones across families and villages means that it is often claimed that SMS has ~100% global penetration. Reaching more communities is easy only with SMS and if "access and quality cannot be decoupled" then it is a big part of the future.

FrontlineSMS as an organization has 10 years of global experience working withorganizations in the educational sector. With successful projects across Africa, Asia, Latin America and more we provide and help to utilize technology platforms across many sectors.

Speakers
avatar for Alex Pitkin

Alex Pitkin

CTO + Projects, FrontlineSMS
Alex Pitkin joined the FrontlineSMS production team in Nairobi in January 2013 as the CTO. Alex runs all areas of the production team including product development, technical design and client-side consulting helping users new and old implement projects using the Frontline suite of apps. Before running SMS-driven projects with Frontline he worked in the digital democracy space for over 9 years with experience in consultation & crowd sourcing... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 14:00 - 14:45
Giraffe 205

14:00

Connecting of the Grid Urban Populations with TV White Spaces
Limited Capacity seats available

The digital divide is extreme in Africa. At Microsoft, we have been investigating various technologies to bridge this divide. In this session we will discuss our research around the TV White Spaces, the technology behind dynamic spectrum and how we have leveraged it, and worked with our partners to connect communities in Kenya, Tanzania, Ghana, Botswana, Namibia and South Africa.

Speakers
avatar for Frank McCosker

Frank McCosker

Director of Strategic Partnerships, Microsoft
Frank McCosker is General Manager of Affordable Access and Smart Financing in Microsoft’s 4Afrika Initiatives. He is responsible for designing and implementing affordable access projects in many countries on the African continent utilizing new technologies including TV White Spaces and dynamic spectrum allocation. He is also finding new and smart ways to make access to finance more affordable for the ICT ecosystem in African... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 14:00 - 14:45
Giraffe 202

14:00

Monitoring of SDGs with Example on Use of Mobile Water Quality Testing Tools
Limited Capacity seats available

In the late 1990's the United Nations created the MDGs to reinvigorate the international development sector around a number of big ideas, such as eradicating poverty and improving global health. The truth about their actual impact is more complex. There are many critics of them, especially focused on the way they were created (top down), if they had any impact (would have happened regardless of aid interventions), and the methodology and implementation (unattainable targets, unreliable data). At the time of the creation of the MDGs many of the IT technologies that we have today did not exist yet. The most important technology of all is probably the mobile phone. With the newly setup SDGs we now live in a world where IT technologies offer endless new possibilities. These technologies can especially help in more effectively keeping track of the progress being made, including monitoring of the SDGs. It is actually now possible to track a near 'real-time' what is happening on the ground.

At Akvo we create open source, internet and mobile software and sensors. We focus on making international development and country governance more effective, transparent and collaborative. We help our partners act to improve the management of water, sanitation, agriculture, health, energy, education and the environment. Our tools will also help in more effective monitoring of the SDGs.

Two examples of on-going global trends include From paper data collection to digital data collection (Akvo FLOW) and decentralized mobile water quality testing (Akvo Caddisfly).

A deeper dive into monitoring of the SDG Indicator 6.1.1: Percentage of population using safely managed drinking water services

"Method of computation: Household surveys and censuses currently provide information on types of basic drinking water sources listed above, and also indicate if sources are on premises. These data sources often have information on the availability of water and increasingly on the quality of water at the household level, through direct testing of drinking water for fecal or chemical contamination."

To ensure sustainable development for water, among other things we have to achieve safely managed drinking water services. There is only one way to do this in decentralized water systems, such as with rural water supply, but also within many urban situations, and that is to have decentralized water quality testing systems in place. Akvo's new and innovative water quality testing solutions provide easy to perform field screening tests, directly coupled to our large scale and proven field data collection system, Akvo FLOW.

Speakers
avatar for Luuk Diphoorn

Luuk Diphoorn

Manager East Africa Hub, Akvo.org
Luuk Diphoorn is Manager of Akvo's East Africa Hub Luuk leads Akvo's project activities with all our partners in East and Southern Africa, and steers the expansion of our hub in Nairobi, Kenya.



Monday May 16, 2016 14:00 - 14:45
Giraffe 204

14:45

Farmbook Suite: Applying ICT in Agroenterprise for Smallholders
Limited Capacity full

Farmbook Suite is a set of ICT tools for smallholder agroenterprise support comprised of three components: Map& Track, eLearning, and Business Planner. Map & Track, a GIS-based mapping and tracking system, assists in recording services delivered and management of farmer groups for value chain operations. The e-Learning component provides a delivery method of SMART Skills courses ( including topics that assist farmers to improve income and manage natural resources) to Field Agents who train farmer groups. The third component, Business Planner, functions to build business plans, assess production costs and profitability of products. The data collected may be collected offline and then synced to a database with a reporting system to generate information for farmers, field agents, market facilitators and buyers.

Speakers
avatar for Sydney Khando

Sydney Khando

Senior Programme Manager Agriculture Livelihoods, Catholic Relief services
Sydney Khando is the Senior Programme Manager Agriculture Livelihoods for the Catholic Relief Services Malawi Country Programme. As a holder of Bachelor of Science Degree majoring in Agriculture from the University of Malawi, he has worked in various capacities in the Agricultural Sector in Sothern Africa both in Malawi and in South Africa. Other than the Bachelor of Science Agriculture he has other post graduate certificates in project... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Kim Tungate

Dr. Kim Tungate

Sr Tech Advisor, CRS
Kim Tungate is an Agroenterprise Advisor for CRS. She has more than 20 years of experience in the agriculture sector. Prior to her work with CRS she worked at North Carolina State University for close to 10 years as: an Innovative Crops Program Manager and as an Agriculture Extenstion Agent for commodity, horticulture and livestock crops. Kim was also a Deputy Chief of Party for the AAAP project at Kabul University. Kim received her PhD from... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 14:45 - 15:30
Giraffe 253

14:45

Plantwise: Sharing Plant Health Knowledge via ICTs
Limited Capacity seats available

Plantwise is a global programme, led by CABI, which provides farmers with the plant health knowledge they need to lose less of what they grow in order to increase food security and improve rural livelihoods. Plantwise has championed the use of ICTs over the past few years. We train our plant doctors using the PW Plant Doctor Simulator, to ensure that they are able to correctly identify pests and suggest the appropriate management solution to farmers. Together with our partners, we have piloted the introduction of SIM-equipped Android tablets at plant clinics and monitoring their impact.

Plant doctors are encouraged to use the PW Factsheet Library app to access the Plantwise Knowledge Bank (which contains over 10,000 factsheets covering 4,000 plants and 2,500 pests) and provide accurate diagnoses even when offline. The tablets also allow plant doctors to communicate with each other as well as national and international diagnostic experts via instant messaging services.

When a farmer visits a local plant clinic, their details and the diagnosis and treatment advice are all logged using an online management system. This allows Plantwise to monitor the doctors' recommendations to ensure they are accurate and comply with best practice. It also allows us to provide the clinic data to plant protection agencies and researchers, enabling them to track outbreaks of new crop pests and analyze their spread close to real time.

This presentation will be accompanied by an interactive exhibit.

Speakers
avatar for Dr. Washington Otieno

Dr. Washington Otieno

Plantwise Programme Executive, CABI
Dr Otieno has over 25 years' experience in agricultural research and development, specializing in plant protection and agricultural biosecurity. Over the past 10 years he has engaged in a number of initiatives that support improving plant health systems of developing countries, including several national organizations in Kenya, USAID and the Secretariat of the IPPC. In 2013 he joined CABI as the Plantwise Programme Regional Coordinator for... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 14:45 - 15:30
Giraffe 255

14:45

The Data Revolution: The Path to Global Food Security
Limited Capacity full

In this presentation, the Global Open Data Initiative will demonstrate practical examples where low to high tech applications using open data is providing significant benefits to farmers and consumers alike, and will play a key role helping the world achieve SDG2 in particular, with a world both better fed and wealthier

Speakers
avatar for Andre Laperriere

Andre Laperriere

Executive Director, GODAN Secretariat
Mr. André Laperriere joined the Global Open Data Initiative on Agriculture and Nutrition (GODAN) as its first Executive Director, in September 2015. During his career, Mr. Laperriere has led/managed numerous projects on behalf of large Private Corporations and subsequently, within the United Nations and the World Bank. In this context he played a senior role in the design and the implementation of major reforms within a number of... Read More →


ICT4D pdf

Monday May 16, 2016 14:45 - 15:30
Giraffe 254

14:45

Designing a Mobile Partograph for Safer Maternal Deliveries
Limited Capacity seats available

Prolonged and obstructed labor is one of the leading causes of maternal and newborn mortality. The partograph, a one-page paper form, has been universally recommended by WHO since 1994 as an effective tool for the early detection of complications during labor, thereby reducing prolonged labor, intrapartum stillbirths, and emergency caesarean sections. While it has been hailed as a highly effective, low-cost method of reducing maternal and fetal mortality, the adoption of the partograph remains low in low-resource settings despite decades of training and investment. Health providers find the graph format and its instructions too complex to follow.

To address these challenges, Dimagi developed a mobile application version of the partograph, called "mLabour," built on Dimagi's mHealth platform, CommCare. Designed to significantly reduce health workers' workload, mLabour - piloted in India in early 2015 at the Abdul Hakeem Centenary Hospital - features built-in clinical protocols that detect and manage abnormal labor progress, automatic graphing, reminders to conduct timely patient exams, messaging capabilities to notify staff of emergency cases, and web-based reports for supervisors and administrators. Initial results showed a reduction in the number of patients who were neglected (100% births had a mobile partograph completed, compared to 12.5% on paper) and in follow-up time.

In this presentation, Dimagi's Carla Legros will describe the process of designing and developing the mLabour application and present the evaluation methodologies and results that came out of the pilot. Participants will learn about the unique challenges and considerations that come with designing and piloting ICT tools for intrapartum care in low-resource clinical settings.

Speakers
avatar for Carla Legros

Carla Legros

Project Manager, Dimagi
Carla Legros is a Project Manager at Dimagi and has worked on over 10 ICT4D projects in Africa, developing and supporting clients in launch mobile tools for health services. Primarily her work has been in nutrition, designing applications to screen, treat and provide recommendations for malnourished pregnant women and children under five years old. One such application, launched in 4 countries in Africa, screened over 10,000 target... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 14:45 - 15:30
Giraffe 208

14:45

Making mHealth Solutions Count in DCs amidst Challenges
Limited Capacity seats available

World Vision's AIM Health project funded by Irish Aid through the Ireland office uses the timed and targeted Counseling (ttC) strategy through a MoTECH suite enabled mHealth application to improve maternal and newborn and child health. The mHealth project with support from World Vision US has outfitted CHWs with MoTECH suite ttC application enabled s devices to address MNCH issues in the project catchment area. The scale of the mHealth deployment is one of the largest in Uganda with over 896 CHWs. Results forthcoming overtime are indicative of the good progress and potential impact of the solution as an efficient, quality guaranteeing resource for community health system strengthening.
At this forum we shall share with the august audience the structural and infrastructural challenges and looming gaps encountered in piloting and rolling out an ICT4D mHealth intervention and how we have managed to harness result amidst these challenges. We will share success and what this success looks like in the face ideal ICT4D implementation logic. We will delve into resourcing and planning needs, stakeholder engagements with MoH and other partners to address alignment to national strategy and systematic and strategic integration for sustainability including other opportunities for scaling. We will share practices adopted and adapted at nation level to guarantee results as we seek to use this opportunity to learn from the wealth of knowledge present at the forum.

Speakers
avatar for Joel Fred Nsumba

Joel Fred Nsumba

mHealth Coordinator, World Vision Uganda
Joel Fred Nsumba is the mHealth Coordinator at world Vision Uganda. He has over 9 year experience in Statistical Computing, Health, women and child programming and implementation, monitoring and evaluation. Over the years, Joel has garnered lots of experience in implementing, Monitoring and Evaluation of ICT4D interventions. He is among the brains behind the implementation of the mHealth interventions in World Vision Uganda office, ensuring that... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 14:45 - 15:30
Giraffe 210

14:45

Mobile Technology for Health in Ghana (MOTECH): Overview of Platform Message Delivery and User Response
Limited Capacity full

The Mobile Technology for Health platform delivers two interrelated mobile applications in Ghana - "Mobile Midwife" and the "Client Data Application". Mobile Midwife enables pregnant women to receive pre-recorded voice messages on their mobile phones that provide time-specific pregnancy information. The Client Data Application enabled frontline health workers to use mobile phones to electronically record care given to patients and identify women and infants in their area that are due or overdue for care. In this presentation, we review data on message delivery and user response across study sites and over time from 2011-2014. Findings suggest that less than 50% of expected messages were delivered. 63% to 91% of women who received messages during pregnancy and/or postpartum were listened to; where listening is defined as having to listen to at least 50% the length of each message. Among pregnant women, almost 90% chose to listen to messages received; however, postpartum rates of active listening decline significantly over time. By thematic area, the highest interest in messages were around routine care seeking during pregnancy care and help during emergencies.

Speakers
DA

Dr. Amnesty LeFevre

Assistant Scientist, Johns Hopkins School of Public Health
Monitoring and Evaluation of digital health programs | Design and implementation of maternal newborn and child health programs in low and middle income countries | Economic evaluation


Monday May 16, 2016 14:45 - 15:30
Giraffe 211

14:45

The NetHope Academy; An ICT Student Outplacement Service
Limited Capacity filling up

Few, if any, technology training institutions in the developing world provide active job placement services for graduates to find their first job as they pursue their career as IT professionals. The NetHope Academy is a comprehensive program designed to give computer science students hands-on experience, soft skills and practical on-line training towards IT industry certification to commence a career in Information Technology. Combining soft skills development such as customer service training, interview skills, CV writing, etc. with certification training and practical experience prepares the students for job search and networking skills to achieve permanent job placement. Student participation and progress is measure through an on-line Learning Management System.
Through the rigorous recruitment and screening process, the program offers organizations in the public and private sector (including NGOs) and excellent recruiting service. Through internship placements, these organizations gain extensive experience with prospective employees prior to making hiring decisions.
The comprehensive NetHope Academy program playbook & implementation guide takes the implementer through detailed steps from student participant screening and recruitment to final job placement and follow-up. Over 1,200 student have successfully completed this proven program in Haiti, Egypt, Kenya, Rwanda, South Africa and elsewhere since 2011.
NetHope continues to seek partnerships with suitable ICT Educational Institutions to make the NetHope Academy available as a foundation for their student outplacement service and thereby offer differentiated services to their graduating students.
This talk will describe the program is as much detail as time allows and address questions from the audience on how it can be implemented anywhere.

Here is the link to acces and download the NetHope Academy Intern Program Playbook>>

Speakers
avatar for Fredrik Winsnes

Fredrik Winsnes

Director, Global Programs, NetHope
Fredrik Winsnes joined NetHope in 2011 and is currently responsible for the NetHope Solutions Center and the NetHope Leadership Institute . Through education and collaboration, the NetHope Solutions Center aims at assisting NetHope members and likeminded organizations to maximize their benefit from adopting enterprise technology and impactful ICT program solutions. The NetHope Leadership Institute is a professional development offering designed... Read More →



Monday May 16, 2016 14:45 - 15:30
Giraffe 201

14:45

Think Like a Designer: Putting People Before the Product
Limited Capacity full

In the next decade, more than one billion children, the largest group in history, will make the transition from adolescence into adulthood. Without the relevant skills for decent employment, many will be unable to work their way out of poverty or contribute to their country's development.

In response, Plan has designed The Youth Employment Solutions (YES) Digital Ecosystem - a suite of innovative and integrated ICT4D solutions. Going beyond 'ICT for ICTs sake', Plan embraces core principles of tech innovation to achieve greater potential for scale and sustainability, reflected in the ecosystem's Build | Measure | Learn foundations.

BUILD: The YES!ePortal builds capacity with a 'One-Stop-eShop' of data, digital tools and crowd-sharing to help practitioners develop and execute high quality interventions

MEASURE: Adopting 'big data' principles, YES!me is an M&E system to track beneficiaries for up to five years, and measure impact at individual and aggregate levels

LEARN: The YES!Academy is a digital academy for education and skill development for youth, using Gamification, User Experience Design and Massive Open Online Course principles to enhance engagement

The ecosystem increases skill development for youth employment, provides digital tools for practitioners and gathers evidence to increase intervention efficacy. It also collects relevant market data, enhances job creation and cultivates a dynamic knowledge hub for the sector.

The ecosystem is the result of meticulous design and quality collaborations, including country teams, sector partners and large-scale donors such as Accenture Development Partners and the Asian Development Bank. It is currently being rolled out across Asia, and select countries in east Africa.

Speakers
avatar for Bowden Percival

Bowden Percival

ICT for Vocational Education, Asia Regional Manager, Plan Internataional - Asia Regional Office
Sitting at the junction of technology and development, Bo Percival is a self proclaimed 'giant nerd'. Bo has worked extensively in ICT4D internationally in Education, HIV, LGBT rights, Youth Development and WASH. His current position as the Asia Regional Manager for ICT for Vocational Education at Plan, is a perfect collision of Bo's expertise and experience. Bo has a Ba. in economics and marketing, diplomas in development, interpreting and... Read More →



Monday May 16, 2016 14:45 - 15:30
Giraffe 200

14:45

Integrated Approach to Beneficiary Needs Assessment and Case Management
Limited Capacity seats available

The Syrian crisis is now in its fifth year and Jordan is hosting some 625,000 Syrians refugees – most of them arrived in Jordan in the first 2-3 years since the outbreak of the war. The vast majority of Syrian refugees – over 500,000 – are living in Jordanian cities and rural communities, outside of camps. Thanks to the generosity of the Jordanian government and its people, a substantial international and national humanitarian aid effort and the initiatives of the refugees themselves, humanitarian standards were met for most refugees. Now, five years into the crisis the capacity of Jordanian communities to host refugees has become severely stretched. Having recognized that this protracted emergency requires a different approach, humanitarian agencies are now adopting a dual response: on one hand they are focusing on strengthening the resilience of refugees and their Jordanian hosting communities and on the other hand they are increasingly focused on ensuring that assistance is delivered in an efficient and effective way and on targeting the most vulnerable of households among refugees and Jordanians in hosting communities. All this requires increased coordination and synchronization between aid organizations. To facilitate this, a UNHCR-led initiative (supported by a steering committee of major aid agencies operating in Jordan) developed a framework aimed at assessing the vulnerability of refugees: universally and for each sector – basic needs, food security, shelter, health, education and WASH. Operating in this environment is Caritas Jordan, the local partner for all Caritas sister organizations with Syrian response programs to be implemented in Jordan. Its case workers based in 10 centers across Jordan and responsible for conducting beneficiary assessment interviews had to cope with forms (mostly paper based) constantly changing subject to the international Caritas sister organization for which they were doing assessments on a particular day. The process not only lacked harmonization, consistency and objectivity across the Caritas network, but also across other agencies active in Jordan. In addition, it proved to be highly labor intensive, slow and resulted ultimately in beneficiary fatigue – as many beneficiaries needed to be interviewed soon after again in order to benefit from programs addressing other sector-specific needs. Recognizing these issues as a major constraint on its ability to implement programs effectively and efficiently Caritas Jordan supported by Caritas Switzerland is currently in the process of developing a beneficiary vulnerability and needs assessment system which will host beneficiary data on a CRM platform enabling beneficiary selection for programs and case management of beneficiaries. The first phase of the project has been completed: the development of an electronic data collection system (using tablets) to assess beneficiaries’ vulnerability – based on the UNHCR developed framework – and needs for humanitarian services as provided by the Caritas network. The developed system was tested in a trial which covered about 1,400 households reached through 5 Caritas centers across Jordan and involved some 30 Caritas case workers and Caritas volunteers. The trial concluded in early February 2016. Outcomes of the trial so far suggest the system will be able to deliver the following: * Scoring of beneficiary vulnerability in line with UNHCR standards and consistent across Caritas sister organizations and other agencies. * Scoring of vulnerable Jordanians in line and comparable with that of refugees. * Faster turnaround times – the beneficiary selection process can commence as soon as beneficiary interviewing has been completed. * Conducting holistic assessments of beneficiary needs which then enable Caritas to “pre-select” beneficiaries for programs with specific sector focus (e.g. health, education / livelihood) without further assessments. * Enhanced targeting of beneficiaries combining vulnerability scores with specific selection criteria such as household composition (e.g. number of children in certain age groups, dependency ratio, female headed households, etc.) or sector specific household situation (e.g. school aged children not attending school, household members with chronic health conditions not being managed, substandard shelter). * Advanced probing for improved accuracy of beneficiary data and case workers’ improved understanding of beneficiary situation. * Case workers being released from the responsibility of having to make subjective assessments of beneficiaries. * Overall reduced beneficiary fatigue. On the technical side, the following observations were made: * In line with growing experience of the humanitarian community, the accuracy of data was substantially improved and labor intensive paper-based data collection replaced with faster and more efficient electronic system. * Improved skips and other functions (such as piping and generation of dynamic content) proved to be key for selection of the mobile data collection and form-building platform. Without these features, more sophisticated and powerful questionnaires cannot be designed.

Speakers
avatar for Sigrid Pfaffle

Sigrid Pfaffle

M & E Specialist, MENA Region, Caritas Swiss
Sigrid Pfaffle is a specialist in monitoring & evaluation, social and market research and analysis, project planning and management within public, private sector and not-for-profit organisations. Born and brought up in Germany, Sigrid has worked - after completing a Master's degree in Business Administration - as a researcher, analyst, planner, monitoring & evaluation advisor and senior business consultant in and to major... Read More →



Monday May 16, 2016 14:45 - 15:30
Cub

14:45

The NetHope Project Reconnect - Connecting Refugees and Asylum Seekers to Online Ressources
Limited Capacity full

In 2015, more than one million people sought refuge in Germany, fleeing war and persecution in their home countries. Now they face new challenges: learning a new language, settling into new communities, resuming education and work.

NetHope and Google.org believe that access to Internet resources is key to connecting refugees to their new communities. With the support from Google.org, NetHope is launching Project Reconnect: an initiative providing 25,000 managed Chromebooks to nonprofit organizations supporting refugees in Germany. The project aims to help refugees as they strive to rebuild their lives, by facilitating access to education and information resources on the web.
Managed Chromebooks combined with Internet access allow refugees to access information, assistance and educational opportunities and can be used in transitional housing projects, classrooms, counseling centers, youth programs and many other situations. Here are a few ideas of projects nonprofits may consider:
- Set up a language learning center by running web-based language resources in full-screen mode.
- Provide a self-service information kiosk by securing a Chromebook in an accessible location.
- Organize children's activities with appropriate educational games.
- Enhance educational opportunities with the use of Chromebooks in classroom and training situations.
- Create an Internet cafe-like environment to allow refugees to connect with friends and family and access assistance information.
These scenarios and many more are possible with managed Chromebooks which allow organizations to provide a rich computing platform; all with minimal need for on-site IT intervention, maintenance and support.

Speakers
avatar for Isaac Kwamy

Isaac Kwamy

Global Programs Director, Disaster Preparedness and Response, NetHope
Isaac is presently the Global Programs Director of Humanitarian Operations and Disaster Management for NetHope. Isaac leads NetHope’s Global Humanitarian Operations Programs including Emergency Preparedness, Response & Recovery efforts, Crisis Informatics, Access to Information as Aid and Humanitarian Digital Financial Services (Cash programing). This includes providing leadership, oversight and execution of NetHope’s Humanitarian... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 14:45 - 15:30
Giraffe 259

14:45

EcoTech Moz: Hackathons to Leverage Young Local Talent and Multi-Skilled Collaboration to Solve Challenges in Mozambique
Limited Capacity seats available

Mozambique is a country known world-wide for its vast natural resources and remarkable levels of biodiversity. However, in recent years, there has been a growing number of challenges that affect and put the country's environmental balance at risk, such as deforestation, illegal poaching, lack of environmental education, urban waste, among others.

Country policies and conventional conservation programs have been insufficient to ensure the protection of the environment and, as these challenges aggravate, Mozambique sees an urgent need for alternative and innovative means to achieve sustainable development, now and for future generations.

In light of this urgency, we have created a platform that leverages growing groups of young IT enthusiasts to focus their talent on solving some of the country's environmental issues. In the format of a hackathon - intensive working sessions to create solutions of technological base to a specific challenge - EcoTech Mozambique brings together talented IT developers and national and international experts in the areas of business development, marketing, technology and environment to create and develop whole-rounded, context-relevant and self-sustainable prototypes and/ or projects to Mozambique's environmental challenges. The solutions are then presented to decision-makers, from NGOs to donors, to public and private sector, in order to gather feedback for improvement and, in the best cases, ensure implementation.

Solutions developed so far range from: participatory waste management, illegal poaching citizen monitoring, data gathering tool for marine conservation, environmental games, to mention a few.

By creating this alternative form of developing context-relevant and market-driven solutions for environmental sustainability, we are not only coming up with successful ideas or improving existing ones, but also boosting young local talent and creativeness, the very nascent IT and entrepreneurial ecosystem in the country and establishing the missing link between environment and technology that many environmental experts and interested parties are still unaware of.

Speakers
avatar for Erika Rodrigues

Erika Rodrigues

Project Manager, UX Information Technologies
Erika Rodrigues is a community engagement specialist and project manager, currently working in Mozambique with UX Information Technologies, a local start-up focused on boosting competencies and employability of the Mozambican youth through disruptive, context-relevant and sustainable ICT solutions. Erika holds Masters' Degrees from Columbia University in New York City, in the United States and from the University of Cape Town in South Africa... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 14:45 - 15:30
Giraffe 256

14:45

Land Degradation in Somalia
Limited Capacity seats available

Following more than 20 years of civil unrest, environmental information for Southern Somalia is relatively scarce, but there are clear signs that the war economy - fuelled by the on-going conflict - is rapidly depleting the country's natural resources. Illegal wood charcoal production and export is a major activity. However, there has been little quantitative information on the extent of charcoal production due to the inaccessibility of the area and the difficulty in detecting tree loss or charcoal production sites from publicly available satellite images.

Prosopis juliflora is a fast growing tree species originating from South and Central America and with a high invasive potential in semi-arid areas around the globe. It was introduced to East Africa in the 1970's and 1980's to stabilize dune systems and to provide fuel wood after prolonged droughts and deforestation. The species has expanded rapidly and become difficult to control. It has competitive advantages over native species considering that it is extremely drought tolerant with its thorny thickets invade into drier grasslands and rangelands.

The FAO-executed Somalia Water and Land Information Management project (SWALIM) has applied advanced Remote Sensing and GIS technology to these two threats and provided specific and quantitative evidence which can now help the Somalia authorities and development partners to combat these dangers.

Speakers
avatar for James Ngochoch

James Ngochoch

GIS Officer, Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO)
Over 7 years educational and work experiences in various humanitarian, environmental and community projects within and outside Kenya. Currently working as a GIS Officer for Somalia Water and Land Information Management (SWALIM) project implemented under FAO-UN Somalia program. Possess analytical skills and experience on humanitarian and environmental resources research and management for sustainable development.


Monday May 16, 2016 14:45 - 15:30
Giraffe 257

14:45

Digital Inclusion of Young Aspirants
Limited Capacity seats available

A hundred million educated young men and women in rural India remain unemployed due to absence of marketable skills even though the country has increased its GDP significantly. In nine years Anudip has empowered over 50,000 youth for IT-enable jobs and business startups through training in IT and market-aligned job skills. This paper will present technologies that Anudip has deployed to offer blended multimedia learning in an environment of intermittent electrical power and internet in hard-to-access regions, while gearing up to increase its annual training capacity by a factor of ten.

Speakers
avatar for Dipak Basu

Dipak Basu

CEO, Anudip Foundation
Dipak Basu has spent much of his life employing technology in humanitarian missions worldwide. | | In 2006 Dipak set up Anudip Foundation, a nonprofit company dedicated to improving livelihoods of rural poor in developing countries through training in information technology and entrepreneurship. | | In 2001 Dipak founded and served for three years as Executive Director of NetHope, a technology alliance of the world's largest aid... Read More →



Monday May 16, 2016 14:45 - 15:30
Giraffe 260

14:45

SmartMatatu: Sensor Technology in Public Transport
Limited Capacity seats available

In cities across the developing world, semi-formal bus networks are critical to the local infrastructure and economy. Kenya's matatu industry is used by over 30% of the population and is valued at over $2 billion. Yet it is also a major cause of injury and death.

I will present on Echo Mobile's development and testing of SmartMatatu, a sensor-based system designed to align industry incentives, improving safety and profitability. The challenge in Kenya is that matatus are privately owned. Owners lease to drivers, but have no daily visibility into their behavior on the road. They then collect a daily fee, and drivers keep any daily earnings leftover, thereby incentivizing reckless driving to collect more fares. This threatens public safety and creates costs to owners and drivers in the form of fines, repairs, settlements, and reputational damage.

SmartMatatu provides transparency to this arrangement through a GSM-enabled sensor and a phone app that gives owners a real-time look at location, productivity, and safety; provides instant notifications when unsafe events occur; and allows mobile payments to drivers when safety improves. Working with a UC Berkeley team, Echo is conducting a RCT measuring the system's impact, collecting research data through SmartMatatu itself. In line with Echo's Day 2 talk on integrating interventions with evaluations, this project leverages new sensor tech to address a development problem, while seamlessly using that same technology to measure impact.

Speakers
avatar for Boris Maguire

Boris Maguire

Project Manager, Echo Mobile
Boris believes that flexible, low-cost, off-the-shelf platforms are the future of ICT4D. He currently manages Echo's deployment projects, helping clients from all sectors integrate Echo's platform into their business operations and development programs. He previously consulted on mobile tech in Latin America and Asia and oversaw TV and radio projects for a media development group in DC. He has an MPA in Development Practice from Columbia and a BA... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 14:45 - 15:30
Giraffe 261

14:45

The Role of Mobile Market Information Systems in Agricultural Development
Limited Capacity seats available

A case study of the Lima Links platform in Zambia (providing price information) applying ethnographic and in- depth interviews with farmers and other actors related to facilitating the roll out of the tool was conducted. The research provided insight on the realistic role of ICT solutions in agricultural development considering their interaction with farmers and their environment and also explored issues of the platforms sustainability. Further the research provided insight on ICT4D interventions in Southern Africa for the academic and development community considering that information on these interventions is skew to the East African context.

Results show that the provision of efficient market information (or at least price information) can have positive effects on agricultural supply chains benefitting both farmers and traders. Up-to-date or current market information enables farmers to negotiate with traders from a position of greater strength and facilitates spatial distribution of products from rural areas to towns and between markets. In addition, quality historical market information enables farmers to make planting decisions, including those related to new crops. It also permits traders to make better decisions regarding the viability of intra- and, perhaps, inter-seasonal storage.


Speakers
avatar for Nyamwaya Munthali

Nyamwaya Munthali

PhD Candidate/Former Project Manager ICT4D iDE Zambia, Wageningen University and Research Centre
Nyamwaya Munthali is a PhD Candidate at Wageningen University on an ICT4D project, the Environmental Virtual Observatories for Connective Action (EVOCA) Project, running for 4 years from 2016. Formerly she was a Project Manager at iDE Zambia, overseeing the roll out of Lima Links in Zambia. In this role she was involved in the design, development and launch of the product, coordinating technical development specialists with the needs of... Read More →



Monday May 16, 2016 14:45 - 15:30
Giraffe 252

14:45

Can Information + Accountability Transform Health?
Limited Capacity seats available

GOAL Uganda is implementing a randomized control trial (RCT) evaluation of an intervention designed to strengthen health service provision and citizen ownership. Central to the Accountability Can Transform Health (ACT Health) program is the development of Citizen's Report Cards (CRC) to provide information on the status of service delivery based on responses from households and health workers (confirmed with secondary source data). The CRCs are shared in interface meetings, where community members and health workers develop action plans identifying priority actions to improve health and health services. These elements are the foundation of a factorial design RCT. We distinguish the first and second processes (information and mobilization) from the third (interface meetings) to test their independent and combined impacts. The complete intervention combines all components ("information and mobilization plus interface"). This evaluation is taking place across 96 control and 282 intervention health facilities in Uganda from 2014 to 2016.

Increasingly, development interventions and public service programs are a blend of art and science. The strategic introduction of technology has great potential to creatively bridge the world of development art and implementation science. We have theories about the importance of information and communication. We also have theories about the role that technology can play. By May 2016, GOAL Uganda will have very preliminary findings from the midline evaluation of the ACT Health program. If information proves a critical component of the success of the methodology, technological innovations that reduce the cost of collecting, analyzing and storing information will be critical to scalability.

Speakers
AB

Angela Bailey

Programme Director, GOAL International Humanitarian Organisation
Angela Bailey is director of the GOAL Accountability Can Transform Health (ACT Health) program. She holds an MIA from Columbia University School of International and Public Affairs (SIPA), but has learned infinitely more about the realities and implications of accountability for service delivery in 10 years working on development programs in Africa. She is dedicated to work that creates conditions for positive change. While she has a deep passion... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 14:45 - 15:30
Giraffe 207

14:45

Implementing ICT4D in Complex Multiple Emergencies
Limited Capacity seats available

The Jonglei Food Security Program (JFSP) is a Title II program funded by United States Agency for International Development (USAID) Food for Peace (FFP) and implemented by a consortium led by Catholic Relief Services (CRS) with Save the Children International (SCI) and government stakeholders. The program is implemented in Jonglei State, South Sudan. After decades of war with The Sudan, South Sudan finally seceded and got its independence in 2011. Jonglei State, and pretty much of the whole country is characterized by poor roads, dilapidated infrastructure, lack of electricity in the grid and limited amenities. In December 2013, a political violent conflict broke out, which took an ethnic dimension in the state, diving the state where the program is run, into government and opposition controlled areas adding further challenges for implementation in an already difficult terrain. JFSP employed the use of information communication technologies (ICT) to ease on the logistics challenges associated with implementing a food security project in a conflict situation with very limited infrastructure. The program trained over 50 MEAL and program staff on using ipads for data collection on the i-formbuilder platform and has been using the technology to collect registration, monitoring and survey data on food for asset, agriculture, livestock, water and sanitation and nutrition programs. Field teams sync their data to the server as soon as they came from the field and the data would be immediately available for downloading, analysis and reporting. Use of ipads in the South Sudan context allowed JFSP to collect real time data, produce timely reports and improve efficiency in serving the conflict affected communities. It has revolutionized data collection and significantly improved data quality. The program managed to draw lessons and best practices on the use of mobile technologies in a conflict situation with limited infrastructure, which go beyond the ICT gadgets but incorporate the human element.

Speakers
avatar for Rodwell Masocha Sibanda

Rodwell Masocha Sibanda

MEAL Manager, Catholic Relief Services South Sudan
Rodwell Masocha Sibanda is a CRS Monitoring, Evaluation, Accountability and Learning (MEAL) manager and leads the USAID-funded Jonglei Food Security Program consortium MEAL department. He has been in South Sudan since 2010, and has been with the JFSP since inception in 2011. He was the leader in setting up and rolling out the JFSP ICT system before and after the 2013 crisis, having rolled out a similar system using PDAs in Zimbabwe's USAID... Read More →



Monday May 16, 2016 14:45 - 15:30
Lioness

14:45

Inclusive ICT4Peacebuilding: Capturing the Narrative of Former Combatants in Tech-Supported Peacebuilding Programs
Limited Capacity seats available

Peacebuilding, or the process by which a community engages in institution-building and other activities that increase the likelihood of lasting peace, requires the buy-in and engagement of many actors from various corners of a post-conflict society.  

Security sector reform (SSR) and disarmament, demobilization, and reintegration (DDR) are two conflict-to-peace transition  institutions  that seek to 1) decrease the number of combatants in a given country and 2) increase the likelihood that these individuals will become contributing members of  government security forces and/or  civilian communities.  

The role of ICT4D in the peacebuilding realm has evolved over the past several years to include awareness of specific vulnerabilities and needs of communities emerging from conflict. Yet,  the dialogue regarding the future of ICT for peacebuilding remains remarkably void of conversation regarding the role that former combatants and security sector actors have to  play  in peacebuilding programming.  


We present several cases that  specifically engage these often marginalized populations and demonstrate promise for future ICT for peacebuilding programs.  We ground these case studies in theoretical constructs from the peacebuilding, security, and public health literatures in order to present a practical framework for developing such inclusive and innovative programming.  

Speakers
JP

Jennifer Parkin

Methodologist and Consultant, Independent Researcher
I possess a Masters in Public Health from Indiana University, a Masters in Political Science from the University of New Mexico, and am currently a PhD Candidate in Political Science. I have completed research-intensive symposiums and institutes globally, and have experience collecting original data on the ground in countries such as Uganda, Nigeria, and Vietnam. I am passionate about evidence and developing better empirical means of obtaining the... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 14:45 - 15:30
Giraffe 206

14:45

Open Data for Efficient Governance in Developing Countries
Limited Capacity full

This presentation is related to a pilot initiative that is currently being implemented in Nepal. The action research explores the rationale of adopting open data practices in budgetary process to bridge the information gap between government executive agencies, parliamentarians and citizens This action research seeks to identify the data need of each of these three stakeholders, implement open data solution based on the need and document impact stories of enhanced government accountability and civic engagement.

While the research is focused on demand side, adequate effort have been put into engagement with the supply side as well to see how open data model, developed as part of the research can have sustainable impact in the long run. This research aims to explore how two distinct groups of data users - parliamentarians and local citizen intermediary organizations can use disaggregated data on budget allocation, expenditure and progress for enhanced government accountability and civic participation. At the local level, the research proposes to test innovative models of meeting data need of disconnected communities in an off-line environment.

This research represents an inquiry about open data solutions and its relation to enhanced policy making discourse at the central level and practical civic engagement strategies at the local level.

Speakers
avatar for Bibhusan Bista

Bibhusan Bista

CEO, YoungInnovations
I am the CEO and co-founder of YoungInnovations, a leading software development firm based in Nepal providing solutions to different parts of the globe. I have my background in technology, research and international development. I have led successful projects around open data, transparency accountability and other development issues. Iam an active member of IATI technical advisory group and Open Data Charter initiatives globally


Monday May 16, 2016 14:45 - 15:30
Giraffe 209

14:45

Building Inspirational Digital Products to Change the World
Limited Capacity seats available

To reach the ambition of the Sustainable Development Goals, we all need to know the extent of different problems in different places around the world. To complement the growing movements to collect and release open data about the big issues of our time, we need to deploy cutting-edge technologies to communicate that data effectively, so people can act before it's too late.

With ever-expanding datasets covering more topics and larger areas, the development sector has truly entered the age of big data. Making that data intelligible is the next big challenge to take on, which requires a combination of beautiful and intuitive design, powerful databases to complete complex analyzes and innovative visualization technologies. In an age where mobile phones are becoming the primary medium for learning about our world, we need to make sure we empower the billions of people coming online through basic phones and smartphones with the right data at the right time.

This talk will introduce how the data design agency vizzuality uses CartoDB software to build products that contribute to the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals. There will be a demonstration of projects using satellite data and cloud-computing to provide information to the 'bottom billion' through text and call-based services. From prioritizing malaria prevention efforts to helping farmers adopt more productive and sustainable practices, it's all about the right data at the right time.

Speakers
avatar for Craig Mills

Craig Mills

Chief Executive Officer, Vizzuality
Craig Mills is CEO of world-leading data design company vizzuality. He came to software development the long way round, starting off in Marine Biology and moving swiftly through GIS into data modeling and software development. Over the last decade Craig has helped build environmental applications with UN organisations, national governments, universities and NGOs from around the world, so has fantastic first hand experience of what it takes to... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 14:45 - 15:30
Giraffe 203

14:45

Building Workflows and Projects Using SMS + Integrations
Limited Capacity seats available

More and more projects and organisations are failing to achieve their key goals and deliver their project objectives due to communication problems and cost. FrontlineSMS is a tool that can reach any and everyone and can now recreate complex and bespoke workflows to save time, money and a lot of 'offline' effort.

Frontline's CTO of 3 years will lead a tech-focused presentation and demonstration of the full power of the latest FrontlineSMS app including automations, APIs, mobile money and everything in between.

Using SMS management tools allow for SMS messages to be sent, received and managed in such a way that systems can be configured to react to (in)correct answers, trigger something every Monday at 9am or Friday at 3pm, track pupils' and even teachers' progress. All in a scalable and localizable way

SMS is a low cost structured form of digital communication accessible to anyone with even the most basic of mobile phones. Common sharing of phones across families and villages means that it is often claimed that SMS has ~100% global penetration. Reaching more communities is easy only with SMS and if "access and quality cannot be decoupled" then it is a big part of the future.

FrontlineSMS as an organization has 10 years of global experience working with organizations in the educational sector. With successful projects across Africa, Asia, Latin America and more we provide and help to utilize technology platforms across many sectors.

Speakers
avatar for Alex Pitkin

Alex Pitkin

CTO + Projects, FrontlineSMS
Alex Pitkin joined the FrontlineSMS production team in Nairobi in January 2013 as the CTO. Alex runs all areas of the production team including product development, technical design and client-side consulting helping users new and old implement projects using the Frontline suite of apps. Before running SMS-driven projects with Frontline he worked in the digital democracy space for over 9 years with experience in consultation & crowd sourcing... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 14:45 - 15:30
Giraffe 205

14:45

Connecting of the Grid Urban Populations with TV White Spaces
Limited Capacity seats available

The digital divide is extreme in Africa. At Microsoft, we have been investigating various technologies to bridge this divide. In this session we will discuss our research around the TV White Spaces, the technology behind dynamic spectrum and how we have leveraged it, and worked with our partners to connect communities in Kenya, Tanzania, Ghana, Botswana, Namibia and South Africa.

Speakers
avatar for Frank McCosker

Frank McCosker

Director of Strategic Partnerships, Microsoft
Frank McCosker is General Manager of Affordable Access and Smart Financing in Microsoft’s 4Afrika Initiatives. He is responsible for designing and implementing affordable access projects in many countries on the African continent utilizing new technologies including TV White Spaces and dynamic spectrum allocation. He is also finding new and smart ways to make access to finance more affordable for the ICT ecosystem in African... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 14:45 - 15:30
Giraffe 202

14:45

Monitoring of SDGs with Example on Use of Mobile Water Quality Testing Tools
Limited Capacity seats available

In the late 1990's the United Nations created the MDGs to reinvigorate the international development sector around a number of big ideas, such as eradicating poverty and improving global health. The truth about their actual impact is more complex. There are many critics of them, especially focused on the way they were created (top down), if they had any impact (would have happened regardless of aid interventions), and the methodology and implementation (unattainable targets, unreliable data). At the time of the creation of the MDGs many of the IT technologies that we have today did not exist yet. The most important technology of all is probably the mobile phone. With the newly setup SDGs we now live in a world where IT technologies offer endless new possibilities. These technologies can especially help in more effectively keeping track of the progress being made, including monitoring of the SDGs. It is actually now possible to track a near 'real-time' what is happening on the ground.

At Akvo we create open source, internet and mobile software and sensors. We focus on making international development and country governance more effective, transparent and collaborative. We help our partners act to improve the management of water, sanitation, agriculture, health, energy, education and the environment. Our tools will also help in more effective monitoring of the SDGs.

Two examples of on-going global trends include From paper data collection to digital data collection (Akvo FLOW) and decentralized mobile water quality testing (Akvo Caddisfly).

A deeper dive into monitoring of the SDG Indicator 6.1.1: Percentage of population using safely managed drinking water services

"Method of computation: Household surveys and censuses currently provide information on types of basic drinking water sources listed above, and also indicate if sources are on premises. These data sources often have information on the availability of water and increasingly on the quality of water at the household level, through direct testing of drinking water for fecal or chemical contamination."

To ensure sustainable development for water, among other things we have to achieve safely managed drinking water services. There is only one way to do this in decentralized water systems, such as with rural water supply, but also within many urban situations, and that is to have decentralized water quality testing systems in place. Akvo's new and innovative water quality testing solutions provide easy to perform field screening tests, directly coupled to our large scale and proven field data collection system, Akvo FLOW.

Speakers
avatar for Luuk Diphoorn

Luuk Diphoorn

Manager East Africa Hub, Akvo.org
Luuk Diphoorn is Manager of Akvo's East Africa Hub Luuk leads Akvo's project activities with all our partners in East and Southern Africa, and steers the expansion of our hub in Nairobi, Kenya.



Monday May 16, 2016 14:45 - 15:30
Giraffe 204

15:30

16:00

mAgriculture: Increasing Efficiency and Improving Livelihoods
Limited Capacity full

Mobile technologies are greatly improving the quality and timeliness of services delivered by agricultural extension workers to farmers while at the same time increasing accountability and making reporting more efficient. However, as compared to other "m" fields, such as healthcare (mHealth), there has been relatively less attention to "mAgriculture", e.g., with fewer dedicated conferences and less funding.

In this presentation, Dimagi Field Manager Nele Groosman will present the wide range of ways that the CommCare mobile platform has been used in agriculture. Although originally designed for community health workers, CommCare has been deployed for four major sub-sectors of agriculture: Agricultural Extension Advisory, Value-chain Logistics, Cooperative Management and Support, and Financial Services. These use cases cover many points in the agricultural supply chain, to help agricultural programs increase efficiency and improve the livelihoods of stakeholders in of those involved in rural agriculture.

Nele will describe the process of designing and developing applications for agricultural initiatives. Participants will learn about different potential application of mobile technology to support agricultural development, as well as the challenges and considerations that come with designing and piloting ICT tools in low-resource rural settings. Dimagi has implemented 55 agricultural projects in 19 countries to date.

Speakers
avatar for Nele Groosman

Nele Groosman

Field Manager, Dimagi
Nele is passionate about using mobile technology to improve access of goods and services to rural communities. At Dimagi, she has developed numerous CommCare mobile applications for social enterprises that deliver clean water, solar lighting, health products, and agricultural inputs to customers in East Africa and beyond. These apps serve both as a job aid to sales agents and allow the management insights into sales made, accounts receivable, and... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 16:00 - 16:45
Giraffe 254

16:00

Unlocking Opportunities for Smallholders
Limited Capacity seats available

Accessing to quality extension services is still a major challenge in developing countries. This is not only about the availability of the required service rather more about the awareness and willingness of the farmers to avail the services. It also observed that in addition to the public extension facilities, input supplier could play an important role in this process. BIID introduced the Zero Cost EAS model to address these multi-layer challenges in extension eco-system. The model consists of 3 major components - engagement of input supplier, integrate ICT solutions and intense communication & awareness building. The BIID model foresees a potential sustainable model with win-win business proposition for all the stakeholders. Currently BIID is implementing the model in Bangladesh in collaboration with Bangladesh Seed Association (BSA) and its members (BRAC Seed, ACI Seed, Mallika Seed and Kishan Agro Services) with support from Katalyst. Soon the model will be scaled up with the financial institutes and other input service providers.

Speakers
AN

Amolo Ng'weno

East Africa Regional Director, Bankable Frontier Associates
Amolo Ng'weno is the Bankable Frontier Associates East African Regional Director. She previously worked as the Managing Director of Digital Divide Data Kenya, a social enterprise that provides data and research services. Prior to that, she worked for the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation where she held a position as Deputy Director in the Financial Services for the Poor team in the Global Development Program. She was also a co-founder of Africa... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 16:00 - 16:45
Giraffe 255

16:00

Zero Cost EAS: Making Extension Services Sustainable
Limited Capacity seats available

Accessing to quality extension services is still a major challenge in developing countries. This is not only about the availability of the required service rather more about the awareness and willingness of the farmers to avail the services. It also observed that in addition to the public extension facilities, input supplier could play an important role in this process. BIID introduced the Zero Cost EAS model to address these multi-layer challenges in extension eco-system. The model consists of 3 major components - engagement of input supplier, integrate ICT solutions and intense communication & awareness building. The BIID model foresees a potential sustainable model with win-win business proposition for all the stakeholders. Currently BIID is implementing the model in Bangladesh in collaboration with Bangladesh Seed Association (BSA) and its members (BRAC Seed, ACI Seed, Mallika Seed and Kishan Agro Services) with support from Katalyst. Soon the model will be scaled up with the financial institutes and other input service providers.

Speakers
avatar for Shahid Akbar

Shahid Akbar

Chief Executive Officer, Bangladesh Institute of ICT in Development (BIID)
Md Shahid Uddin Akbar is the Chief Executive Officer (CEO) at Bangladesh Institute of ICT in Development (BIID), an inclusive business initiative to promote the use of ICT as a tool for development. Fostering ICT integration in development initiatives and mainstreaming ICT4D in developing countries is the core focus area of BIID. Mr Akbar led various e-Agriculture projects and entrepreneurship development programs for small business and... Read More →
SN

Sumaiya Nour

Manager (Program), Bangladesh Institute of ICT in Development (BIID)
Sumaiya Nour has been working with Bangladesh Institute of ICT in Development (BIID) since 2013. She has been working as manager for programs, under which she worked in project planning, management and coordination of various projects which include among other Smart Farmer-Smart Future, Zero Cost Extension and Advisory Service, Farmbook Implementation under MEAS and Developing Irrigation Scheduling App with CIMMYT. These projects focus on... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 16:00 - 16:45
Giraffe 253

16:00

Harnessing Digital Networks to Reach Newborns and Strengthen Postnatal Care
Limited Capacity filling up

Neonatal mortality contributes to over 55% of under 5 child deaths in Bangladesh. In rural northwest Bangladesh, 85% of births
occur at home and only 27% receive any postnatal care (PNC) by a trained provider within 2 days of childbirth, a practice considered
essential to the health of mother and the vulnerable neonate. More than 20% infants are born preterm, and nearly half are low birth weight - unprepared to encounter the many challenges home-based
deliveries present. Essential newborn care can maximize chances of survival and identify critical danger signs in these vulnerable infants.
Methods: A comprehensive system called mCARE allowed community health workers (CHWs) to conduct digital pregnancy surveillance of 11,836 women, enroll pregnant women (n=800) and report birth outcomes digitally (including miscarriage, live births and stillbirths). Families in the intervention group (n=400) received two SMS reminders to access postnatal (PNC) and essential newborn care (ENC), their CHW was reminded to promote PNC near the time it was due. The comparison group received no targeted reminders by CHW or mobile message. Data collectors conducted verification visits to assess PNC and ENC utilization in both groups.
Results: 70% of women in the mobile group received PNC, compared to 40% in the control group. Women who did not receive PNC, (42%) in
control group and (4%) in mobile group, reported lack of time and distance as barriers, apparently removed by the mobile reminder, since services were not more distant compared to those in the intervention group. Danger signs were higher among women in control group (71.9%) than mHealth group (32.5%). 99.2% of newborns in mHealth group vs. 89.8% in control
group were immediately breastfed.
Conclusion: Women and newborns in the mHealth group were 2+ times more likely to receive PNC and reported having significantly fewer danger signs and improved outcomes.The integrated mCARE system improved timeliness, coverage and utilization of PNC and ENC in the mCARE
group, opening up the potential for delivery of essential neonatal intervention and averting preventable newborn deaths through immediate care and referral.

Speakers
avatar for Dr. Alain Labrique

Dr. Alain Labrique

PhD, MHS, MS, Director, Johns Hopkins University Global Health Initiative & Associate Professor Department of International Health /Epidemiology at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Department of Community-Public Health at Johns Hopkins School of Nursing, and Division of Health Sciences Informatics at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, John Hopkins University
Dr. Alain Labrique is the founding director of the Johns Hopkins University Global mHealth Initiative, a multi-disciplinary Center of Excellence of over 140 projects engaged in mHealth innovation and research across the Johns Hopkins system. | | An infectious disease epidemiologist with training in molecular biology and over a decade of field experience running large population-based research studies in low and middle-income countries, he... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 16:00 - 16:45
Giraffe 208

16:00

mHealth Tools for Malnutrition Screening and Follow-up in Low-Resource Settings: Learning's from Kenya deployment
Limited Capacity seats available

Delivering interventions for acute malnutrition in low-resource settings is an arduous endeavor. Beyond the effort of managing the sheer caseloads, other challenges faced include logistics, stock management, development and enforcement of protocols, high turnover of service-providers, limited visibility into the magnitude of the problem and, subsequently, of their impact. Having a tool that could provide and centralized solutions for several of these challenges could and has proven useful to several organizations. This aim of this abstract is to share the experiences of Save the Children in using mobile health to begin to address some of the aforementioned challenges in Kenya.
Project implementation: Starting in 2014, World Vision Canada and Save the Children partnered with Dimagi an organization involved in developing mobile health applications designed as job-aides for health workers for Integrated Management of Acute Malnutrition (IMAM). This happened in a consortium and is being undertaken in four countries namely Kenya, Niger, Chad and Mali. In this agreement Dimagi would integrate the World Health Organization (WHO) protocol into an algorithm that enforces the global malnutrition treatment protocols that health centers should follow. Reflecting a decision-tree, the application guides clinic staff through screening for malnutrition, classifies the degree of the illness, prompts recommendations for treatment and counseling, and automatically lists beneficiaries into groups for follow-up. On the back-end, viewable by program staff, the application generates both granular data about each visit for every beneficiary (pregnant or lactating women, or children under five) as well as global data, for trends across the intervention areas.
In Kenya deployment started in January 2015, the IMAM application was assessed and adapted to the Kenyan Context in line with IMAM guidelines from the application made for Niger. Following a scoping visit made in Wajir, the original application was modified and contextualized. The modification factored inputs from local health protocols, Z-Score calculations auto-generated by the mobile platform, locally-vetted, personalized counseling messages in multiple languages and dialects, as well as culturally-relevant images. The prototype was then tested with select users and refined before training and launching in selected health clinics. The entire process took about 10 months and actual use of the application was in November 2015. So far using the application health workers have been able to reach 131 Pregnant and lactating women and 118 (60M, 58F) children in the Outpatient Treatment Program (OTP) and 156 (75M, 81F) children in Supplementary Feeding Center (SFP).
Methodology: In order to generate evidence, an evaluation using the Randomized Control Cluster Trial method is being done to run concurrently with the pilot implementation. An initial baseline assessment was undertaken, which was followed by a random selection of 20 health facilities from three sub counties (Wajir County (Wajir East, Wajir South and Tarbaj). The health facilities were stratified by sub-county and mobile signal strength and provided with mobile devices with the application. The remaining 25 health facilities in the three sub-counties continue to use the paper based system so as to act as comparison sites. In order to monitor the project, periodic observations will be conducted to compare quality of care in intervention and non-intervention sites together with prospective and historical data collection completeness, timeliness and quality.
Findings: The project implementation is still underway but the following have are the key learning's in so far;
- Field test and retesting of the application with end users (front line health workers) is vital
- Working in a consortium is more beneficial than working as a single entity, as lessons learn between contexts and implementing partners can be maximized.
- Its beneficial to work with a technology partner specialized in working in mHealth in low resource contexts since then you leverage on their experience
- While sensitization and involvement of Ministry of Health (MoH) is critical, it is a time consuming process.
- Evidence generation for learning and informing program implementation is crucial however, it is complex to implement and integrate with the pilot
Conclusions and implications: The quality of care and data potential of the mHealth application has not yet been sufficiently exploited since the program is still on going. Findings from the evaluation will answer questions on the applications potential for improvement of quality of care and empowerment of health workers in better management of acute malnutrition.
Acknowledgement: The project was funded by the USAID Office of U.S. Foreign Disaster Assistance (USAID/OFDA) through World Vision.

Speakers
avatar for Caroline Kimere

Caroline Kimere

Child Survival Research and Learning Coordinator, Save the Childre
Caroline Njeri Kimere, Child Survival Research and Learning Coordinator, Email: Caroline.Kimere@savethechildren.org, Save the Children - Kenya Programme Ms Kimere is a nutritionist with over 8 years' experience and is undertaking a Master's Degree in Public Health from the University of Nairobi. She has experience as a nutritionist where she has managed several programs funded by ECHO, DFID and UNICEF using the IMAM methodology in Mandera and... Read More →



Monday May 16, 2016 16:00 - 16:45
Giraffe 210

16:00

OpenSRP Tech and Implementation Overview
Limited Capacity filling up

WHO's Open Smart Register Platform (OpenSRP) is an open-source platform that supports frontline health workers (FHWs) in low-and-middle-income countries to digitally register and track health-events and services. The OpenSRP application deploys on Android tablets and leverages the robust backend of OpenMRS for storing patient medical records. The platform uses the XLSForm standard for authoring forms and Enketo webforms for data entry. Ona has been working with teams across three OpenSRP country-sites to map the public health community health data elements of FHWs into the global CIEL dictionary, contributing significant new concepts into the dictionary. Since forms are mapped with OpenMRS concept ID mappings, it allows the data collected in the community to be automatically transmitted to OpenMRS and stored inside the patient's medical record, which allows for the continuity of care as patients travel from their communities to tertiary health facilities for care. To facilitate those who wish to leverage OpenSRP for strengthening FHW health performance and accountability, we have developed protocols and communities of practice around mapping data and workflows, and developing technical requirements, for teams to successfully adapt and deploy OpenSRP in their own countries to catalyze health system strengthening, monitoring and achievement of the health SDGs. Participants will learn how to start using OpenSRP, and its comparison with other health ICT tools.

Speakers
avatar for Matt Berg

Matt Berg

CEO, Ona
Based in Nairobi, Kenya Matt is CEO of Ona. Prior to co-founding Ona, Matt served as the ICT Director for Modi Research Group at Columbia University and was the country director for the Geekcorps' Mali program where his work focused on promoting ICT and information access in rural Mali. Matt is a PopTech! Social Innovation Fellow and was named to the 2010 Time 100 List for his technology work in Africa. Matt has an MBA in International Management... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 16:00 - 16:45
Giraffe 211

16:00

Easy Book Production with Bloom! A Demonstration
Limited Capacity seats available

Bloom is a new publishing software tool that has gained worldwide recognition for its flexibility and ease of use in the development of locally-generated reading materials. Developed by experts in SIL International, and the winner of a recent All Children Reading grant from USAID and World Vision, Bloom is a free program that is being used in a number of African and Asian countries to facilitate the development of reading materials in community languages. 

Bloom contains templates for the development of leveled and decodable books as well as natural text; Symphony language analysis software is integrated into the Bloom tool, to help the writer maintain desired levels of readability. Illustrations and photographs are easily included in the text as well. The Bloom library contains a number of books that have been developed as "shell" books and can be translated into the desired language.

This demonstration will provide its audience with an understanding of what Bloom can do and how to use it.

If you are attending the training session, kindly install Bloom in your computer beforehand.  The link to install Bloom is http://bloomlibrary.org/installers/BloomInstaller.3.3.4.exe

Bloom only works on a PC, and not a tablet.  Bloom runs on Windows 7 or later.  It does not work on Windows XP.  It does not run on Mac or Android.  Bloom also requires .Net Framework 4.5. This is a Microsoft product that comes with Windows 8 or 10.  If you have Windows 7, you may need to install .Net Framework on your computer.  It requires Art of Reading 3 and this can be downloaded from the Bloom Website.  The Version should be 3.5


Speakers
RO

Ruth Obunyali

Book Development Consultant, SIL Africa
Ruth Obunyali works with SIL Africa's Advocacy and Alliance-Building Department in the area of book development, specifically the development of easy-reading reading materials in local languages. In the last 3 years Ruth has done both consulting and research in materials development projects in the Borana and Maasai communities of Kenya. Ruth is also an expert in the use of the Bloom software for facilitating local, low-cost publishing.



Monday May 16, 2016 16:00 - 16:45
Giraffe 200

16:00

Using Technology to Promote Education For All in Honduras
Limited Capacity seats available

Since 2012, CRS HN has implemented a USDA-supported Food For Education (FFE) project. The project's goal is to improve the literacy rate of 53,000 primary school children in the department of Intibuca. An obstacle to children receiving a quality education in Intibuca is the level of poverty, 40% of the population earn less than $1.25 per day, and high levels of illiteracy, 21.5% of adults over the age of 15 are illiterate.
CRS HN identified the lack of reliable data about the beneficiary population, including schools, teachers, parents, and students, as a challenge. In response, CRS HN used iFormbuilder to design data collection forms and trained 46 field promotors to use iPads and iPods to use these forms to collect field data from 509 communities. CRS HN used Zoho to generate reports from the collected data to identify service delivery trends across target populations.
This presentation will focus on the use of technology to capture data and make decisions. Key activities include: career development for teachers, incentive delivery and changes in child attendance, and teacher attendance trends. The presentation will transition to a discussion of next steps: Training communities to use technology to self-monitor, strengthening the Secretary of Education's technology-based platforms and systems for training teachers, identifying student populations not attending primary school, and looking for partnerships with private business to identify other potential ICT solutions.

Speakers
OC

Olga Canelas

MEAL Coordinator, CRS
Ms. Canelas has B. Sc. in Graphic Design. Her career with CRS includes experience in the development and implementation of MEAL system designs for education projects. She is currently serving as the FFE MEAL Project Coordinator and coordinates with two project partners, providing supervision and accompaniment to a staff of 6.



Monday May 16, 2016 16:00 - 16:45
Giraffe 201

16:00

How to Succeed without Operators
Limited Capacity seats available

A lot of the writing about ICT4D and M4D puts mobile network operator relationships at the center of successful programs, but just as often, the business side of operators is a huge barrier to sustainability or start-up.

This is a workshop where we describe why we build on aggregator and SIM card-based gateways. Having sustainable affordable and platform independent options promotes diversification of risk, accessibility for beneficiaries to scale beyond the pilot and sometimes just the ability to get a project started within budget!

We'll discuss the technical theory as well as various project examples and interactive demonstrations.

FrontlineSMS as an organisation has 10 years of global experience working with organisations in the educational sector. With successful projects across Africa, Asia, Latin America and more we provide and help to utilise technology platforms across many sectors..

Speakers
avatar for Alex Pitkin

Alex Pitkin

CTO + Projects, FrontlineSMS
Alex Pitkin joined the FrontlineSMS production team in Nairobi in January 2013 as the CTO. Alex runs all areas of the production team including product development, technical design and client-side consulting helping users new and old implement projects using the Frontline suite of apps. Before running SMS-driven projects with Frontline he worked in the digital democracy space for over 9 years with experience in consultation & crowd sourcing... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 16:00 - 16:45
Giraffe 258

16:00

The RedRose One System in DRC and Nigeria: Integrated e-Marketplaces for Improved Programming Efficiencies
Limited Capacity filling up

As the humanitarian aid sector has moved more towards choice-based provision of assistance, cash modalities have come to the forefront. While cash programming provides the benefits of flexible spending and promotes use of local market systems, new challenges have arisen about cash utilization and beneficiary tracking. Donors want assurance that funding is actually allocated to preferred types of assistance, but tracking cash use is complex. Additionally, while provision of cash is preferred, often affected locations in humanitarian crises have experienced disruptions in basic banking infrastructure. The RedRose One System provides an integrated e-marketplace platform, which can function both online and offline, and integrates beneficiary and vendor management, finance, and MEAL data on an online dashboard.
CRS in DRC launched, in October 2015, a six month emergency food assistance pilot project targeting 509 vulnerable returnee HHs near the city of Goma. The RedRose (RR) pilot aims to transfer a total of $141 to each beneficiary HH through smart cards (e-cards) using the ONEsystem RedRose platform. CRS/DRC began with a market study and, based on HHs' food preferences, 39 food commodities were integrated into the RR platform. Similarly, price data for all commodities was collected and included in the platform to avoid overcharging by vendors. The project remains flexible: based on beneficiaries' expressed needs NFIs were added to the assistance package. Commodity and NFI prices in the market are monitored weekly, which allows CRS to readjust the prices of the vendors if necessary. A post-activity monitoring tool will also be integrated in the field telephones for the RR platform.
CRS in Nigeria has utilized the RedRose One System in emergency food security programming and markets-based WASH programming, first utilizing the e-marketplace app on smartphones for vendors to makes sales to program participants who utilize smart cards, and second collecting data for pre and post intervention Knowledge, Attitudes and Practices (KAP) surveys and post distribution monitoring (PDM).

Speakers
avatar for Charles Bibuya

Charles Bibuya

Deputy MEAL/ICT4D Coordinator, CRS/DRC
He is a tenacious worker with extensive experience in Planning, Monitoring, Evaluation, Accountability and Learning (MEAL) of projects, data collection, Management and Statistical analysis, Information and Communication Technologies for Development (ICT4D). | He was able to combine his passion for MEAL and ICT4D. He is currently serve as the Deputy MEAL and ICT4D Coordinator in the DRC country program a multi-sectoral environment including... Read More →
ME

Marcelle Empey

International Development Fellow, Catholic Relief Services
Marcelle has a background in peacebuilding and monitoring and evaluation. She is currently supporting CRS/DRC’s emergency programming.
avatar for Maggie Holmesheoran

Maggie Holmesheoran

Emergency Coordinator, CRS
Maggie Holmesheoran: CRS Nigeria Yobe State Emergency Coordinator. Maggie supports all emergency programming in the northeast, including emergency food security, markets-based WASH and the CORE Group Polio Program. Maggie is an anthropologist, food and agriculture systems specialist, tech nerd and global public health practitioner. | Austin Ationg: CRS Nigeria CGPP MEAL Officer. Austin has 6 years of experience in field-based data systems... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 16:00 - 16:45
Giraffe 259

16:00

Emerging and Future ICT Solutions to Conserve Biodiversity
Limited Capacity seats available

Humanity exists at the intersection of two unprecedented ages. The first is of information and the ubiquitous computing that people have come to rely on in nearly all aspects of existence. The second is the Anthropocene - a new geological age characterized by exceptionally, exponentially negative and rapid impacts of human activities on earth's natural systems. One of the fundamental challenges of our time is to leverage the architecture of the information age to counter the Anthropocene. Much of that architecture will rest on increasingly intelligent IT that will help us to monitor, model, and manage environmental systems. This talk will highlight the rapid integration of ICT solutions for biodiversity conservation and illustrate the difficulties and promise of instrumenting natural systems.


Speakers
avatar for Dr. Lucas Joppa

Dr. Lucas Joppa

Microsoft Research, Microsoft
Lucas Joppa is an environmental scientist at Microsoft Research where he leads engagements on environmental sustainability and heads a research program on artificial intelligence, machine learning, and ubiquitous computing technologies for monitoring, modeling, and managing earth's natural environments. Topics of interest include some of the hardest challenges in environmental sustainability, including conserving biodiversity, ensuring robust... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 16:00 - 16:45
Giraffe 256

16:00

Kenya's Biodiversity Atlas - Mapping Kenya's Natural Capital for Sustainable Development
Limited Capacity seats available

Natural capital is the stock of natural ecosystems that yield a flow of valuable ecosystem goods and services. Mapping Kenya's natural capital is a first step to evaluating the status of our biodiversity and documenting the potential therein and the threats it faces.

Speakers
avatar for Lucy Waruingi

Lucy Waruingi

Executive Director, African Conservation Centre
Lucy Waruingi has been responsible for the co-ordination and successful implementation of various grants at ACC over many years including ecological and socio-economic field surveys. She also has extensive experience in project management and in the co-ordination of multi stake-holder partnerships.


Monday May 16, 2016 16:00 - 16:45
Giraffe 257

16:00

BTC4D
Limited Capacity seats available

An overview of digital currency technologies and where they might fit into the Dev world. Included in the discussion will be an explanation of how the blockchain works, as well as a comparative exploration of the mechanisms powering Bitcoin, Ripple, Ethereum, and Dash. In addition to looking at ledger issues, we’ll also discuss security, privacy, and the emergence of platform-oriented systems like NXT. The discussion will be illustrated with examples of proven uses.


Speakers
avatar for Ric Shreves

Ric Shreves

Senior Communications Officer, Mercy Corps
Ric Shreves is the Senior Internal Communications Officer at Mercy Corps and a long time advocate for digital currency technologies. In addition to his work at Mercy Corps, he is the co-founder of Coin Academy, the first digital currency education site. He’s spoken on blockchain technologies at the Inside Bitcoin conferences in Asia and was involved in efforts to foster a Bitcoin economy on the island of Bali.



Monday May 16, 2016 16:00 - 16:45
Giraffe 260

16:00

Leveraging ICTs Towards Destination 2030: A Case Study of CITARD
Limited Capacity seats available

In Uganda and most developing countries today, the majority of the population lives in rural areas. Faced with a lot of problems resulting from of lack of empowerment and information, these people cannot industriously perform their roles in society unless rightly informed. Citizens irrespective of location need information on health, food and nutrition, family planning, education, business and agriculture. For the people of Butaleja, the fluctuations between hope and disappointment, expectation and infuriation, has defined their lives for many years. It has for long been an intimidating task for them to get information they need for farming, market prices, pesticides, seeds health and education among other basic needs. The priority for them is to have the right information to enable them face today's challenges but how will they handle such challenges if they can't even get the simple information they need? However, there has been much cause for optimism for the people of Butaleja in the quest for destination 2030. The Communication and Information Technology for Agriculture and Rural Development (CITARD) is at the forefront of addressing their fundamental informational challenges. In this paper, a descriptive case study on how CITARD is meeting the needs of rural people to attain SDGs 1, 2, 4, 6, 7 & 13 will be presented. Benefits, challenges and way forward will also be presented. It is hoped that the paper will benefit a number of stakeholders including rural farmers, rural schools, governments of developing countries, public and community libraries and all community based organizations in the developing world.



Speakers
avatar for Eric Nelson Haumba

Eric Nelson Haumba

Founding Co-Director/ Head of Department Library and Information Services., CITARD/ YMCA Comprehensive Institute Kampala
Eric is the Head of Department Library and Information Services of YMCA Comprehensive Institute Kampala. He is attached to the Agshare project, a methodology that creates a scalable and sustainable collaboration of existing organizations for publishing, localizing, and sharing of science-based teaching and learning materials in Africa. The project creates, shares OERs with academics and local agricultural content with indigenous farmers in Uganda... Read More →



Monday May 16, 2016 16:00 - 16:45
Giraffe 252

16:00

Technology for Empowering Street Traders in Least Developed Countries
Limited Capacity seats available

The informal sector employs the major part of poor in developing countries. Street trading is a common form of informal employment among the youth in LDCs. Despite its huge economic in LDCs, not enough is being done to improve their empowerment and entrepreneurship. Also, development informatics is over-focused on social development and under-focused on economic development. This paper presents our design science initiatives to empower street traders through mobile technology in Tanzania. It falls under goal 8 (Decent work and economic growth).
Specifically the paper shows
- Findings from design science research (DSR) in order to identify barriers of street traders in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania,
- Ongoing Project for developing mobile phone applications for street traders business
- Technology based street traders business school
- The proposed technology for street traders business

.


Speakers
avatar for Nasibu Rajabu Mramba

Nasibu Rajabu Mramba

PhD Candidate and Lecturer, College of Business Education (CBE)
Nasibu Mramba is a Business Lecturer at the College of Business Education-Tanzania. He is teaching Small Business Management, Marketing and Youth Entrepreneurship. He is a holder of a Bachelor Degree in Marketing & Msc. International Trade. Currently he is perusing PhD in Business Informatics at the University of Eastern Finland. His PhD research is about empowering street trade through technology; where he explores the challenges of street... Read More →



Monday May 16, 2016 16:00 - 16:45
Giraffe 261

16:00

Evaluating Digital Citizen Engagement - a Practical Workshop
Limited Capacity filling up

With growing demand for transparency, accountability and citizen participation in policy making and service
provision, citizen engagement is becoming increasingly important. Citizen engagement means engagement
between citizens and governments, donors and the private sector bodies that deliver government services.
Increased use of technology brings both opportunities and challenges to citizen engagement processes,
including opportunities for collecting, analyzing and evaluating data about those processes.
This participatory and practical workshop will look at the effective evaluation of such Digital Citizen
Engagement (DCE) initiatives.

Speakers
avatar for Dr. Claudia Lopes

Dr. Claudia Lopes

Head of Research and Innovation, Africa's Voices Foundation
Claudia is Head of Research at Africa's Voices Foundation, a spin-out from the University of Cambridge, UK. Claudia has several years of experience working in Africa on research projects related to new technologies and radio audiences interactivity. She is trained as social psychologist and holds a PhD in Social Research Methods from the LSE.



Monday May 16, 2016 16:00 - 16:45
Giraffe 207

16:00

Open Schools Kenya
Limited Capacity seats available

Map Kibera made the invisible visible. Now Open Schools Kenya (www.openschoolskenya.org) is a project supported by Gates Foundation and implemented by Map Kibera Trust to try and make education information easily available, accessible and useful to everyone, focusing on Kibera as a pilot site. The project has seen around 350 schools mapped in Kibera including informal, private and public schools. The project aims to help parents make informed choices on which schools to take their children to depending on their capabilities and also preferences. Schools can also learn what other schools are doing hence healthy competition towards achieving the SDG number 4. And government now have the data for all the schools in Kibera and can use it for proper planning around education.  NGOs and donors can also use the website to fund or implement other educational programs in the area. The website gives each and every school  a profile page with details ranging from the population, programs offered, fees, contact info etc. 


Speakers
avatar for Joshua Ogure

Joshua Ogure

Project Coordinator, Map Kibera Trust
Joshua Ogure is the project coordinator for Map Kibera Trust, he coordinates the whole mapping team as well as the video team that is Kibera News Network. Ogure lead the Open Schools Kenya Project and resides in Kibera. He strives to make the invisible visible through the use of his hand held flip camera in and around his neighborhood. He is community award winner by ihub and recently came back from a four months fellowship program in the USA... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 16:00 - 16:45
Giraffe 206

16:00

Systems Change: Real-Time Data for Agile, Responsible and Participatory Development
Limited Capacity seats available

There is an increasing call by the global development community for Aid to be more agile, contextual and inclusive as we recognize how complex the environments are that we operate within. Movements like Doing Development Differently, Thinking and Working Politically, Feedback Labs, #adaptdev and others are trying to push donors and implementors to be more adaptive and problem-driven. These efforts have contributed to major donor reforms such as DFID's Smart Rules, the World Bank's Science of Delivery and USAID's upcoming revisions to its Operations Policy and Program Cycle, as well as larger investments in Adaptive Management. These efforts will create a large demand for services and tools that that allow for a more participatory and agile approach to development -- a demand that the ICT4D community can be well positioned to meet.   

This session will present the larger landscape in development that is pushing for these systemic changes, and present a new initiative that USAID's Global Development Lab is launching to conceive, design, and test how real-time data systems can enable a more adaptive and participatory approach to development in complex settings. This initiative is not focused on adaptation or feedbacks for their own sake, but how decisions can be made in a more responsive, contextual and participatory fashion with access to relevant and usable data at the appropriate times. The initiative is also concerned with how to most appropriately integrate flow data to and from multiple agents and decision makers across the 'information supply chain' - including community members, frontline workers, mid-level managers, and government decision makers - to facilitate rapid operational assessments, adaptive and iterative learning through tight feedback loops throughout the implementation of program delivery, and M&E. The understanding of the power, agency and behavior of the various decision makers, as well as the governance applications that allow for more sustainable and adaptive programming models, will be integral to the success of this work for the ICT4D and broader development community.


Speakers
ZB

Zack Brisson

Principal, Reboot
Zack Brisson is a founder & principal at Reboot, a social enterprise dedicated to inclusive development and accountable governance. A practicing theorist, Zack has extensive experience bringing community-driven approaches to policymaking, program design, and implementation. At Reboot, he helped the World Bank develop new public financial management diagnostic instruments, advised UNICEF & USAID through organizational transformation, and... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Samir Doshi

Dr. Samir Doshi

Senior Scientist, USAID
Dr. Samir K. Doshi is a Senior Scientist at USAID. Samir leads the Real-Time Data for Adaptive Management initiative at USAID's Global Development Lab, with a focus on how local communities can use digital technologies in complex environments to better monitor, evaluate, learn and adapt to emergent and dynamic situations. Samir also supports USAID's work on the Ebola response and the strengthening of health systems in West Africa. He has degrees... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 16:00 - 16:45
Cub

16:00

Achieving Sustainable Development
Limited Capacity seats available

Esri is developing a comprehensive "system of engagement" platform for monitoring the sustainable development goals. As an anchor partner to the Global Partnership for Sustainable Development Data (GPSDD) Esri has been working across the global partnership to develop a consistent and scalable framework for local and national accounting of SDG related programs and progress which can be summarized into global monitoring system. This presentation will feature an overview of core methodology, system capabilities and a demonstration of the platform.

Speakers
avatar for David Gadsden

David Gadsden

Nonprofit & Global Organizations Director, Esri
David Gadsden leads Esri's Nonprofit Sector which supports Nonprofits, Foundations, and International Organizations globally. David is also the administrator of the Nonprofit Organization Program which aims to empower nonprofits around the globe with Esri technology. David earned a BA in Geography from the University of Washington in 1995 with an emphasis in GIS, after which he served as an environmental volunteer with the US Peace Corps from... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 16:00 - 16:45
Giraffe 202

16:00

Managing Data Quality with Negative Reporting
Limited Capacity full

Your new M&E solution is a work of art. You spent the time on "user centric" design, got buy in from all of your field staff and managers, and selected the right technology to help you collect data from the field. Then, a year later, you find that your work of art isn't the "end-all" solution for capturing quality data that you had hoped. Now it's reporting season and you find yourself spending just as much time combing through a year's worth of paper to correct your data as you did before you switched from your old paper and Excel system. Where did you go wrong?

Bad data can render any M&E system useless, no matter how much care was put into the initial design. This session will illustrate how to harness the power of "negative reports" to help improve data quality. Negative reports help you identify those records that are missing critical information and can provide actionable information to project teams. Running these types of reports on a regular basis can drastically improve the quality of an M&E system and reduce the time required from M&E Managers to clean data when reporting deadlines are approaching.

Negative reporting is the missing component to many M&E systems being relied upon for critical data. Participants in this session will walk away with a new way of looking at their project or organization's reporting strategy and how using negative reporting can help them provide more accurate and timely data to their key stakeholders.

Speakers
avatar for Kevin Zeigler

Kevin Zeigler

Special Projects Manager, TechnoServe
Kevin Zeigler is a Special Projects Manager at TechnoServe tasked with helping both Corporate and Project teams design and implement systems to help drive the organization's impact. His passion is aligning project execution with technology so teams spend less time fighting with their systems and more time making data-driven decisions. He has overseen the design and implementation of regional and corporate-wide systems with a focus on... Read More →



Monday May 16, 2016 16:00 - 16:45
Giraffe 203

16:00

TolaData - Improving the Quality of Program Data
Limited Capacity full

TolaData was born from a need with in Mercy Corps to create centralized, sustainable, open source and standards based software and M&E practices for all of internal global programs.

The goal of Tola is to support adaptive program management and enable experienced-based learning by providing tools that can improve the quality of program data. Using open standards, Tola provides open source tools that are simple, adaptable, and extensible for data discovery and impact analysis. During this showcase you will learn about Tola's development and implementation, as well as highlights of its functionality. The focus will be on providing evidence for program indicators that is traceable, audible and shareable as well as provide tools for doing quick high level analysis.

Speakers
avatar for Greg Lind

Greg Lind

Software Developer/Business Analyst, Mercy Corps
I'm a software developer and systems architect and business analyst for Mercy Corps since 2011, previously working in the same capacity for regional, state and federal government agencies in the United States as well as small to large business and corporations like Hewlett-Packard and Nike since 1997 . I have spent the last 2 years working on a new open source data management platform for Mercy Corps for field based programs and M&E. I'm an... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 16:00 - 16:45
Giraffe 204

16:00

You Can't Have Big Data without Lots of Little Data
Limited Capacity filling up

All of the world's major donors have promised to release data about their effectiveness. The reality for most organizations is that this data doesn't yet exist in any usable form. How does information really flow between the field and stakeholders, how do we want it to flow, and how do we get there from here?

Speakers
avatar for Herb Caudill

Herb Caudill

Founder & CTO, DevResults
Herb Caudill is the founder and CTO of DevResults, a software platform for development projects and data. Herb grew up in a USAID family in Latin America and worked in Africa for 5 years, first teaching high-school math with the Peace Corps and then working on internet connectivity initiatives with USAID. He has been building web-based systems for international development organizations since 2000. Herb has an MBA from Georgetown University. He... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 16:00 - 16:45
Giraffe 205

16:00

Digital Privacy, Security and Safety: What Are They and How Can We Get Them Right? (1.5 Hours)
Limited Capacity full

Participants at this workshop will learn why digital privacy, safety and security are critical in development work today. Session facilitators will provide an overview of important terms and concepts in the field of data privacy and security and how certain practices can create greater risk for vulnerable groups and increase liability for organizations. Workshop attendees will learn about the importance of responsible data policies that protect and empower program participants, ways to reduce data-related risk for especially vulnerable populations such as girls and women, how responsible data policies affect program implementation at various levels, and why open data policies need to strike a balance with privacy policies. Workshop participants will leave with a better understanding of digital privacy, security, and safety and practical tools for developing ethical data policies and practices.

Moderators
avatar for Linda Raftree

Linda Raftree

Consultant, Independent
Linda Raftree (@meowtree) supports strategy, program design, research, and technology in international development initiatives. She currently consults with Girl Effect Mobile (GEM) on digital safety, security, privacy, strategy, and learning. She also advises The Rockefeller Foundation’s Evaluation Office on the use of ICTs in monitoring and evaluation. Linda organizes discussion and learning events through Kurante, a company she co-founded... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Amy O'Donnell

Amy O'Donnell

ICT in Program Lead, Oxfam
Amy is an adviser on applications of information communications technologies (ICTs) to support programming at Oxfam GB. Her role involves supporting staff working in humanitarian response, campaigning and long term development to explore effective design and best practice in the use of ICTs.
avatar for Paul Perrin

Paul Perrin

Director for Monitoring, Evaluation, Accountability and Learning, Catholic Relief Services
Paul Perrin is the Director for Monitoring, Evaluation, Accountability, and Learning at Catholic Relief Services (CRS) and serves as Adjunct Faculty at the University of Notre Dame. His work at CRS has largely focused on supporting country programs in conceptualizing, designing, implementing, analyzing, and reporting on monitoring and evaluation, as well as implementation science activities. Prior to acting in this capacity, he was the Senior... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 16:00 - 17:30
Giraffe 209

16:45

mAgriculture: Increasing Efficiency and Improving Livelihoods
Limited Capacity full

Mobile technologies are greatly improving the quality and timeliness of services delivered by agricultural extension workers to farmers while at the same time increasing accountability and making reporting more efficient. However, as compared to other "m" fields, such as healthcare (mHealth), there has been relatively less attention to "mAgriculture", e.g., with fewer dedicated conferences and less funding.

In this presentation, Dimagi Field Manager Nele Groosman will present the wide range of ways that the CommCare mobile platform has been used in agriculture. Although originally designed for community health workers, CommCare has been deployed for four major sub-sectors of agriculture: Agricultural Extension Advisory, Value-chain Logistics, Cooperative Management and Support, and Financial Services. These use cases cover many points in the agricultural supply chain, to help agricultural programs increase efficiency and improve the livelihoods of stakeholders in of those involved in rural agriculture.

Nele will describe the process of designing and developing applications for agricultural initiatives. Participants will learn about different potential application of mobile technology to support agricultural development, as well as the challenges and considerations that come with designing and piloting ICT tools in low-resource rural settings. Dimagi has implemented 55 agricultural projects in 19 countries to date.

Speakers
avatar for Nele Groosman

Nele Groosman

Field Manager, Dimagi
Nele is passionate about using mobile technology to improve access of goods and services to rural communities. At Dimagi, she has developed numerous CommCare mobile applications for social enterprises that deliver clean water, solar lighting, health products, and agricultural inputs to customers in East Africa and beyond. These apps serve both as a job aid to sales agents and allow the management insights into sales made, accounts receivable, and... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 16:45 - 17:30
Giraffe 254

16:45

Unlocking Opportunities for Smallholders
Limited Capacity seats available

Accessing to quality extension services is still a major challenge in developing countries. This is not only about the availability of the required service rather more about the awareness and willingness of the farmers to avail the services. It also observed that in addition to the public extension facilities, input supplier could play an important role in this process. BIID introduced the Zero Cost EAS model to address these multi-layer challenges in extension eco-system. The model consists of 3 major components - engagement of input supplier, integrate ICT solutions and intense communication & awareness building. The BIID model foresees a potential sustainable model with win-win business proposition for all the stakeholders. Currently BIID is implementing the model in Bangladesh in collaboration with Bangladesh Seed Association (BSA) and its members (BRAC Seed, ACI Seed, Mallika Seed and Kishan Agro Services) with support from Katalyst. Soon the model will be scaled up with the financial institutes and other input service providers.

Speakers
AN

Amolo Ng'weno

East Africa Regional Director, Bankable Frontier Associates
Amolo Ng'weno is the Bankable Frontier Associates East African Regional Director. She previously worked as the Managing Director of Digital Divide Data Kenya, a social enterprise that provides data and research services. Prior to that, she worked for the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation where she held a position as Deputy Director in the Financial Services for the Poor team in the Global Development Program. She was also a co-founder of Africa... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 16:45 - 17:30
Giraffe 255

16:45

Zero Cost EAS: Making Extension Services Sustainable
Limited Capacity seats available

Accessing to quality extension services is still a major challenge in developing countries. This is not only about the availability of the required service rather more about the awareness and willingness of the farmers to avail the services. It also observed that in addition to the public extension facilities, input supplier could play an important role in this process. BIID introduced the Zero Cost EAS model to address these multi-layer challenges in extension eco-system. The model consists of 3 major components - engagement of input supplier, integrate ICT solutions and intense communication & awareness building. The BIID model foresees a potential sustainable model with win-win business proposition for all the stakeholders. Currently BIID is implementing the model in Bangladesh in collaboration with Bangladesh Seed Association (BSA) and its members (BRAC Seed, ACI Seed, Mallika Seed and Kishan Agro Services) with support from Katalyst. Soon the model will be scaled up with the financial institutes and other input service providers.

Speakers
avatar for Shahid Akbar

Shahid Akbar

Chief Executive Officer, Bangladesh Institute of ICT in Development (BIID)
Md Shahid Uddin Akbar is the Chief Executive Officer (CEO) at Bangladesh Institute of ICT in Development (BIID), an inclusive business initiative to promote the use of ICT as a tool for development. Fostering ICT integration in development initiatives and mainstreaming ICT4D in developing countries is the core focus area of BIID. Mr Akbar led various e-Agriculture projects and entrepreneurship development programs for small business and... Read More →
SN

Sumaiya Nour

Manager (Program), Bangladesh Institute of ICT in Development (BIID)
Sumaiya Nour has been working with Bangladesh Institute of ICT in Development (BIID) since 2013. She has been working as manager for programs, under which she worked in project planning, management and coordination of various projects which include among other Smart Farmer-Smart Future, Zero Cost Extension and Advisory Service, Farmbook Implementation under MEAS and Developing Irrigation Scheduling App with CIMMYT. These projects focus on... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 16:45 - 17:30
Giraffe 253

16:45

Harnessing Digital Networks to Reach Newborns and Strengthen Postnatal Care
Limited Capacity seats available

Neonatal mortality contributes to over 55% of under 5 child deaths in Bangladesh. In rural northwest Bangladesh, 85% of births
occur at home and only 27% receive any postnatal care (PNC) by a trained provider within 2 days of childbirth, a practice considered
essential to the health of mother and the vulnerable neonate. More than 20% infants are born preterm, and nearly half are low birth weight - unprepared to encounter the many challenges home-based
deliveries present. Essential newborn care can maximize chances of survival and identify critical danger signs in these vulnerable infants.
Methods: A comprehensive system called mCARE allowed community health workers (CHWs) to conduct digital pregnancy surveillance of 11,836 women, enroll pregnant women (n=800) and report birth outcomes digitally (including miscarriage, live births and stillbirths). Families in the intervention group (n=400) received two SMS reminders to access postnatal (PNC) and essential newborn care (ENC), their CHW was reminded to promote PNC near the time it was due. The comparison group received no targeted reminders by CHW or mobile message. Data collectors conducted verification visits to assess PNC and ENC utilization in both groups.
Results: 70% of women in the mobile group received PNC, compared to 40% in the control group. Women who did not receive PNC, (42%) in
control group and (4%) in mobile group, reported lack of time and distance as barriers, apparently removed by the mobile reminder, since services were not more distant compared to those in the intervention group. Danger signs were higher among women in control group (71.9%) than mHealth group (32.5%). 99.2% of newborns in mHealth group vs. 89.8% in control
group were immediately breastfed.
Conclusion: Women and newborns in the mHealth group were 2+ times more likely to receive PNC and reported having significantly fewer danger signs and improved outcomes.The integrated mCARE system improved timeliness, coverage and utilization of PNC and ENC in the mCARE
group, opening up the potential for delivery of essential neonatal intervention and averting preventable newborn deaths through immediate care and referral.

Speakers
avatar for Dr. Alain Labrique

Dr. Alain Labrique

PhD, MHS, MS, Director, Johns Hopkins University Global Health Initiative & Associate Professor Department of International Health /Epidemiology at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Department of Community-Public Health at Johns Hopkins School of Nursing, and Division of Health Sciences Informatics at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, John Hopkins University
Dr. Alain Labrique is the founding director of the Johns Hopkins University Global mHealth Initiative, a multi-disciplinary Center of Excellence of over 140 projects engaged in mHealth innovation and research across the Johns Hopkins system. | | An infectious disease epidemiologist with training in molecular biology and over a decade of field experience running large population-based research studies in low and middle-income countries, he... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 16:45 - 17:30
Giraffe 208

16:45

mHealth Tools for Malnutrition Screening and Follow-up in Low-Resource Settings: Learning's from Kenya deployment
Limited Capacity seats available

Delivering interventions for acute malnutrition in low-resource settings is an arduous endeavor. Beyond the effort of managing the sheer caseloads, other challenges faced include logistics, stock management, development and enforcement of protocols, high turnover of service-providers, limited visibility into the magnitude of the problem and, subsequently, of their impact. Having a tool that could provide and centralized solutions for several of these challenges could and has proven useful to several organizations. This aim of this abstract is to share the experiences of Save the Children in using mobile health to begin to address some of the aforementioned challenges in Kenya.
Project implementation: Starting in 2014, World Vision Canada and Save the Children partnered with Dimagi an organization involved in developing mobile health applications designed as job-aides for health workers for Integrated Management of Acute Malnutrition (IMAM). This happened in a consortium and is being undertaken in four countries namely Kenya, Niger, Chad and Mali. In this agreement Dimagi would integrate the World Health Organization (WHO) protocol into an algorithm that enforces the global malnutrition treatment protocols that health centers should follow. Reflecting a decision-tree, the application guides clinic staff through screening for malnutrition, classifies the degree of the illness, prompts recommendations for treatment and counseling, and automatically lists beneficiaries into groups for follow-up. On the back-end, viewable by program staff, the application generates both granular data about each visit for every beneficiary (pregnant or lactating women, or children under five) as well as global data, for trends across the intervention areas.
In Kenya deployment started in January 2015, the IMAM application was assessed and adapted to the Kenyan Context in line with IMAM guidelines from the application made for Niger. Following a scoping visit made in Wajir, the original application was modified and contextualized. The modification factored inputs from local health protocols, Z-Score calculations auto-generated by the mobile platform, locally-vetted, personalized counseling messages in multiple languages and dialects, as well as culturally-relevant images. The prototype was then tested with select users and refined before training and launching in selected health clinics. The entire process took about 10 months and actual use of the application was in November 2015. So far using the application health workers have been able to reach 131 Pregnant and lactating women and 118 (60M, 58F) children in the Outpatient Treatment Program (OTP) and 156 (75M, 81F) children in Supplementary Feeding Center (SFP).
Methodology: In order to generate evidence, an evaluation using the Randomized Control Cluster Trial method is being done to run concurrently with the pilot implementation. An initial baseline assessment was undertaken, which was followed by a random selection of 20 health facilities from three sub counties (Wajir County (Wajir East, Wajir South and Tarbaj). The health facilities were stratified by sub-county and mobile signal strength and provided with mobile devices with the application. The remaining 25 health facilities in the three sub-counties continue to use the paper based system so as to act as comparison sites. In order to monitor the project, periodic observations will be conducted to compare quality of care in intervention and non-intervention sites together with prospective and historical data collection completeness, timeliness and quality.
Findings: The project implementation is still underway but the following have are the key learning's in so far;
- Field test and retesting of the application with end users (front line health workers) is vital
- Working in a consortium is more beneficial than working as a single entity, as lessons learn between contexts and implementing partners can be maximized.
- Its beneficial to work with a technology partner specialized in working in mHealth in low resource contexts since then you leverage on their experience
- While sensitization and involvement of Ministry of Health (MoH) is critical, it is a time consuming process.
- Evidence generation for learning and informing program implementation is crucial however, it is complex to implement and integrate with the pilot
Conclusions and implications: The quality of care and data potential of the mHealth application has not yet been sufficiently exploited since the program is still on going. Findings from the evaluation will answer questions on the applications potential for improvement of quality of care and empowerment of health workers in better management of acute malnutrition.
Acknowledgement: The project was funded by the USAID Office of U.S. Foreign Disaster Assistance (USAID/OFDA) through World Vision.

Speakers
avatar for Caroline Kimere

Caroline Kimere

Child Survival Research and Learning Coordinator, Save the Childre
Caroline Njeri Kimere, Child Survival Research and Learning Coordinator, Email: Caroline.Kimere@savethechildren.org, Save the Children - Kenya Programme Ms Kimere is a nutritionist with over 8 years' experience and is undertaking a Master's Degree in Public Health from the University of Nairobi. She has experience as a nutritionist where she has managed several programs funded by ECHO, DFID and UNICEF using the IMAM methodology in Mandera and... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 16:45 - 17:30
Giraffe 210

16:45

OpenSRP Tech and Implementation Overview
Limited Capacity seats available

WHO's Open Smart Register Platform (OpenSRP) is an open-source platform that supports frontline health workers (FHWs) in low-and-middle-income countries to digitally register and track health-events and services. The OpenSRP application deploys on Android tablets and leverages the robust backend of OpenMRS for storing patient medical records. The platform uses the XLSForm standard for authoring forms and Enketo webforms for data entry. Ona has been working with teams across three OpenSRP country-sites to map the public health community health data elements of FHWs into the global CIEL dictionary, contributing significant new concepts into the dictionary. Since forms are mapped with OpenMRS concept ID mappings, it allows the data collected in the community to be automatically transmitted to OpenMRS and stored inside the patient's medical record, which allows for the continuity of care as patients travel from their communities to tertiary health facilities for care. To facilitate those who wish to leverage OpenSRP for strengthening FHW health performance and accountability, we have developed protocols and communities of practice around mapping data and workflows, and developing technical requirements, for teams to successfully adapt and deploy OpenSRP in their own countries to catalyze health system strengthening, monitoring and achievement of the health SDGs. Participants will learn how to start using OpenSRP, and its comparison with other health ICT tools.

Speakers
avatar for Matt Berg

Matt Berg

CEO, Ona
Based in Nairobi, Kenya Matt is CEO of Ona. Prior to co-founding Ona, Matt served as the ICT Director for Modi Research Group at Columbia University and was the country director for the Geekcorps' Mali program where his work focused on promoting ICT and information access in rural Mali. Matt is a PopTech! Social Innovation Fellow and was named to the 2010 Time 100 List for his technology work in Africa. Matt has an MBA in International Management... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 16:45 - 17:30
Giraffe 211

16:45

Easy Book Production with Bloom! A Demonstration
Limited Capacity seats available

Bloom is a new publishing software tool that has gained worldwide recognition for its flexibility and ease of use in the development of locally-generated reading materials. Developed by experts in SIL International, and the winner of a recent All Children Reading grant from USAID and World Vision, Bloom is a free program that is being used in a number of African and Asian countries to facilitate the development of reading materials in community languages. 

Bloom contains templates for the development of leveled and decodable books as well as natural text; Symphony language analysis software is integrated into the Bloom tool, to help the writer maintain desired levels of readability. Illustrations and photographs are easily included in the text as well. The Bloom library contains a number of books that have been developed as "shell" books and can be translated into the desired language.

This demonstration will provide its audience with an understanding of what Bloom can do and how to use it.

If you are attending the training session, kindly install Bloom in your computer beforehand. The link to install Bloom is http://bloomlibrary.org/installers/BloomInstaller.3.3.4.exe

Bloom only works on a PC, and not a tablet.  Bloom runs on Windows 7 or later.  It does not work on Windows XP.  It does not run on Mac or Android.  Bloom also requires .Net Framework 4.5.  This is a Microsoft product that comes with Windows 8 or 10.  If you have windows 7, you may need to install .Net Framework in your computer.  It also requires Art of Reading which can be downloaded from the Bloom Website.  The version should be 3.5.

 


Speakers
RO

Ruth Obunyali

Book Development Consultant, SIL Africa
Ruth Obunyali works with SIL Africa's Advocacy and Alliance-Building Department in the area of book development, specifically the development of easy-reading reading materials in local languages. In the last 3 years Ruth has done both consulting and research in materials development projects in the Borana and Maasai communities of Kenya. Ruth is also an expert in the use of the Bloom software for facilitating local, low-cost publishing.



Monday May 16, 2016 16:45 - 17:30
Giraffe 200

16:45

Using Technology to Promote Education For All in Honduras
Limited Capacity seats available

Since 2012, CRS HN has implemented a USDA-supported Food For Education (FFE) project. The project's goal is to improve the literacy rate of 53,000 primary school children in the department of Intibuca. An obstacle to children receiving a quality education in Intibuca is the level of poverty, 40% of the population earn less than $1.25 per day, and high levels of illiteracy, 21.5% of adults over the age of 15 are illiterate.
CRS HN identified the lack of reliable data about the beneficiary population, including schools, teachers, parents, and students, as a challenge. In response, CRS HN used iFormbuilder to design data collection forms and trained 46 field promotors to use iPads and iPods to use these forms to collect field data from 509 communities. CRS HN used Zoho to generate reports from the collected data to identify service delivery trends across target populations.
This presentation will focus on the use of technology to capture data and make decisions. Key activities include: career development for teachers, incentive delivery and changes in child attendance, and teacher attendance trends. The presentation will transition to a discussion of next steps: Training communities to use technology to self-monitor, strengthening the Secretary of Education's technology-based platforms and systems for training teachers, identifying student populations not attending primary school, and looking for partnerships with private business to identify other potential ICT solutions.

Speakers
OC

Olga Canelas

MEAL Coordinator, CRS
Ms. Canelas has B. Sc. in Graphic Design. Her career with CRS includes experience in the development and implementation of MEAL system designs for education projects. She is currently serving as the FFE MEAL Project Coordinator and coordinates with two project partners, providing supervision and accompaniment to a staff of 6.



Monday May 16, 2016 16:45 - 17:30
Giraffe 201

16:45

How to Succeed without Operators
Limited Capacity filling up

A lot of the writing about ICT4D and M4D puts mobile network operator relationships at the center of successful programs, but just as often, the business side of operators is a huge barrier to sustainability or start-up.

This is a workshop where we describe why we build on aggregator and SIM card-based gateways. Having sustainable affordable and platform independent options promotes diversification of risk, accessibility for beneficiaries to scale beyond the pilot and sometimes just the ability to get a project started within budget!

We'll discuss the technical theory as well as various project examples and interactive demonstrations.

FrontlineSMS as an organisation has 10 years of global experience working with organisations in the educational sector. With successful projects across Africa, Asia, Latin America and more we provide and help to utilise technology platforms across many sectors..

Speakers
avatar for Alex Pitkin

Alex Pitkin

CTO + Projects, FrontlineSMS
Alex Pitkin joined the FrontlineSMS production team in Nairobi in January 2013 as the CTO. Alex runs all areas of the production team including product development, technical design and client-side consulting helping users new and old implement projects using the Frontline suite of apps. Before running SMS-driven projects with Frontline he worked in the digital democracy space for over 9 years with experience in consultation & crowd sourcing... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 16:45 - 17:30
Giraffe 258

16:45

The RedRose One System in DRC and Nigeria: Integrated e-Marketplaces for Improved Programming Efficiencies
Limited Capacity seats available

As the humanitarian aid sector has moved more towards choice-based provision of assistance, cash modalities have come to the forefront. While cash programming provides the benefits of flexible spending and promotes use of local market systems, new challenges have arisen about cash utilization and beneficiary tracking. Donors want assurance that funding is actually allocated to preferred types of assistance, but tracking cash use is complex. Additionally, while provision of cash is preferred, often affected locations in humanitarian crises have experienced disruptions in basic banking infrastructure. The RedRose One System provides an integrated e-marketplace platform, which can function both online and offline, and integrates beneficiary and vendor management, finance, and MEAL data on an online dashboard.
CRS in DRC launched, in October 2015, a six month emergency food assistance pilot project targeting 509 vulnerable returnee HHs near the city of Goma. The RedRose (RR) pilot aims to transfer a total of $141 to each beneficiary HH through smart cards (e-cards) using the ONEsystem RedRose platform. CRS/DRC began with a market study and, based on HHs' food preferences, 39 food commodities were integrated into the RR platform. Similarly, price data for all commodities was collected and included in the platform to avoid overcharging by vendors. The project remains flexible: based on beneficiaries' expressed needs NFIs were added to the assistance package. Commodity and NFI prices in the market are monitored weekly, which allows CRS to readjust the prices of the vendors if necessary. A post-activity monitoring tool will also be integrated in the field telephones for the RR platform.
CRS in Nigeria has utilized the RedRose One System in emergency food security programming and markets-based WASH programming, first utilizing the e-marketplace app on smartphones for vendors to makes sales to program participants who utilize smart cards, and second collecting data for pre and post intervention Knowledge, Attitudes and Practices (KAP) surveys and post distribution monitoring (PDM).

Speakers
avatar for Charles Bibuya

Charles Bibuya

Deputy MEAL/ICT4D Coordinator, CRS/DRC
He is a tenacious worker with extensive experience in Planning, Monitoring, Evaluation, Accountability and Learning (MEAL) of projects, data collection, Management and Statistical analysis, Information and Communication Technologies for Development (ICT4D). | He was able to combine his passion for MEAL and ICT4D. He is currently serve as the Deputy MEAL and ICT4D Coordinator in the DRC country program a multi-sectoral environment including... Read More →
ME

Marcelle Empey

International Development Fellow, Catholic Relief Services
Marcelle has a background in peacebuilding and monitoring and evaluation. She is currently supporting CRS/DRC’s emergency programming.
avatar for Maggie Holmesheoran

Maggie Holmesheoran

Emergency Coordinator, CRS
Maggie Holmesheoran: CRS Nigeria Yobe State Emergency Coordinator. Maggie supports all emergency programming in the northeast, including emergency food security, markets-based WASH and the CORE Group Polio Program. Maggie is an anthropologist, food and agriculture systems specialist, tech nerd and global public health practitioner. | Austin Ationg: CRS Nigeria CGPP MEAL Officer. Austin has 6 years of experience in field-based data systems... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 16:45 - 17:30
Giraffe 259

16:45

Emerging and Future ICT Solutions to Conserve Biodiversity
Limited Capacity seats available

Humanity exists at the intersection of two unprecedented ages. The first is of information and the ubiquitous computing that people have come to rely on in nearly all aspects of existence. The second is the Anthropocene – a new geological age characterized by exceptionally, exponentially negative and rapid impacts of human activities on earth’s nature systems. One of the fundamental challenges of our time is to leverage the architecture of the information age to counter the Anthropocene. Much of that architecture will rest on increasingly intelligent IT that will help us monitor, model, and manage environmental systems. This talk will highlight the rapid integration of ICT solutions for biodiversity conservation and illustrate the difficulties and promise of instrumenting natural systems. 

Speakers
avatar for Dr. Lucas Joppa

Dr. Lucas Joppa

Microsoft Research, Microsoft
Lucas Joppa is an environmental scientist at Microsoft Research where he leads engagements on environmental sustainability and heads a research program on artificial intelligence, machine learning, and ubiquitous computing technologies for monitoring, modeling, and managing earth's natural environments. Topics of interest include some of the hardest challenges in environmental sustainability, including conserving biodiversity, ensuring robust... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 16:45 - 17:30
Giraffe 256

16:45

Kenya's Biodiversity Atlas - Mapping Kenya's Natural Capital for Sustainable Development
Limited Capacity seats available

Natural capital is the stock of natural ecosystems that yield a flow of valuable ecosystem goods and services. Mapping Kenya's natural capital is a first step to evaluating the status of our biodiversity and documenting the potential therein and the threats it faces.

Speakers
avatar for Lucy Waruingi

Lucy Waruingi

Executive Director, African Conservation Centre
Lucy Waruingi has been responsible for the co-ordination and successful implementation of various grants at ACC over many years including ecological and socio-economic field surveys. She also has extensive experience in project management and in the co-ordination of multi stake-holder partnerships.


Monday May 16, 2016 16:45 - 17:30
Giraffe 257

16:45

BTC4D
Limited Capacity full

An overview of digital currency technologies and where they might fit into the Dev world. Included in the discussion will be an explanation of how the blockchain works, as well as a comparative exploration of the mechanisms powering Bitcoin, Ripple, Ethereum, and Dash. In addition to looking at ledger issues, we’ll also discuss security, privacy, and the emergence of platform-oriented systems like NXT. The discussion will be illustrated with examples of proven uses.


Speakers
avatar for Ric Shreves

Ric Shreves

Senior Communications Officer, Mercy Corps
Ric Shreves is the Senior Internal Communications Officer at Mercy Corps and a long time advocate for digital currency technologies. In addition to his work at Mercy Corps, he is the co-founder of Coin Academy, the first digital currency education site. He’s spoken on blockchain technologies at the Inside Bitcoin conferences in Asia and was involved in efforts to foster a Bitcoin economy on the island of Bali.


Monday May 16, 2016 16:45 - 17:30
Giraffe 260

16:45

Leveraging ICTs towards Destination 2030: A case study of CITARD
Limited Capacity seats available

A nation that neglects the development and empowerment of the rural communities should not expect significant socio-economic transformation. Consequently, social problems in Uganda are growing. Poverty, disease and illiteracy are by-far the major barriers to Uganda's rural populace. All these problems are being cultivated by the lack of information. It's clearly evident that information hunger is prevalent and biting hard on our rural communities, which has resulted in illiteracy, poverty and in some areas of the country miserable hunger.
In Uganda and most developing countries today, the majority of the population lives in rural areas. Faced with a lot of problems resulting from of lack of empowerment and information, these people cannot industriously perform their roles in society unless rightly informed. Citizens irrespective of location, need information on health, food and nutrition, family planning, education, business and agriculture. For the people of Butaleja, the fluctuations between hope and disappointment, expectation and infuriation, has defined their lives for many years. It has for long been an intimidating task for them to get information they need for farming, market prices, pesticides, seeds health and education among other basic needs. The priority for them is to have the right information to enable them face today's challenges but how will they handle such challenges if they can't even get the simple information they need? However, there has been much cause for optimism for the people of Butaleja in the quest for destination 2030. The Communication and Information Technology for Agriculture and Rural Development (CITARD) is at the forefront of addressing their fundamental informational challenges. In this paper, a descriptive case study on how CITARD is meeting the needs of rural people to attain SDGs 1, 2, 4, 6, 7 & 13 will be presented. Benefits, challenges and way forward will also be presented. It is hoped that the paper will benefit a number of stakeholders including rural farmers, rural schools, governments of developing countries, public and community libraries and all community based organizations in the developing world.

Speakers
avatar for Eric Nelson Haumba

Eric Nelson Haumba

Founding Co-Director/ Head of Department Library and Information Services., CITARD/ YMCA Comprehensive Institute Kampala
Eric is the Head of Department Library and Information Services of YMCA Comprehensive Institute Kampala. He is attached to the Agshare project, a methodology that creates a scalable and sustainable collaboration of existing organizations for publishing, localizing, and sharing of science-based teaching and learning materials in Africa. The project creates, shares OERs with academics and local agricultural content with indigenous farmers in Uganda... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 16:45 - 17:30
Giraffe 252

16:45

Technology for Empowering Street Traders in Least Developed Countries
Limited Capacity seats available

The informal sector employs the major part of poor in developing countries. Street trading is a common form of informal employment among the youth in LDCs. Despite its huge economic in LDCs, not enough is being done to improve their empowerment and entrepreneurship. Also, development informatics is over-focused on social development and under-focused on economic development. This paper presents our design science initiatives to empower street traders through mobile technology in Tanzania. It falls under goal 8 (Decent work and economic growth).
Specifically the paper shows
- Findings from design science research (DSR) in order to identify barriers of street traders in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania,
- Ongoing Project for developing mobile phone applications for street traders business
- Technology based street traders business school
- The proposed technology for street traders business

.


Speakers
avatar for Nasibu Rajabu Mramba

Nasibu Rajabu Mramba

PhD Candidate and Lecturer, College of Business Education (CBE)
Nasibu Mramba is a Business Lecturer at the College of Business Education-Tanzania. He is teaching Small Business Management, Marketing and Youth Entrepreneurship. He is a holder of a Bachelor Degree in Marketing & Msc. International Trade. Currently he is perusing PhD in Business Informatics at the University of Eastern Finland. His PhD research is about empowering street trade through technology; where he explores the challenges of street... Read More →



Monday May 16, 2016 16:45 - 17:30
Giraffe 261

16:45

Evaluating Digital Citizen Engagement - a Practical Workshop
Limited Capacity seats available

With growing demand for transparency, accountability and citizen participation in policy making and service
provision, citizen engagement is becoming increasingly important. Citizen engagement means engagement
between citizens and governments, donors and the private sector bodies that deliver government services.
Increased use of technology brings both opportunities and challenges to citizen engagement processes,
including opportunities for collecting, analyzing and evaluating data about those processes.
This participatory and practical one-day workshop will look at the effective evaluation of such Digital Citizen
Engagement (DCE) initiatives.

Speakers
avatar for Dr. Claudia Lopes

Dr. Claudia Lopes

Head of Research and Innovation, Africa's Voices Foundation
Claudia is Head of Research at Africa's Voices Foundation, a spin-out from the University of Cambridge, UK. Claudia has several years of experience working in Africa on research projects related to new technologies and radio audiences interactivity. She is trained as social psychologist and holds a PhD in Social Research Methods from the LSE.



Monday May 16, 2016 16:45 - 17:30
Giraffe 207

16:45

Inclusive ICT4Peacebuilding: Capturing the Narrative of Former Combatants in Tech-Supported Peacebuilding Programs
Limited Capacity seats available

Peacebuilding, or the process by which a community engages in institution-building and other activities that increase the likelihood of lasting peace, requires the buy-in and engagement of many actors from various corners of a post-conflict society.  

Security sector reform (SSR) and disarmament, demobilization, and reintegration (DDR) are two conflict-to-peace transition  institutions  that seek to 1) decrease the number of combatants in a given country and 2) increase the likelihood that these individuals will become contributing members of  government security forces and/or  civilian communities.  

The role of ICT4D in the peacebuilding realm has evolved over the past several years to include awareness of specific vulnerabilities and needs of communities emerging from conflict. Yet,  the dialogue regarding the future of ICT for peacebuilding remains remarkably void of conversation regarding the role that former combatants and security sector actors have to  play  in peacebuilding programming.  


We present several cases that  specifically engage these often marginalized populations and demonstrate promise for future ICT for peacebuilding programs.  We ground these case studies in theoretical constructs from the peacebuilding, security, and public health literatures in order to present a practical framework for developing such inclusive and innovative programming.  

Speakers

Monday May 16, 2016 16:45 - 17:30
Lioness

16:45

Open Schools Kenya
Limited Capacity seats available

Map Kibera made the invisible visible. Now Open Schools Kenya (www.openschoolskenya.org) is a project supported by Gates Foundation and implemented by Map Kibera Trust to try and make education information easily available, accessible and useful to everyone, focusing on Kibera as a pilot site. The project has seen around 350 schools mapped in Kibera including informal, private and public schools. The project aims to help parents make informed choices on which schools to take their children to depending on their capabilities and also preferences. Schools can also learn what other schools are doing hence healthy competition towards achieving the SDG number 4. And government now have the data for all the schools in Kibera and can use it for proper planning around education.  NGOs and donors can also use the website to fund or implement other educational programs in the area. The website gives each and every school  a profile page with details ranging from the population, programs offered, fees, contact info etc. 


Speakers
avatar for Joshua Ogure

Joshua Ogure

Project Coordinator, Map Kibera Trust
Joshua Ogure is the project coordinator for Map Kibera Trust, he coordinates the whole mapping team as well as the video team that is Kibera News Network. Ogure lead the Open Schools Kenya Project and resides in Kibera. He strives to make the invisible visible through the use of his hand held flip camera in and around his neighborhood. He is community award winner by ihub and recently came back from a four months fellowship program in the USA... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 16:45 - 17:30
Giraffe 206

16:45

Systems Change: Real-Time Data for Agile, Responsible and Participatory Development
Limited Capacity seats available

There is an increasing call by the global development community for Aid to be more agile, contextual and inclusive as we recognize how complex the environments are that we operate within. Movements like Doing Development Differently, Thinking and Working Politically, Feedback Labs, #adaptdev and others are trying to push donors and implementors to be more adaptive and problem-driven. These efforts have contributed to major donor reforms such as DFID's Smart Rules, the World Bank's Science of Delivery and USAID's upcoming revisions to its Operations Policy and Program Cycle, as well as larger investments in Adaptive Management. These efforts will create a large demand for services and tools that that allow for a more participatory and agile approach to development -- a demand that the ICT4D community can be well positioned to meet.   

This session will present the larger landscape in development that is pushing for these systemic changes, and present a new initiative that USAID's Global Development Lab is launching to conceive, design, and test how real-time data systems can enable a more adaptive and participatory approach to development in complex settings. This initiative is not focused on adaptation or feedbacks for their own sake, but how decisions can be made in a more responsive, contextual and participatory fashion with access to relevant and usable data at the appropriate times. The initiative is also concerned with how to most appropriately integrate flow data to and from multiple agents and decision makers across the 'information supply chain' - including community members, frontline workers, mid-level managers, and government decision makers - to facilitate rapid operational assessments, adaptive and iterative learning through tight feedback loops throughout the implementation of program delivery, and M&E. The understanding of the power, agency and behavior of the various decision makers, as well as the governance applications that allow for more sustainable and adaptive programming models, will be integral to the success of this work for the ICT4D and broader development community.


Speakers
ZB

Zack Brisson

Principal, Reboot
Zack Brisson is a founder & principal at Reboot, a social enterprise dedicated to inclusive development and accountable governance. A practicing theorist, Zack has extensive experience bringing community-driven approaches to policymaking, program design, and implementation. At Reboot, he helped the World Bank develop new public financial management diagnostic instruments, advised UNICEF & USAID through organizational transformation, and... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Samir Doshi

Dr. Samir Doshi

Senior Scientist, USAID
Dr. Samir K. Doshi is a Senior Scientist at USAID. Samir leads the Real-Time Data for Adaptive Management initiative at USAID's Global Development Lab, with a focus on how local communities can use digital technologies in complex environments to better monitor, evaluate, learn and adapt to emergent and dynamic situations. Samir also supports USAID's work on the Ebola response and the strengthening of health systems in West Africa. He has degrees... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 16:45 - 17:30
Cub

16:45

Achieving Sustainable Development
Limited Capacity seats available

Esri is developing a comprehensive "system of engagement" platform for monitoring the sustainable development goals. As an anchor partner to the Global Partnership for Sustainable Development Data (GPSDD) Esri has been working across the global partnership to develop a consistent and scalable framework for local and national accounting of SDG related programs and progress which can be summarized into global monitoring system. This presentation will feature an overview of core methodology, system capabilities and a demonstration of the platform.

Speakers
avatar for David Gadsden

David Gadsden

Nonprofit & Global Organizations Director, Esri
David Gadsden leads Esri's Nonprofit Sector which supports Nonprofits, Foundations, and International Organizations globally. David is also the administrator of the Nonprofit Organization Program which aims to empower nonprofits around the globe with Esri technology. David earned a BA in Geography from the University of Washington in 1995 with an emphasis in GIS, after which he served as an environmental volunteer with the US Peace Corps from... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 16:45 - 17:30
Giraffe 202

16:45

Managing Data Quality with Negative Reporting
Limited Capacity full

Your new M&E solution is a work of art. You spent the time on "user centric" design, got buy in from all of your field staff and managers, and selected the right technology to help you collect data from the field. Then, a year later, you find that your work of art isn't the "end-all" solution for capturing quality data that you had hoped. Now it's reporting season and you find yourself spending just as much time combing through a year's worth of paper to correct your data as you did before you switched from your old paper and Excel system. Where did you go wrong?

Bad data can render any M&E system useless, no matter how much care was put into the initial design. This session will illustrate how to harness the power of "negative reports" to help improve data quality. Negative reports help you identify those records that are missing critical information and can provide actionable information to project teams. Running these types of reports on a regular basis can drastically improve the quality of an M&E system and reduce the time required from M&E Managers to clean data when reporting deadlines are approaching.

Negative reporting is the missing component to many M&E systems being relied upon for critical data. Participants in this session will walk away with a new way of looking at their project or organization's reporting strategy and how using negative reporting can help them provide more accurate and timely data to their key stakeholders.

Speakers
avatar for Kevin Zeigler

Kevin Zeigler

Special Projects Manager, TechnoServe
Kevin Zeigler is a Special Projects Manager at TechnoServe tasked with helping both Corporate and Project teams design and implement systems to help drive the organization's impact. His passion is aligning project execution with technology so teams spend less time fighting with their systems and more time making data-driven decisions. He has overseen the design and implementation of regional and corporate-wide systems with a focus on... Read More →



Monday May 16, 2016 16:45 - 17:30
Giraffe 203

16:45

TolaData - Improving the Quality of Program Data
Limited Capacity seats available

TolaData was born from a need with in Mercy Corps to create centralized, sustainable, open source and standards based software and M&E practices for all of internal global programs.

The goal of Tola is to support adaptive program management and enable experienced-based learning by providing tools that can improve the quality of program data. Using open standards, Tola provides open source tools that are simple, adaptable, and extensible for data discovery and impact analysis. During this showcase you will learn about Tola's development and implementation, as well as highlights of its functionality. The focus will be on providing evidence for program indicators that is traceable, auditable and shareable as well as provide tools for doing quick high level analysis.

Speakers
avatar for Greg Lind

Greg Lind

Software Developer/Business Analyst, Mercy Corps
I'm a software developer and systems architect and business analyst for Mercy Corps since 2011, previously working in the same capacity for regional, state and federal government agencies in the United States as well as small to large business and corporations like Hewlett-Packard and Nike since 1997 . I have spent the last 2 years working on a new open source data management platform for Mercy Corps for field based programs and M&E. I'm an... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 16:45 - 17:30
Giraffe 204

16:45

You Can't Have Big Data without Lots of Little Data
Limited Capacity filling up

All of the world's major donors have promised to release data about their effectiveness. The reality for most organizations is that this data doesn't yet exist in any usable form. How does information really flow between the field and stakeholders, how do we want it to flow, and how do we get there from here?

Speakers
avatar for Herb Caudill

Herb Caudill

Founder & CTO, DevResults
Herb Caudill is the founder and CTO of DevResults, a software platform for development projects and data. Herb grew up in a USAID family in Latin America and worked in Africa for 5 years, first teaching high-school math with the Peace Corps and then working on internet connectivity initiatives with USAID. He has been building web-based systems for international development organizations since 2000. Herb has an MBA from Georgetown University. He... Read More →


Monday May 16, 2016 16:45 - 17:30
Giraffe 205

17:30

Cocktail Party
Monday May 16, 2016 17:30 - 19:30
Mamta Poolside
 
Tuesday, May 17
 

07:00

Exhibits
Exhibitors
avatar for Akros

Akros

Data for the Community, By the Community: Feedback Loops for Sanitation, Education and Malaria Control | Mobile data collection tools have revolutionized data timeliness, breadth, and quality in less developed countries. But what happens to those data after they are aggregated and analyzed? In cooperation with government ministries and traditional leaders in Zambia, Akros works to ensure routine surveillance data empower local decision-makers... Read More →
avatar for CABI

CABI

Plantwise: Sharing Plant Health | The Plantwise exhibit will demonstrate the Plantwise ICT innovations that Dr Washington Otieno will present in his breakout session.  Booth visitors will be able to interact with and explore the Plantwise Plant Doctor Simulator App and the Plantwise Factsheet Library App using Android tablets, On May 16 and 17, visitors will be able to see live demos of Plantwise e-plant clinics. This will allow... Read More →
avatar for Kimetrica

Kimetrica

Kimetrica | Our exhibit will focus on Kimetrica's Project Monitoring & Evaluation software -(ki-projects). Ki-projects is a web based software that combines aspects of results based project management with the full set of M&E functions. We will also be showing our offline data collection tool that can be used on android tablets to collect data in the field and sync back to the main system. You can find more details on the software... Read More →
avatar for Microsoft

Microsoft

Microsoft and NetHope | Through Microsoft's generous support, NetHope is pleased to join with Microsoft Philanthropies in the exhibit hall at the ICT4D Conference. In our booth, Microsoft will explain their ICT4D engagements ranging from the Public Cloud for Public Good offers by MS Philanthropies to the locally designed and commercially successful 4Africa Program. A host of other relevant and innovative technologies will be on display... Read More →
avatar for NetHope

NetHope

Microsoft and NetHope | Through Microsoft's generous support, NetHope is pleased to join with Microsoft Philanthropies in the exhibit hall at the ICT4D Conference. In our booth, Microsoft will explain their ICT4D engagements ranging from the Public Cloud for Public Good offers by MS Philanthropies to the locally designed and commercially successful 4Africa Program. A host of other relevant and innovative technologies will be on display... Read More →
avatar for SimbaNET

SimbaNET

Visit this exhibit to learn more about SimbaNET services and the underlying technology that supports them. | | About SimbaNET | SimbaNET Limited is a Regional Licensed Public Data Operator with national and international application licenses specialized in providing voice, video, high speed data and Internet connectivity. It owns an extensive network comprising of submarine and terrestrial optic fiber, the latest broadband WiMAX 4G wireless... Read More →
avatar for VaxTrac

VaxTrac

Building Customized Vaccine Registry Technology  | VaxTrac is a clinic based workflow management tool (currently using android based smartphones or tablets) used by frontline health workers to create and update patient level immunization records that are synchronized to the cloud and aggregated into the national health management information system. Data collected by VaxTrac is available to immunization program managers at every level of... Read More →
avatar for International Procurement Agency (USA), Inc.

International Procurement Agency (USA), Inc.

International Procurement Agency - USA IPA  | The USA IPA exhibit will display our capabilities in planning and implementing ICT solutions for organizations worldwide. Our 6-step approach to supply chain management enables us to offer comprehensive proposals that meet the needs of various programs. During the planning phase we consider the unique requirements of each project, from imaging and configuration to distribution at each field... Read More →
avatar for Christian Aid

Christian Aid

ICT for Enhanced Accountability | ICT solutions that are having significant impact on development. This booth will showcase health projects working with the m-Health platform and other digital data gathering and analysis tools. | | About Christian Aid | Christian Aid is an international development organisation registered in the UK (charity # 1105851) and working globally for profound change that eradicates the causes of poverty... Read More →
avatar for Akvo and CRS

Akvo and CRS

Efficient Use of Technology in Data Management for Evidence Based Decision Making and Transparency Akvo and Catholic Relief Services (CRS) will show case use of mobile phone based data collection tools including: Akvo Flow, a multi-language tool for collecting, collating and presenting diverse data types including geographically referenced data using a simple Android smartphone application and an online dashboard, Akvo Caddisfly, a... Read More →
avatar for University of Notre Dame

University of Notre Dame

Keough School of Global Affairs, University of Notre Dame | Within the new Keough School of Global Affairs are two integral units:the Kellogg Institute's Ford Family Program in Human Development working in East Africa to Investigate the interactions between effective community engagement and socioeconomic development to expand opportunities for people to flourish with dignity; and the Notre Dame Initiative for Global Development, which uses... Read More →
avatar for Hewlett Packard Enterprise

Hewlett Packard Enterprise

The Living Progress Challenge | Building on a 75 year history of citizenship, Hewlett Packard Enterprise is taking an innovative crowdsourcing approach to uncover pioneering digital solutions for millions of people disadvantaged by the digital divide. The Living Progress Challenge invited the global community to answer the question: What software applications and digital services would you create to improve lives? Visit our booth to see how it... Read More →
avatar for Helen Keller International

Helen Keller International

Multiple Uses of ICT for Improved Humanitarian Programming | This exhibit will present how ICT, integrated in every step of program management, has contributed to improving the design, the reach, the performance and the monitoring of humanitarian programs and health system functions in HKI 13 target countries in Sub Saharan Africa   | | HKI has developed expertise in ICT and has integrated it in its daily management practices all over the... Read More →
avatar for RTI International

RTI International

Power in Numbers: Harnessing Data to Revolutionize Development | Actionable insights and evidence that can be gained from data have the power to transform how international development is done. RTI International has the development expertise and data science capabilities needed to help governments, international organizations, and the private sector harness this "data revolution for development" and help design and implement programs that are... Read More →
avatar for Danoffice IT

Danoffice IT

Changing the World through Technology | The Danoffice IT exhibit will focus on Mobility and Mobile management. Danoffiice IT will showcase the latest trends and technologies with IT, Biometrics, Data Capture and Unmanned Aerial Systems. | | About Danoffice IT | At Danoffice IT we have more than 20 of experience of working within the humanitarian We are an experienced and dynamic group of passionate people, devoted in our field. We are proud... Read More →
avatar for sQuid Kenya

sQuid Kenya

Using Technology to Improve Education & Learning Outcomes | We wish to display our innovative payments and data technology that is currently being used in a large-scale intervention in Kenya that supports 150,000 primary schoolchildren, in 205 schools. The programme uses technology to improve education and learning outcomes by delivering: | Digital attendance monitoring using a NFC-enabled tablet and contactless smart card to capture... Read More →
avatar for Catholic Relief Services

Catholic Relief Services

CRS - ICT4D Innovation - eValuate and Farmbook eValuate is CRS' digital platform for collecting, managing and analyzing data on monitoring, evaluation, accountability and learning (MEAL). The platform uses ICT4D tools (including mobile devices, electronic data collection and integrated reporting) to achieve better MEAL. By using standardized yet flexible ICT4D tools, e-Valuate offers many advantages for MEAL: Easier and more accurate data... Read More →
avatar for Zerion Software, Inc.

Zerion Software, Inc.

3 Stages of Digital M&E | Learn how Zerion Software supports the 3 stages of Digital M&E and what it takes to implement digital M&E in your project to deliver impact. | | About Zerion Software | Creators of the iFormBuilder mobile platform, Zerion's newly formed Impact Solutions team provides expertise in impact driven data collection, management, analytics and improved performance. |
avatar for Motorola Solutions

Motorola Solutions

Motorola Solutions | This exhibit will showcase the following devices: | • Body work Cameras – LTE User Devices- Two way Radios | • Systems and Networks: LTE – Mototrbo Systems – Dispatch | | It will feature two-way radio applications covering the spectrum of mission critical and professional needs with solutions for network and device management, strict information assurance policies and advanced voice and... Read More →
avatar for Ona Systems

Ona Systems

Ona Data Platform | Ona (www.ona.io) is a simple, yet powerful data collection, management and analysis platform that makes it easy for everyone, from individuals to large, multi-national NGOs,to collect, manage, analyse and securely share their real-time data. | | Users can sign up for a free account and start collecting data within minutes. Surveys are authored in Excel (or any other spreadsheet program) using XLS Form syntax, an... Read More →
avatar for Voltaic Systems

Voltaic Systems

Portable Solar Power and Lighting | This exhibit will showcase a range of solar chargers designed to power smartphones, tablets, laptops, cameras and LED lighting. | | About Voltaic Systems | Voltaic Systems is a portable power company based in Brooklyn, New York. A drained phone in the middle of Spain led our founder to design the first solar backpack. We now provide a range of portable power and lighting solutions for NGOs, institutions, and... Read More →
avatar for One Mobile Projector per Trainer

One Mobile Projector per Trainer

One Mobile Projector per Trainer (OMPT) empowers organizations in developing countries to use video and cordless projectors to accelerate learning and behavior change. Their two-pronged approach delivers video production training and projection equipment to countries around the world. OMPT's equipment kits are specifically designed to be used in areas without electricity. The intervention is discipline agnostic and is being applied to... Read More →


Tuesday May 17, 2016 07:00 - 18:00
Jambo Conference Centre Exhibit Hall

07:00

Map Gallery
The Map Gallery provides illustrations of how maps can be used to advance the mission of organizations.

Mappers
CH

Crime Hot Spot Map for the City of Lahore

Information Technology University
Hotspot map identifies crime pockets of the city of Lahore. The maps are helping police optimize their patrolling plans.
avatar for Dadaab Camp Growth

Dadaab Camp Growth

Esri
The map will display how the extent of the Dadaab Camps have grown over time based on information extracted from satellite images using remote sensing. Some statistics will also be indicated such as the demographics of the displaced persons, the humanitarian/relief organizations operating within the camps, and comparisons with other internationally known refugee camps. It relies on data from UNHCR, imagery from LANDSAT and ASTER, and ENVI and... Read More →
DE

Digital Empowerment Program

Mahatma Gandhi Institute For Rural Industrialization
This map illustrates effective use of social media when combined with an ICT package for the rural sector. It helps build awareness of the Rural Digital Empowerment Program and how it allows data sharing and networking among similar stakeholders.
DO

Dissemination of Rumors in the Tana Delta

Sentinel Project
The map shows how rumours spread in Tana Delta over time and to which villages and in what order. It illustates how misinformation flows and aids in the implementation of campaigns to counter misinformation.
avatar for Ecological Land Unit Map

Ecological Land Unit Map

US Geological Survey & Esri
In 2014, the US Geological Survey (USGS) and Esri announced the publication of the most detailed global ecological land units (ELUs) map in the world. The ELUs are terrestrial ecosystems defined and modeled as unique combinations of bioclimate, landform, geology, and land cover. The first goal is to provide, for the first time, a web-based, GIS-ready, global ecophysiographic data product for land managers, scientists, conservationists... Read More →
avatar for Ethiopian Catholic Schools and Health Institutions

Ethiopian Catholic Schools and Health Institutions

Catholic Relief Services
This map depicts, the location of catholic institutions within Ethiopia by districts, proximity from major towns and where they overlap.
avatar for Ethiopian Social Infrastructure Mapping

Ethiopian Social Infrastructure Mapping

Catholic Relief Services
This map shows the location, distribution and type of social infrastructures built under the auspices of a Development Food Aid Program. It helps business developers to see where CRS's stakeholders are located and to inform project donors and implementers of progress in serving them. It improves decision making by the donors, staff and partners.
avatar for Find the malaria, Save a Life: How mSpray and GIS Improve Malaria Prevention

Find the malaria, Save a Life: How mSpray and GIS Improve Malaria Prevention

Akros
mSpray is a suite of mapping tools that puts IRS campaigns into efficiency overdrive. After enumerating structures from satellite imagery and QGIS, we send Spray teams into the field with cellular-enabled tablets, showing them where they are—and where the next house is they need to spray. When the team’s tablet is within 50m of a house, they can “tag” the structure as sprayed. The field teams (and their managers at... Read More →
FN

Flight Network Map for Pakistan

Information Technology University
This flight network map marks frequency of airplanes passing through different areas of Pakistan. The flight frequency map of Pakistan can help in the creation of an airborne networking platform to provide internet in the infrastructure challenged regions of Pakistan and other developing nations. Using this spatial data of airplanes we proposed a novel airborne networking approach to provide internet (beam down) to underprivileged communities... Read More →
avatar for ITAS Project Coverage

ITAS Project Coverage

International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA)
The purpose of this map is to showcase the villages where anyone can easily find the smallholders farmers group who are already involved in the ITAS network. The intent of this map is to help agricultural research institutions and ICT4Ag application builders to have clear information of where solutions are being provided to improve food security.
avatar for Kibera Schools

Kibera Schools

Map Kibera/ GroundTruth Initiative
The Kibera Schools Map was produced under ths auspices of the Open Schools Kenya Project, one in which residents map the schools in their neighborhood. This is the fisrt time all informal schools in Kibera were mapped alongside government schools.
avatar for Kibera Security Map

Kibera Security Map

Map Kibera/ GroundTruth Initiative
This map highlights insecure spots in Kibera and was used to support the Kenyan elections, as well as bringing attention to the need for improved general security measures such as street lights. It is based on input from community members as described. Since the map was produced, a number of street lights have been added.
avatar for Land Use Planning Map of a Rwandan Cell

Land Use Planning Map of a Rwandan Cell

Esri
This land use planning map of a Rwandan cell shows the cadastral plan, schools, hospitals and infrastructure on a nicely designed base map. 2000+ of these maps were printed and distributed to their respective cells to inform the local administrators and the population (who do not have access to internet and the National Land Use Planning Portal) on the development guidelines in place for their area. | | The maps were presented and explained at... Read More →
avatar for Map of Flood Level in Palo, Leyte Philippines

Map of Flood Level in Palo, Leyte Philippines

Catholic Relief Services
These are simple maps that were analyzed based on each household's interview regarding their flood level and water table. Each household were asked regarding where they want to construct their latrines in which questions regarding water table and flood level of the area were asked as well. With the GPS points collected, we used the interpolation analysis, to analyze spatially distributed GPS points and check their correlation with their nearest... Read More →
avatar for Map of Kibera, Various Points of Interest

Map of Kibera, Various Points of Interest

Map Kibera/ GroundTruth Initiative
This map contains data collected in OpenStreetMap (www.openstreetmap.org) by the Map Kibera team in areas such as toilets, water points, schools, shops, and many more. The information is current.
avatar for Map of Water Table Data in Palo, Leyte Philippines

Map of Water Table Data in Palo, Leyte Philippines

Catholic Relief Services
These are simple maps that were analyzed based on each household's interview regarding their flood level and water table. Each household were asked regarding where they want to construct their latrines in which questions regarding water table and flood level of the area were asked as well. With the GPS points collected, we used the interpolation analysis, to analyze spatially distributed GPS points and check their correlation with their nearest... Read More →
avatar for Monitoring Water Points in Ethiopia

Monitoring Water Points in Ethiopia

Akvo
This interactive map displays water point information collected with Akvo Flow in Ethiopia. (Akvo Flow is a digital data collection tool for Android phones, which captures the GPS data needed to map survey areas.) | | This particular map will display the results of a monitoring water point mapping program funded in Ethiopia funded by UNICEF (with World Vision and Oxfam as implementing partners). Water point data is collected in the field on... Read More →
avatar for Nepal Project Operations

Nepal Project Operations

Mercy Corps
This map identifies those areas of Nepal that are and are not serviced by Mercy Corps Projects. | | Mercy Corps Nepal (MCN): VDC / Municipality Coverage as of 2015 | Mercy Corps Nepal's Country Facts Portal Mercy Corps Nepal's Website
avatar for Northern Tanzania Rangelands Use

Northern Tanzania Rangelands Use

Honeyguide Foundation
This land use change detection map illustrates the change in northern Tanzania land use from untouched protected areas to ever-expanding settlements and farmlands. It informs rangelands and land use decisions, especially protection.
avatar for Project Performance Monitoring in Madagascar

Project Performance Monitoring in Madagascar

Catholic Relief Services
This map represents Fararano project performance in terms of output and outcomes such as growth monitoring (thematic map z-score), groups registered (thematics map/group type) and infrastructures localisations managed during the food for asset program. The map aids in decision making and project management by making activities implementation more relevant and focused.
avatar for Realtime Monitoring of School Latrine Construction in Ghana

Realtime Monitoring of School Latrine Construction in Ghana

Catholic Relief Services
This map shows the location of construction and contacts of community members involved in the construction of school latrines. It allows real-time monitoring of the construction process.
avatar for Recommendation Domains for Crop Variety Scaling in Tanzania

Recommendation Domains for Crop Variety Scaling in Tanzania

International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA)
This map identifies sustainable recommendation domains (SRDs) for scaling crop varieties and related agronomic practices in Tanzania. The map was generated from GIS and remote sensing data representing biophysical and socio-economic environments. Areas with homogenous biophysical and socio-economic characteristcs are identified. The critical ecosystems such as nature reserves and wetlands are masked to ensure that scaling of agricultural... Read More →
avatar for Satellite Assisted Pastoral Resource Management (SAPARM)

Satellite Assisted Pastoral Resource Management (SAPARM)

Project Concern International (PCI)
This map is an example of those used by pastoralist communities of over 1 million people in Ethiopia and Tanzania to inform their migration decision-making. Every year during the dry seasons, pastoralists migrate in search of adequate pasture for their livestock. However, climate change and repeated droughts are making traditional methods of migration decision making (indigenous knowledge, scouts, and dagu) increasingly unreliable, resulting in... Read More →
avatar for Spatial Distribution of Malawi Community Households in Relation to Weather-related Challenges

Spatial Distribution of Malawi Community Households in Relation to Weather-related Challenges

Catholic Relief Services
This map provides a display of spatial distribution of community households for a farm-inputs project in relation to exposure to weather-related challenges.The map was used to ensure local partner's objectivity in the selection of beneficiaries against the backdrop of vulnerability to changing weather patterns.The map allowed partner staff to review beneficiary identification criteria, provided a basis for weaning and identifying new... Read More →


Tuesday May 17, 2016 07:00 - 18:00
Jambo Conference Centre Exhibit Hall

08:00

Getting the Basics Right: The Digital Divide and its Impact on Achieving the SDGs
Over the past several years, an expanding number of global organizations have focused attention on supporting socioeconomic development through expanded leverage of Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs). This has been represented in the WTDC's Dubai Declaration in April 2014, and more recently within the Addis Ababa Action Agenda in July of 2015. The establishment of the new 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) for 2015-2030 in September 2015, in combination of ITU's Connect 2020, further highlight and strengthen this ICT4D commitment.

Within the SDG's, specific attention is highlighted by Target 9, where with respects to those countries most in need of socioeconomic development, the Least Developed Countries (LDCs), there needs to be a priority focus on expanding affordable Internet access by 2020. This theme is further expanded by ITU's Connect 2020 Agenda, though it reaches even beyond the LDCs. Connectivity is one of the themes reflected within the SDG-ICT Playbook as it is a fundamental cross-cutting topic needing attention.

This presentation will build off this growing global consensus by drilling down and adding definition to this Digital Challenge linking the connectivity challenge to the #1 SDG priority of eliminating poverty with the current connectivity divide. Further, it will put forward a suggested ecosystem approach for addressing not simply the connectivity shortfall, but also the need for addressing the essential value-added content and services and adoption by those most in need.

Speakers
avatar for Darrell Owen

Darrell Owen

International Development Consultant, Owen & Owen
Darrell Owen has been engaged in socioeconomic-focused Digital Development for over 22 years, initially as an employee of USAID, but also as an independent consultant to both the private and public sectors. With a Master’s degree in Telecommunications, Darrell’s focus has been on expanding Internet connectivity in developing countries, with priority on expanding affordable broadband access into rural communities–seeking to close the Digital... Read More →



Tuesday May 17, 2016 08:00 - 08:30
Jambo Conference Centre

08:30

National Data Revolution in Kenya
The Global Partnership for Sustainable Development Data (Global Partnership), hosted by the UN Foundation, was launched in September 2015 by more than 70 governments, civil society groups, companies, international organizations, and expert networks worldwide, the will help harness the data revolution to fill critical gaps, and ensure data is more accessible and useable to end extreme poverty, combat climate change, and ensure a healthy life for all.

Kenya is a founding member of the Global Partnership and is working with a wide range of actors to evoke a National Data Revolution in Kenya. The steering committee is hosted at the Office of the Deputy President and is focused on developing a data revolution roadmap, designing an integrated data systems, and strengthening national and county planning processes and tools.

Speakers
avatar for Philip Thigo

Philip Thigo

Office of the Deputy President (DP), Lead of the National Data Revolution agenda
Philip Thigo is a Kenyan technology & governance practitioner. He currently serves as a Senior Advisor on Data and Innovation at the Legislative and Intergovernmental Liaison Office, Office of the Deputy President of Kenya. He Co-founded INFONET in Kenya, an innovation initiative aimed at building capabilities of Governments, Civil Society & Citizens for better development outcomes. Mr. Thigo has previously held executive positions... Read More →



Tuesday May 17, 2016 08:30 - 09:00
Jambo Conference Centre

09:00

Converging Technologies and Sustainable Digital Development for All
The United Nations new Sustainable Development Agenda came into effect on January 1st 2016. The agenda recognizes ICTs and global connectivity as ‘holding great potential for human progress.’ It adopted a number of technology targets which include ‘universal and affordable access to the internet by 2030‘.
To ensure that everyone shares in the digital benefits of greater economic growth, social inclusion and environmental balance, we need innovative strategic partnerships that maximize the convergence of mobile, connectivity and cloud technologies. This panel will look at the challenges, opportunities and field-tested solutions we face in bringing digital empowerment and services to the developing world. It will also consider what business models can best sustain and increase demand for digital services.

Thought leaders will address a number of key questions, such as:
• How to roll out the required network infrastructure and financing models?
• How to create an enabling policy and regulatory environment that stimulates relevant local content and services?
• How can cloud computing and software applications for ‘eServices’ help drive demand for connectivity?
• What are possible interim strategies that can be deployed to bridge analog and digital service delivery?
• How to ensure that connectivity is supported by human capacity building and the development of digital literacy skills?
• How to enhance ICT access and skills for the most marginalized groups, including girls and women and persons with disabilities?

The guiding principle for this panel is the development of a sustainable digital development strategy, based on human rights and good governance, which utilizes ICTs as a cross-cutting and tactical means of implementation.

Moderators
avatar for Gary Fowlie

Gary Fowlie

Head, ITU Liason Office to the United Nations, International Telecommunications Union (ITU)
Gary Fowlie is the Head of the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) Liaison Office to the United Nations. ITU is the specialized agency of the UN responsible for information and communication technology. Gary worked as an Account Director for the global technology practice of the consulting firm Hill and Knowlton prior to joining the ITU and was responsible for communications for the UN World Summit on the Information Society. From... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Kate Krukiel

Kate Krukiel

Director of Strategic Partnerships, Microsoft
Kate Krukiel joined Microsoft in 2006 and is currently the Technology Advisor for Partnerships for the United Nations International Organizations. In this role she is responsible for developing the key strategic objectives, mission-related partnerships and solution strategies across the United Nations and other NGOs. In addition, Kate is a key advisor to top-level UN technology stakeholders. Kate's position allows her to extend Microsoft's... Read More →
avatar for Tom Marentette

Tom Marentette

Digital ND Lead Architect, University of Notre Dame
Tom Marentette has been with the University since 1997 in a variety of information technology roles, from network engineering to project management and his present day role as architect of teaching and learning technologies. His current responsibilities include the strategy, planning and execution of enterprise academic technologies and Information and Communication Technologies for Development (ICT4D) research, design and practice.
avatar for John Muchiri Muriithi

John Muchiri Muriithi

Head of Department, Merchant Payments, Safaricom
John is a well-seasoned commercial person with 15 years’ experience in sales & Marketing, 7 of which have been in the mobile industry mainly dealing with Mobile money. John has vast experience in distribution set up, strategy formulation, Business development, Key account management, Product management & trade marketing, Budgets formulation among other vital skills. He has championed the roll out of Lipa Na M-PESA in... Read More →
avatar for Chris Reichart

Chris Reichart

Chief Business Officer, Zerion Software, Inc.
Chris Reichart is the Chief Business Officer of Zerion Software, Inc. and co-creator of the award winning iFormBuilder mobile platform. Chris has over 16 years’ experience in the mobile technology industry, specifically focused on business development, technical sales, and user experience. Chris has helped iFormBuilder become the mobile data collection platform of choice for accelerating mobile workflows and expanding the user community to more... Read More →
avatar for Mwambu Wanendeya

Mwambu Wanendeya

Africa Executive Director, ONE
Mwambu Wanendeya serves as ONE’s Africa Executive Director. Prior to joining ONE he had leadership positions in finance and telecommunications for ten years leading global and regional teams responsible for brand, marketing, communications and corporate social responsibility for listed global companies. In that capacity he worked on award winning global campaigns for major international music events such as the Nelson Mandela’s 90 and 91st... Read More →


Tuesday May 17, 2016 09:00 - 09:45
Jambo Conference Centre

09:45

Kibera Town Center: A Community-Based Approach to Delivery of Basic and Empowerment Services
The Kibera Town Centre, a clean technology facility in one of the largest slums in the world, is an effort to merge high-quality physical facilities with new information-based design and operational capabilities.

See http://kiberawater.com for the UAV video flyover video.

We have built basic physical components (large building, deep borehole, water treatment, clean water distribution systems (bulk water, piped, and jerry-can), a highly efficient waste water treatment plant, power management systems, high-bandwidth microwave networks, local data caching and streaming infrastucture) and  we combine them to provide high quality basic services: clean drinking water, hand washing, cafe and restaurant, toilets, showers, laundry services, power and computer services. From this, we are working to build human systems of management, governance, rapid adaptation, agility, and response to community needs. We are attempting to bring new capabilities into one of the most entrepreneurial communities in the world, the slum community, and enable innovation in that community.

Our thirty managers, all from Kibera, are constantly refining and creating new ways to build upon this platform in a constantly changing political and economic environment.  We provide business skills training, IT training, credit and savings services, job placement focused on Internet-enabled jobs, educational and library services, and
are developing programs in construction crafts--in partnership with Kiberan organizations, local government, and  Kenyan and international corporations.  We incubate new enterprises that use these capabilities in new ways.

From an ICT4D perspective, we have created a testing platform to integrate new technologies in energy, water treatment, water quality sensors, spatial data acquisition, operational management, and information services. Our challenge is to demonstrate their effectiveness.

Our design incorporates real-time sensing and control of the physical plant, customer and service  quality monitoring through point of sale and proximity capabilities, and a continuous attempt to integrate disparate and conflicting technical and information systems. We are trying to understand the path from Software Defined Networks to Software Defined Buildings, Communities and Cities.

John Gage will describe the successes and failures of the Human Needs Project, and where we stand in creating a community-owned, self-sustaining center to develop a set of capabilities with Kiberan residents and the integral role that ICTs play in their delivery.

Speakers
avatar for John Gage

John Gage

CWTO/Board Member, Human Needs Project/Sun Microsystems
John Gage was a founder and the Chief Researcher for Sun Microsystems, Inc. and a partner in the venture capital firm Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers, where he provided counsel to the firm’s global network of entrepreneurs, scientists, academics, and government leaders. John is on the United Nations Digital Health Task Force, and has served on panels and governing boards of the  US National Research Council; US National Academy... Read More →


Tuesday May 17, 2016 09:45 - 10:15
Jambo Conference Centre

10:15

10:45

Community Knowledge Workers and Ag.-Extension Tech
Limited Capacity full

Effective extension outreach is key lever for strengthening the ability of smallholder coffee farmers in East Africa to achieve sustainable and resilient livelihoods. Kenya and Uganda have underdeveloped and underfunded extension services , in particular in Bungoma County, Kenya and Mbale County, Uganda near Mt. Elgon. In response Lutheran World Relief initiated the Climate Adapted Farming on Elgon (CAFE) project that has a focus on strengthening ag-extension services through the use of ICT to meet farmers' knowledge needs.
LWR staff members Garrett Schiche, Davin Wandera, Amos Sang will present on how the use of an ICT enabled ag-extension platform has been a key lever in helping smallholder coffee farmers on Mt. Elgon in Kenya and Uganda to make progress towards Sustainable Development Goals 2, 8, and 15 related sustainable agriculture, inclusive and sustainable economic growth and the protection of terrestrial ecosystems.
They will explain how the project put local farmers and ICT at the center of its ag-extension approach and will reflect on how the use of android phones preloaded with ag-extension information and a mobile survey application were key in the success of this approach. They will also highlight the challenges that have emerged regarding the post-project sustainability of the ICT platform and consequently the long-term sustainability of project outcomes.

Speakers
DW

Davin Wandera

Project Coordinator, Lutheran World Relief
Davin Wandera is currently the Project Coordinator for the Climate Adapted farming on Elgon project funded by Lutheran World Relief. Davin also worked as an Agronomist and M&E Officer on a USAID-Kenya Horticulture competitiveness project from 2010-2014. He holds a bachelors in Agriculture and is pursuing an MSc Degree in Agriculture Resource Management from the University of Nairobi.


Tuesday May 17, 2016 10:45 - 11:30
Giraffe 201

10:45

ICT for Disseminating Agronomic Advice
Limited Capacity filling up

The ATA is Government of Ethiopia (GoE) initiative with the primary aim of promoting agricultural sector transformation by supporting existing structures of government, private-sector and other non-governmental partners to address systemic bottlenecks and deliver on a priority national agenda to achieve growth and food security. The ATA’s ICT team is responsible for designing, developing, and supporting initiatives that address these systemic bottlenecks by using ICT to implement sustainable solutions.  One of these ICT is the 8028 Hotline, which is a mobile-based Interactive Voice Response (IVR) and Short Message Service (SMS) system used to disseminate agronomic advice to SMFs and other stakeholders. In 2014, the ATA designed, developed and implemented this system to disseminate year-round agronomic advice to farmers and development agents (DAs) throughout Ethiopia. The 8028 offers a range of advantages, addressing literacy barriers and character limitations for farmers, while facilitating detailed sharing of information in any Ethiopian language. To date, the system has received more than 9.4 million calls from 1.3 million registered users (of which approximately 950,000 users identified themselves as a farmer). The information collected during registration is used to broadcast additional information via IVR and SMS on topics ranging from crops disease and unseasonal rainfall to improved agronomic practices, equipping farmers and DAs with critical information needed to make informed decisions in a timely manner. The ATA is also piloting an IVR based helpdesk system, developed by Awaaz.De, in partnership with Digital Green, that will enable farmers or other users to post their questions and for experts to answer them.  

Speakers
avatar for Temesgen Gebeyehu

Temesgen Gebeyehu

ICT Technical Expert, Ethiopian Agricultural Transformation Agency (ATA)
Temesgen Gebeyehu has been working as ICT Technical Expert at ATA for the last one and half a year. Prior work experience includes working at World Vision, Millennium Village Project and UNICEF Project for 9 years. He is at the final year (2016) of the MSc. program in Information Science and also received BSc. in Information System (2004) from Addis Ababa University. He has certifications in MCP and MCTS (MS SQL Developer) and has... Read More →
avatar for Ermias Teshome

Ermias Teshome

ICT Technical Expert, Ethiopian Agricultural Transformation Agency (ATA)
Ermias Teshome has been working as an ICT Technical Expert at the ATA for the last two years on two major ICT based projects, one is on the dissemination of agronomic best practices via mobile phones to the Ethiopian smallholder farmers and the other is in collecting agricultural inputs distribution data using smart phones. He used to work at a local private IT company to develop the Ethiopian Government portal with an open source platform and... Read More →



Tuesday May 17, 2016 10:45 - 11:30
Giraffe 200

10:45

Innovative Business Models for ICT4D
Limited Capacity full

As the market for ICT4D solutions becomes more competitive, new business models are needed in order to continue to deliver value to customers and users. Esoko is now executing its second significant business model innovation in the company's history. In this session, we will talk broadly about business model innovation (what is it and what are some examples in developed markets?) then look at two ICT4D examples - Esoko and Zoona. We will end with some tips on business model innovation for entrepreneurs and a brief discussion of the topic with the participants.



Speakers
avatar for Hillary Miller-Wise

Hillary Miller-Wise

Chief Executive Officer (CEO), Esoko
Hillary Miller-Wise is the Chief Executive Officer of Esoko. Hillary has spent her career in social entrepreneurship in both the for-profit and NGO sectors. | | She spent five years at TechnoServe, where she led significant revenue growth of the Tanzania operations (CAGR of 68% over four years). While at TechnoServe, she forged partnerships with multi-nationals such as Vodafone, Tigo, General Mills and Olam. | | She also spent... Read More →



Tuesday May 17, 2016 10:45 - 11:30
Cub

10:45

Challenges in Implementing National mHealth Solutions: The MomConnect Experience
Limited Capacity filling up

MomConnect is a South African National Department of Health (DOH) mHealth initiative that was launched in August 2014. The project aims to:-

· Register pregnant women into an electronic database connected to a national health information exchange,

· Send these women stage-based SMS messages for the duration of their pregnancy and up to 1 year after the birth of the child,

· Allow these women to ask questions about their pregnancy and childcare-related health issues and to provide feedback on the quality of care received,

· Provide nurses and midwives, who are providing maternal and infant services, with cell phone based support and relevant messages related to their work.

As of August 2015, over 500,000 women throughout South Africa had been registered on MomConnect and were receiving messages. Through the implementation of the project, the South African National Department of Health, and its partners have overcome many issues related to effective scaling of the project, stakeholder engagement and interoperability. The Department of Health has also started to use data from the MomConnect system to improve aspects of the health system. This presentation provides an overview of the MomConnect project, and highlights important elements contributing its successful nationwide scaling, including leadership, wide-scale partner buy-in, appropriate technical solutions and linkage with other initiatives. The presentation also details issues which still need to be overcome.

Speakers
DA

Dr. Antonio Fernandes

Momconnect project manager, South Africa National Department of Health
Dr Antonio Fernandes is a Medical doctor and epidemiologist who is the project manager of the South African Department of Health's MomConnect project. He has significant experience in implementing health information systems through his work at the state information technology agency and the Gauteng provincial Health Information Systems directorate.


Tuesday May 17, 2016 10:45 - 11:30
Giraffe 203

10:45

Faster than Mosquitoes: Mobile Tech & Malaria
Limited Capacity filling up

Just sixty five years ago malaria was a major problem in the United States. Massive spraying campaigns and expensive infrastructure investments eliminated this long standing problem in just a few years. In Zanzibar and many other places suffering from malaria, these same expensive approaches have been used and success achieved in the short term, only to have funding disappear and malaria incidence quickly return to endemic levels. In places where medicine and information move slowly over big distances and rough roads, malaria, flying along in mosquitoes and migrant workers quickly outpaces all but the best funded efforts to keep it from spreading.

Yet, technology brings hope. Mobile phone signals travel even faster than mosquitoes. Capturing data about malaria cases from health clinics via interactive SMS and then quickly sending health workers with GPS equipped tablets to map and then treat infected households and their neighbors is proving to be a cost-effective way to keep malaria cases from spreading. In Zanzibar, twenty health workers equipped with inexpensive tablets and a motorbike are keeping malaria prevalance at less than 1% - a steady and sustained decrease from more than 35% just 15 years ago.

This approach is working in Zanzibar. Can it work in places that aren't islands? Can it work with other diseases? How can timely information help address other challenges in public health, education and governance?

Speakers
avatar for Michael McKay

Michael McKay

Technologist, RTI International
Mike McKay is a technology optimist living in Nairobi. He has spent the last twelve years applying technology to challenges in sub-Saharan Africa including financial inclusion, HIV care & treatment, diabetes & hypertension management, corruption reporting, malaria surveillance, early childhood education, healthcare for sex workers, and more. He's worked for and or with RTI, the WHO, Dimagi, CDC, Baobab Health, UNFPA, Qualcomm's Wireless Reach... Read More →


Tuesday May 17, 2016 10:45 - 11:30
Giraffe 204

10:45

Health Center by Phone: An Innovation for Achieving SDGs
Limited Capacity seats available

In Malawi, a woman has a one in 34 chance of dying during childbirth and 3% of newborns die in their first month. Facing a lack of access to reliable health information, long travel distances to health facilities and other barriers, women and caregivers of children may delay or avoid seeking care. Knowing when and where to go are critical to improving reproductive, maternal, neonatal and child health (RMNCH) outcomes.
To achieve Sustainable Development Goal 3, the health information gap must be addressed. Designed to improve information availability and appropriate care-seeking behavior, VillageReach, Airtel Malawi, and the Malawi Ministry of Health (MoH) operate Chipatala cha pa Foni (CCPF) or Health Center by Phone. CCPF has two main components:
1. A toll-free hotline staffed with health workers providing health information and advice.
2. A "tips and reminders" mobile messaging service providing weekly messages tailored to the client's week of pregnancy or a child's age.

CCPF has a statistically significant impact on MNCH knowledge and behavior. CCPF users show improvements in use of antenatal care within the first trimester, bed nets during pregnancy, early initiation of breastfeeding, and knowledge of healthy behaviors during pregnancy, such as avoiding harmful medicines. CCPF users trust the service and cite the ability to access health information from home, saving time, and saving travel costs, as key benefits.

CCPF recently merged with Airtel Malawi's Dial-A-Doc program to form Airtel CCPF, a zero-rated service providing health information and advice beyond RMNCH with physician triage ability. CCPF is now available in eight of Malawi's 28 districts. Under direction of the MoH, CCPF is expected to scale nationally by the end of 2017.

Speakers
ZJ

Zachariah Jezman

mHealth Programme Manager, VillageReach
Zachariah Jezman is the mHealth Programme Manager for VillageReach Malawi. He heads a Health Centre by phone service and mNutrition, a content development project. He is a member of the Reproductive and Maternal Health and mHealth Technical Working Groups of Malawi. Previously, he worked on community-based health projects with Clinton Health Access Initiative, clinical trials on HIV/AIDS with Johns Hopkins University, and taught at Mulanje... Read More →


Tuesday May 17, 2016 10:45 - 11:30
Giraffe 202

10:45

mBoost - Mobile Messaging to Drive Literacy
Limited Capacity filling up

mBoost, or mobile Boost, has been developed to test how we can use mobile technology to engage more with community members participating in Literacy Boost interventions. Using content from the Literacy Boost Reading Awareness Sessions for parents and the literacy flipbook, simple messages have been developed that can be sent via sms or audio to parents on ways they can engage with children on developing literacy skills. mBoost is being used to supplement face to face parenting awareness sessions, as an additional way to communicate with and remind parents to engage with their children. This session will share insights gained from our experiences in Bangladesh and other countries.

Speakers
avatar for Andy Williams

Andy Williams

Global CIO, Save the Children International
I can be reached in future at andy.p.williams28@gmail.com. | | I am happy to speak about the CIO role as a transformation leadership position in the sector, how NetHope is trying to help drive a higher level of digital ambition and thematic delivery and the importance of thinking from a 'global south' perspective as we devise new strategies and plans. | | My hopes for the Summit are that i will learn 2-3 things about these topics... Read More →


Tuesday May 17, 2016 10:45 - 11:30
Giraffe 260

10:45

Attitudes and Motivations for Women Using Technology & Entering Technology Careers in Kenya
Limited Capacity seats available

According to the last census in Kenya (National Housing and Population Census, 2009), women constitute slightly over half (50.3%) of the entire Kenyan population. This implies a near equal split between men and women. This near equal split does not however reflect in the uptake of opportunities between the two genders as would have been expected. Equally, women are noticeably under-represented in decision and policymaking concerning technological and socioeconomic development.
Debate on gender equity in education currently revolves around females in mathematics and science domains. Much of the debate about school science and mathematics, therefore, has focused around math and science performance between girls and boys. National exam results have consistently indicated that males perform better than girls in mathematics and sciences at secondary school. As a result, women struggle to enter many of the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields that have traditionally been dominated by men. In part, these gaps reflect pre-college choices made by men and women, but also to a large extent underpin gender disparities in various academic indicators linked to STEM, including educational outcomes and university enrollment.
The purpose of this study was to understand the factors influencing women's access and participation in science-related programmes in Kenya. In particular, the study carried out an investigation into the influence of self-efficacy, outcome expectations and social-contextual experiences during the pre-college education. STEM education provides platforms for socio-economic development, thus, inclusion of women leads to improved prospects for development as a whole.

Speakers
avatar for Judith Owigar

Judith Owigar

Operations Director, Akirachix Association
Judith Owigar is an entrepreneur who uses technology as a tool to empower youth and young women. She believes that exposure, education and use of technology can increase the quality of life and as such change the world. Judith is a co-founder and the Operations Director of Akirachix; a revolution for African women and technology. Through the Akirachix activities she seeks to increase the number of women who create technological solutions and in... Read More →



Tuesday May 17, 2016 10:45 - 11:30
Giraffe 261

10:45

Countering Dangerous Misinformation using ICTs
Limited Capacity seats available

Misinformation is a severe problem that poses challenges to peace, security, economic development, governance, and public health all around the world. One major problem that is arising from misinformation is a series of violence such as terror attacks, election violence and inter-communal violence. This presentation will highlight the process of choosing the right technology to handle misinformation, best practices of misinformation management and the main findings from Una Hakika a misinformation management system that was implemented after the Tana Delta conflict.
During 2012 and 2013 violence took place in the Tana Delta, killing an estimated 170 people. Research by the Sentinel team found out that misinformation was one of the drivers of the violence and to curb this , Una Hakika , which uses technology to counter misinformation was implemented. Results from a survey showed that basic mobile phone penetration stood at 83%, making SMS the appropriate technological tool to manage misinformation.
One finding from the study shows that 71% of the respondents believed that misinformation contributed to violence. One crucial lessons learnt is that misinformation management systems cannot be imposed from above, they need to be implemented bottom up and incorporate the communities involved.
The Una Hakika team has developed workflows, best practices, and software which civil societies and policy makers can apply not only in an insecure country context but in any other context.



Speakers
avatar for Christine Mutisya

Christine Mutisya

Project Coordinator, Sentinel Project
Christine Mutisya is a peacebuilding practioner. She currently works as the Una Hakika Project Coordinator an initiative by the Sentinel Project. Her areas of expertise include project management, misinformation management and community development. She has first hand field experience in peace building, conflict prevention and using ICTS to manage dangerous misinformation. Her current role involves managing the project, establishing and... Read More →



Tuesday May 17, 2016 10:45 - 11:30
Giraffe 258

10:45

Leveraging SBCC/ICT4D Innovations in the Fight against Ebola
Limited Capacity seats available

By increasing awareness of Ebola risks and working directly with communities to take action to protect themselves, CRS' Be Safe program increases community knowledge and promotes the adoption of protective behaviors to help reduce the likelihood of Ebola propagation in border communities of Senegal and Guinea Bissau. Drawing on the social-ecological theory, Be Safe complements existing mass-media awareness efforts, with additional community-level efforts which leverage the use of innovative ICT4D technology to foster dialogue, disseminate locally contextualized BCC and social mobilization approaches, spur action and shift community and social norms to better protect vulnerable communities. The project works directly with families, communities and leaders to shape social norms around Ebola through creating video messages which are then shared at scale using wireless mini-projectors. Be Safe builds on existing best practices in behavior change to implement effective approaches at scale and teamed up with One Mobile Projector Per Trainer (OMPT) to introduce mobile video projection capacity and technology to influence behavior change at the individual, household and community levels. By combining best practices in behavior change with a novel delivery approach, Be Safe accelerates knowledge transfer and behavior change in the most at risk communities. Given that Ebola is an emerging threat, and communication needs are not static, the easy-to-use and field-adapted mini-projectors and cellphone camera kits allow the project team to update its approaches and messages frequently to ensure that messages remain relevant throughout the life of the project.

Speakers
AS

Antoine Sanon

Emergency Coordinator, Catholic Relief Services
Antoine Sanon has 17 years of experience working in humanitarian preparedness and response, He is currently Emergency Coordinator at CRS Senegal also covering Mauritania, Guinea Bissau and the Gambia. Antoine holds an MA in Innovations, Development, and Societies (International Institute for Water and Environmental Engineering) and certificates in Disaster Risk Management and Result based financing in Health. Antoine is co-Founder of the High... Read More →



Tuesday May 17, 2016 10:45 - 11:30
Giraffe 259

10:45

Action for Cheetahs in Kenya: Framework for a National Cheetah Survey
Limited Capacity seats available

Action for Cheetahs in Kenya (ACK) is the only range wide cheetah conservation organization in Kenya. ACK conducted the first Kenya national cheetah survey in collaboration with the Kenya Wildlife Service, Cheetah Conservation Fund and the East African Wildlife Society between 2004 and 2007. Results of the survey formed the baseline for national and regional strategic planning in collaboration with IUCN and other cheetah experts from across Africa. Although we had some bias in the collection methodology we were the first to create a range wide map of cheetahs based on actual site visitation to all corners of the country. This presentation will highlight the changes being made to the first survey in order to assure the second survey will improve our knowledge. Occupancy modeling and genetic mapping will be used to conduct the second nationwide cheetah survey beginning in 2016. Detection dogs will locate scat to evaluate prey selection, cheetah health and genetic variability. Remote sensing technology will test assumptions on land use change affecting cheetah habitat. Models developed from the previous survey will be discussed in this presentation. The role of the local community and the international zoological facilities will be presented to encourage greater participation in the second national cheetah survey.

Speakers